Fitting Legs To Rockers

■ After cutting the legs of the Oak Rocking Chair (shown on page 6), I turned the chair over and set the rockers on the legs.

But there was a problem. After cutting the bottom of the legs square, they needed to be sanded to a slight arc to match the curve of the rockers.

To prevent over-sanding, I used the rockers like giant sanding blocks. This way, the legs can be sanded to perfectly match the curve of the rockers.

To do this, attach adhesive-backed sandpaper to each rocker where the legs will join the rocker, see Fig. 1.

Now place one of the rockers on its corresponding legs and gently sand the legs until they match the arc, see Fig. 2.

APPLY ADHESIVE-BACKED 100-GR1T SANDPAPER TO ROCKERS

APPLY ADHESIVE-BACKED 100-GR1T SANDPAPER TO ROCKERS

SPLINES

■ How tight should a spline be? When dry assembling the joint, if you can't push the spline in easily with your fingers, it will be too tight when there's glue in the joint So the spline needs to be thinner. If the spline falls out when turned over, it's too loose to hold the joint together.

SPLINE SHOULD

SUDE INTO KERF

WITH LIGHT HAND^-^

PRESSURE

At---

----

SPLINE

ADJUSTABLE TRIANGLE

■ To cut accurate angles with the miter gauge, I don't rely on its degree-markings — the lines are too thick to set it very accurately. Instead, I use an adjustable triangle. Its hairline markings are much finer and more accurate than those on most miter gauges.

adjustable triangle. This clear plastic triangle is made of two pieces: a right-angle base and an adjustable arm, see Fig. 1. The arm can be set at any point between 0* and 90' in half-degrees. Each hairline marks two relative angles (for example, 30760°, 20770') which makes setting angles much easier.

setting miter gauge. To use the triangle, the arm is locked at the desired angle by tightening a locking nut, see Fig. 1.

Then place the adjustable arm against the left side of the saw blade, see Fig. 2. (Note: Make sure the arm rests between the teeth. The set of the teeth can

change the angle.) Then align the miter gauge with the base of the triangle and lock it down.

angles over 90". At times you have to make a cut so the angle between the miter gauge and the blade is greater than 90°, see Fig. 3. But you can't set the triangle greater than 90°. Here, you have to do some math.

First, subtract 90 from the angle needed and lock the tri angle at this number. For example, if you want this angle to be 120°, set the triangle at 30°.

Now place the base of the triangle against right side of the blade, move the miter gauge to the right slot, and align, see Fig. 4. Then move the miter gauge to the left slot and make the cut

Adjustable triangles are available at most art supply stores. Or see page 31 for other sources.

FIRST: SET TRIANGLE AT 30' AND AGAINST RIGHT SIDE OF BLADE

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