Headboard

The joinery is complete but don't get too anxious and start gluing the headboard together just yet. There's a certain order to things that you'll want to know about first.

STAIN NOW. You'll remember that the headboard frame and the panels are stained contrasting colors. This left me with a decision — should I stain before or after the assembly. Prestairiing made the most sense. So at this point, I took the time to sand and stain all the parts. You'll find the two stain colors at our website.

THE ASSEMBLY. After the stain was dry, I carried all the pieces to the bench and got out the glue and clamps. The large size of the headboard can make the glueup a little tricky. So I took it in stages to make it more manageable. You'll need six-foot clamps to reach from side to side. If you don't have any long clamps, the box below gives you several good options.

I started the assembly by gluing the lower and middle rail between the legs. When this assembly is dry, you can drop the stiles (with glue) and panels into place from above. Finally, the upper rail is glued into the slot mortises in the legs and the clamps can go on.

A SIMPLE CAP. The last piece to be added to the headboard is a cham tybodsmtoh I

ONLINE EXTRAS

You can find information on the stains used on the bed at www.Woodsmith.com

NOTE: See page

31 for doweling technique

Chamfer c edges of cap

HEADBOARD CAP

NOTE: See page

31 for doweling technique

Chamfer c edges of cap

HEADBOARD CAP

fered cap that covers the top rail and legs. Glue holds the cap to the long grain of the top rail but the end grain on top of the legs is a poor glue surface. So here, I added a pair of dowels between each leg and the headboard cap, as shown in details 'a' and 'b.' If you turn to page 31, you'll find an easy way to match up the holes for the dowels.

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