HowTo Feature Packed

Adjustable Backer Board. A replaceable wood extension on the end of the fence of this miter sled allows you to back up your workpiece completely when making a cut.

Positive 90° Setting. An adjustable stop makes it easy to quickly return the fence to a 90° setting for right angle crosscuts. You'll find this feature on all the miter sleds.

Adjustable Stop. An adjustable stop on the fence allows you to cut multiple pieces to the same length. This stop is reversible, giving you two settings.

Adjustable Backer Board. A replaceable wood extension on the end of the fence of this miter sled allows you to back up your workpiece completely when making a cut.

Positive 90° Setting. An adjustable stop makes it easy to quickly return the fence to a 90° setting for right angle crosscuts. You'll find this feature on all the miter sleds.

Adjustable Stop. An adjustable stop on the fence allows you to cut multiple pieces to the same length. This stop is reversible, giving you two settings.

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Storage Case

Organize your collection of DVDs in style with this easy-to-build, versatile storage case.

It doesn't take long to build up a rather sizable collection of DVDs. But the challenge is keeping them all organized and neatly stored. That's just one of the reasons 1 like the DVD storage case you see in the photo above.

Another is that it's easy to build.The few simple joints you need to make can all be done at the router table.

The final thing that makes this project unique is the design of the case.

You can set the case horizontally (photo above) and stack a couple together so they'll look like an old library card catalog. Or stand a single case on end (photo at left) where it resembles a miniature filing cabinet.

Regardless of its position, the drawers slip in place smoothly. And your collection stays organized so you'll always be able to find the DVD you're looking for.

▲ The storage case works just as well vertically. After standing it on end, just give the drawers a quarter turn, and then slide them back in place

CON!

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 22"Wx 1lVa"D x 7K"H

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Top and bottom are glued up panels

'A' hardboard back fits into rabbet in the back of case

Dados in top and bottom make for a sturdy case and easy assembly

Brass bin pulls

Locking rabbet joinery is cut on router table. See page 21

Top and bottom are glued up panels

'A' hardboard back fits into rabbet in the back of case

Dados in top and bottom make for a sturdy case and easy assembly

Brass bin pulls

Locking rabbet joinery is cut on router table. See page 21

False frame applied to drawer front

NOTE: Drawers are designed to fit in case horizontally or vertically. See photo on page 16

False frame applied to drawer front

NOTE: Drawers are designed to fit in case horizontally or vertically. See photo on page 16

Case sides and dividers sit proud of top and bottom

NOTE:

Case back fits into rabbet routed in case sides, top, and bottom, see page 19

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NOTE:

Case back fits into rabbet routed in case sides, top, and bottom, see page 19

As you can see in the drawing above, the storage case is nothing more than a box with a couple of dividers. The key to making the box is creating perfectly square openings so that the drawers will fit the case whether it's sitting horizontally or vertically.

To do this, I started by cutting the top and bottom to final size and then headed to the router table. The router is the best choice for making the dadoes that the sides and dividers of the case will fit into.

Since you'll see the dado at the front of the case, a straight bit will cut a smooth, clean bottom and create a tight-fitting joint. The next page shows you how this is done.

STOPPED RABBETS. While you're at the router table, you'll want to rout a rabbet along the back edge of both the top and bottom. It's sized to accept the back of the case (detail 'b'). Just be sure to start and stop the rabbet without routing through the ends of the top and bottom.

At this point, you can set the top and bottom aside and work on the case sides and dividers. What's important to note here is that the sides are a Vi" wider. This allows for a rabbet along the back edge to hold the back of the case (detail 'a'). And both the sides and dividers are sized to project slightly ('/s") past the front edge of the top and bottom.

You're just about ready to assemble the case. But first you'll need to ease the sharp edges by routing or sanding a small roundover on the front edges of the sides and dividers, as well as the ends of the top and bottom, as shown in detail 'c' and on the opposite page.

Finally, if you're building more than one case, detail'd' and page 31 show you the steps to take to join them together. Once that's complete, you can glue up the case and install the hardboard back.

How To;

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