Top Bottom

At this point, the sides of the house and cupola are a couple of eight-sided cylinders. Now you need to close up the ends of these cylinders. For the cupola, I simply cut a couple of octagonal hardboard panels (C) to fit in the rabbeted openings, see Figs. 2, 2a, and 2b. (Refer to page 23 for a tip on laying out an octagon.) These panels are simply glued in place.

The house gets a slightly different treatment. Like the cupola, a hard-board panel (D) is glued into the top opening, see Figs. 2 and 2a. But the bottom panel (E) is made out of 3/4M-thick stock, see drawing at right.

After the panel is cut to an octagon, the top edge is rabbeted to create a shallow ledge, see detail 'a' at right The house simply sits on this ledge (so it can be removed for cleaning), and the lip created by the rabbet helps lock the sides in place, see Fig. 3b.

DIVIDERS. At this point the inside of the birdhouse is just one big space. To create some "walls" inside the house, I added some dividers to partition the birdhouse into four separate "rooms."

The dividers (F) are V2"-thick pieces that are notched in the center so they interlock, see drawing at right and detail 'b'. After the dividers are glued together, they can be screwed to the bottom of the birdhouse.

BASE. With the dividers screwed to the bottom, a base (G) can be added. This is simply a 3/4M-thick octagonal panel, see drawing. A decorative cove is routed along the bottom edge of the base, see detail 'c'. Then the base is screwed to the bottom.

MOLDING. To dress up the bottom of the birdhouse, I attached some quarter-round molding to the bottom of the sides, see Fig. 3.

This base molding (H) is made by rounding over the edges of a yZ-thick piece and then ripping the molding to width, see Fig. 3a. After mitering the ends of the moldings at 22xh°, I attached themtothesidesofthehouse with glue and brads, see Fig. 3b.

Before moving on to building the roofs, the cupola is glued to the top of the main house. Layout lines drawn on the top panel of the house will help to center the cupola on the birdhouse, see Fig. 3.

second: Screw bottom to base

#8x V/4" Fh brass woodscrew divider

note: Bottom and base are glued up from 3A"-thick stock

FIRST: Screw dividers to bottom second: Screw bottom to base

#8x V/4" Fh brass woodscrew

Refer to page 23 for tip on laying out an octagon

SIDE VIEW

SIDE VIEW

divider

Refer to page 23 for tip on laying out an octagon

Round over , edges of blank 1 then rip to 1- width

CROSS SECTION

CROSS SECTION

pj note: I Don't glue molding to bottom (e)

Layout line note:

Attach base molding to sides only base

Wire brad

Layout line note:

Attach base molding to sides only base pj note: I Don't glue molding to bottom (e)

If you want to paint the birdhouse, there are a couple of things to keep in mind. First oft make sure to use a good, exterior-grade paint and primer. (We used two coats of a latex paint over an alkyd primer.)

Second, if you're planning to paint the trim pieces before attaching them to the birdhouse, keep in mind that it's best to leave any gluing surfaces unpainted.

TOP VIEW

4V2"

Lower Roof Assembly

END VIEW

UPPER ROOF SUPPORT BLOCK

LOWER ROOF SUPPORT BLOCK

Upper Roof Assembly

4V2"

Lower Roof Assembly

END VIEW

TOP VIEW

TOP VIEW

NOTE:

Sand small chamfer on edge of roof pieces for ridge pieces before assembly

END VIEW

Roof & Trim

The birdhouse actually has two roofs — a lower roof and an upper roof. And except for their length, the individual pieces for each roof are identical, see drawing above.

But building the roof requires more patience and care than any other part of the birdhouse. That's because unlike the straight sides of the bird-house, there's a 30° slope to the roof. So the edges of the roof pieces are both beveled and mitered — a compound miter. This can make cutting and fitting these pieces together a little tricky. (For more on cutting the roof pieces, refer to the article on stave construction on page 32.)

Like the sides of the birdhouse, the roof pieces start off as a couple of long blanks with V-grooves routed on one side, see drawing in margin above. Then the top and bottom edges of each blank are beveled at 30° to allow the roof pieces to fit up against the sides of the birdhouse, see Figs. 4 and 4a. After this is done, the individual upper and lower roof pieces (I, J) can be cut to rough length. (Shop Note: I cut my pieces about 1" longer than the final length.)

The compound miters on the ends of the roof pieces are made by tilting the saw blade 11° and angling the miter gauge to cut a 193/4° miter, see Fig. 5. (For most saws, this means setting your miter gauge to 70y4°.)

Before gluing the individual roof pieces together, a small chamfer is sanded on the ends of each piece to create a V-groove for some trim pieces that will be added later, see drawing above and detail 'c' on opposite page.

FINIAL BASE. The roof pieces are glued up into two separate assemblies (for more on this procedure, see page 23). But before they can be added to the birdhouse, there are a few support pieces that need to be built. First, I

Glue up blank

bevel on edge of blank

SECOND:

Rip blank to width and cut pieces to length

bevel on edge of blank

SECOND:

Rip blank to width and cut pieces to length

Tilt blade

Rip 30° bevel on top and bottom edges of roof pieces

Tilt blade

SECOND: Miter right side of blanks at 19BA°, see detail 'b' .

FIRST: Miter left side of all roof / blanks at/m 19%° /f

Tilt blade

vClamp stop block to fence

Finial

NOTE: Horizontal and verfiele trim pieces are Vs" thick and Va" wide

RIDGE BOARD

VERTICAL

TRIM

Finial made a base (K) for the finial. This is nothing more than a glued-up blank cut to an octagonal shape, see detail 'a' on opposite page. After cutting the base to length, it gets glued to the top of the cupola, see drawing.

ROOF SUPPORT BLOCKS. Next, I made some roof support blocks to support the peak of the roof. To make these, I simply ripped a bevel along the edge of a piece of 3A' '-thick stock, see detail 'b' on page 28. Then I ripped the blank to width and cut the individual blocks to length. The upper roof support blocks (L) are 3A" long and the lower roof support blocks (M) are 21A" long. These are glued to the side of the cupola (A) and finial base (K).

With the support blocks glued in place, the roof assemblies can be added. First I glued the lower roof in place and then the upper roof. Now you're ready to start adding all the trim pieces.

TRIM. The trim does more than add decoration to the birdhouse. It also helps to cover any gaps where two parts of the house meet I started by adding the horizontal trim (N). These pieces are just some W x W strips, mitered on the ends at 22xff to fit around the sides of the house. They're glued to the sides of the cupola just above the lower roof.

The corners of the house and cupola are covered with pairs of vertical trim pieces (O). These are also made from W x '/41' strips, but they're beveled 221A°on one edge instead of

NOTE: Horizontal and verfiele trim pieces are Vs" thick and Va" wide

RIDGE BOARD

the end. Then they're glued together and trimmed to length before being glued in place, see detail 'b' above.

After gluing the vertical trim in place, I made the ridge boards (P). These are nothing more than 3/i6"-dia. dowels that are cut to fit in the grooves between the roof pieces, see detail 'c'. The ends of the ridge boards are chamfered lightly with sandpaper and then glued in place.

DOOR FRAMES. The trim that frames the openings of the birdhouse is made up of four separate pieces — a top

VERTICAL

TRIM

All are cut from W-thick stock, see Fig. 6. Working on top of a flat surface, I glued up the pieces into individual frames before attaching them to the sides, see detail 'a' above.

FINIAL. The crowning touch of the birdhouse is a finial. (I used a store-bought finial.) Just drill a y4"-dia. hole in the bottom of the finial as well as the top of the finial base. Then the finial can be secured to the base with a short length of dowel and some glue, see Figs. 7 and 7a.

DOOR FRAME TOP

DOOR FRAME SIDE

NOTE: All door frame pieces are Va" thick

FRAME BOTTOM

DOOR FRAME TOP

DOOR FRAME SIDE

NOTE: All door frame pieces are Va" thick

FRAME BOTTOM

DOOR FRAME TOP PROFILE

7 square equals Va"

DOOR FRAME TOP PROFILE

7 square equals Va"

1%"-dia. finial

CROSS SECTION

NOTE: Drill 1/a"-dia. hole 3/a" deep in finial and base

1%"-dia. finial

NOTE: Drill 1/a"-dia. hole 3/a" deep in finial and base

CROSS SECTION

Post

Abirdhouse this nice deserves a special resting place. So I took the time to make a nice mounting post

I started by making an octagonal post to match the octagonal shape of the birdhouse. This post (T) starts off as a 4x4 piece of dimensional lumber. Then I ripped a 45° bevel on all four corners of the post to create an octagon, see drawing.

BRACKETS. To provide a wide base of support for the birdhouse, I made four mounting brackets (U), see drawing. These get screwed to the sides of the post and the base of the birdhouse.

The brackets are made from 3A"-thick blanks. I made a template to lay out the profile, see detail 'a'. Then after cutting the curves and sanding them smooth, I routed stopped chamfers on the edges, see Figs. 8 and 8a.

To mount the support brackets, I drilled counterbored shank holes for some woodscrews, see detail 'a' above. Then I screwed the brackets to the post and the base of the bird-house to the brackets. After setting the post in concrete, I set the bird-house on top of the base. El

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES

A Cupola Sides (8) 1/2 x 3 - 4 DTopPanei(l) ^Hdbd.-lis/iexll9^

B House Sides (8) 1/2 x 5 - 6 E Bottom Panel (1)% x 14 - 14

C Cupola Panels (2) 1/4 Hdbd. - 6% x 6% F Dividers (2) V2 x 51/2 - 11

CUTTING DIAGRAM

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar (planed toV/-thick)

b

b

b

b

b

b

b

b

'WMMMh

1x4 - 2' Redwood or Cedar

1x4 - 2' Redwood or Cedar

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar (planed to V2"-thick)

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar (planed to V2"-thick)

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar (planed to V2"-thick)

e

e

e

' j//////

WM^WMM-.

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar

Based)

Base Molding (8) Upper Roof (8) Lower Roof (8) Finial Base (1)

3/4 x 131/2 - 13V2 V2 x % - 61/2(rgh.) 1/2 x 4V2 - 51/2 (rgh.) 1/2 x 41/2 - 71/2(rgh.) 27/l6 X 2^/16 - 21/s

L Upr. Roof Blocks (8)% x 11/4 - 3A M Lwr. Roof Blocks (8)% x VA - 21/2

N Horizontal Trim

O Vertical Trim

P Ridge Boards (16)

R Door Bottom (4)

U Brackets (4)

1/s x Vn - 36 lin. in. Vs x 14 -160 lin. in. 3/i6-dia. x 5 1/4 x 3/4 - 31/4 1/4 x 3/s - 31/4 1/4 X 3/8 - 21/2 31/2x3!/2 (length varies) 3/4 X 3V2 - 6

*Also Needed: One 2' x 2' sheet of Vc." hardboard, 3/i6"-dia. dowels for ridge boards, and one 4x4 redwood or cedar post (length to suit).

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES

A House Sides (8) 1/2 x 5 - 6 B Top Panel (1) 1/4hdbd -119/i6x119/ie C Bottom Panel (1) 3A x 14 - 14 D Dividers (2) 1/2 x 51/2 - 11 E Base Molding (8) 1/2 x 5/s - 61/2 (rgh.) F Vertical Trim 1/8 x V4 - 100 lin. G Door Tops (4) V4x3/4-3V4 H Door Bottoms (4) 1/4 x % - 3Va I Door Sides (8) 1/4 x % - 21/2

CUTTING DIAGRAM

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar (planed to V2"-thick)

A A A A A A A

A

wmM///^/-

1x6 - 6' Redwood or Cedar F

C

C

C

■ . .T,. ., ,, ,,/ " , Y/////

*Also Needed: One piece of 1A" hardboard for Top Panel

1x6-2' Redwood or Cedar (planed to V2"-thick)

*Also Needed: One piece of 1A" hardboard for Top Panel

1x6-2' Redwood or Cedar (planed to V2"-thick)

Glue new bottom to top of lower story note: New level is sandwiched between existing house and base

Do not bevel top edge of new side pieces

Glue new bottom to top of lower story note: New level is sandwiched between existing house and base

Do not bevel top edge of new side pieces

Double-Decker Birdhouse

If you want to turn your backyard into a real hangout for the local bird population, you can double the housing capacity of your birdhouse by "adding on" another story.

Turning the birdhouse into a double decker is simply a matter of lifting the house off the base and adding an extra level. And building this additional story is also simple — the parts are the same as those used on the original house. Shop Note: Although it's easier to build the extra story at the same time you're building the rest of the birdhouse, it isn't essential — the additional story can be built separately and added later if you want.

The extra story will actually become the "ground floor" of the bird-house, utilizing the existing bottom, base, and dividers. The original house then sits on a new bottom panel that is glued to the top of the extra story, see Figs. 9 and 9a.

To build the extra story, you'll need to start by making an extra set of side pieces (A). These are identical to the sides used on the original house with one exception. Since there won't be a roof on this level, the top edge of the sides isn't beveled. However, you will still need to cut a rabbet on the inside edge of these pieces to hold a hardboard panel, see Fig. 9a.

After gluing up the side pieces, you can cut a top panel (B) out of 1/4"

hardboard and glue it into the rabbeted opening. Then you can make the base molding (E) and attach it to the sides with glue and brads.

DIVIDERS & BOTTOM. The dividers (D) are screwed to the new bottom panel (C). This assembly is then glued to the top of the new story.

TRIM. The last step to finish the extra story is to add the trim pieces. The vertical trim (F) is added first Then the door frames are glued onto the sides around the opening. Finally, the extra story can be set in place, and then the original house set on top of it. El

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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