Factuid

Deep in wood, and like all wood turners I love finding it and delivering it to the world. So writes 83-year-old master turner Rude Osolnik in Ihe prologue to his new book, Rude Osolnik A Life Turning Wood (Crescent Hill Books, 1997). Mainly a biography, it Includes color photos of his work and a chapter on his turning techniques. The regular edition is 40. A signed limited edition, accompanied by a candlestick Osolnik turned, is available for 225. (See photo, below.) To order, call (800)...

Mixing Shellac

Weigh the shellac flakes and pour them into the denatured alcohol. Stir and let it sit. Stir the mixture, and let it completely dissolve overnight. Consistency, Add alcohol until the shellac runs off a brush like apple juice. The shelf life of homemade shellac varies from a lew months to more than a year, depending on the quality of the product you use and the conditions of storage. Keep ir in a glass container widi a tight lid, in a cool dry spot, to make it last. Store-bought...

Sharpening Chisels And Plane Blades

To flatten and smooth the back Now hone the bezel. The honing angle is easy to maintain of a chisel or a plane blade, keep the metal flat on the when you sharpen with a side-to-side motion instead sandpaper and use successively finer grits. ing and produce shavings fine enough to read through. II you re still not satisfied, 2,000-grit paper will rake you into Use a brush to sweep away any loose abrasive particles every time you move from one grit to another. If coarser...

Japanese Tool Museum

If you're interested in Japanese woodworking traditions. or just want to see some ot the finest tools ever made visit the Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum in Kobe, Japan, The museum features some 10,000 woodworking tools from various historical periods going back to the Stone Aye. Exhibits at the museum are in English and other languages. I he address is 18-25, 4-chomo Nakayamatedori, Chuoku, Kobe, Japan phone (078) 242-0216. not just ill 1 L lip are. wtom& b, American Woodworker is now the...

Just Finishing

Coats with 0000 steel wool or an ultra fine abrasive pad. On large-pore woods, you can wet-sand the second and or third coat of Danish oil onto the surface with 400- or 600-grit wet-and-dry sandpaper. This will create a slurry ol Danish oil and sanding swarf that will help fill the pores of the wood. Wipe off any excess after about 15 minutes and let it dry overnight, I advise against wet-sanding if your project has contrasting woods, though, because the slurry can darken lighter woods. For a...

Applying And Smoothing Shellac

Wipe the shellac unto the wood, but don't let it run into the joint. De-nib. Shellac will raise the wood grain slightly. Smooth the dried surface with worn sandpaper. retain as much whiteness as possible, you can substitute some diluted sanding sealer for the shellac. I'm 5i on and let it dry, then sand the surface thoroughly, to the point where you think that you have removed every trace of it. Sanding sealer takes much longer to dry, and you must sand ii thoroughly, rather than just...