Shim Saver

■ I bought some brass shims from a woodworking mail order catalog to put between the blades of my stack dado set. They allow me to make very fine router and a flush trim bit

The only problem with this technique is that when trimming the pins off the first side of a corner, the tails on the adjacent side get in the way. There isn't a flat surface for the router to ride on. To create a flat surface, I use a piece of V&"-thick Masonite.

To do this, first cut a piece of adjustments to the width of cut.

But I soon discovered a problem. The shims are so thin they fall into the threads of the arbor on my table saw. And then the shims bind or get chewed up when I tighten the bolt.

Fortunately, there's a very simple solution. Put a couple of small dots of grease or Vaseline on each shim, see Fig. 1. This makes the shim stick to the blade and prevents it from falling into the threads of the arbor.

Alan Schwartz Gainesville, Florida

Masonite to fit between the protruding tails, see Fig. 1. Then attach it to the box with double-sided carpet tape, or clamp it if the clamp won't get in the way.

Now set the depth of the bit so the bearing rides below the protruding pins, see Fig. 2a. Then trim the pins flush in a series of light passes, see Fig. 2,

■ The on/off switch on a table saw should be easy to locate, even if you can't see it But the toggle switch on my contractor's saw is under the saw table, and

When the pins are flush, remove the Masonite and trim the ends of the tails, see Fig. 2b. Since the pins are now flush, they won't get in the way. So you won't need to use the Masonite.

Note: This is also a good way to trim finger and box joints.

Robert S. Burson Florissant, Missouri it's too small to find without leaning back to take a look.

To solve this problem, I made a simple switch extender, see Fig. 1. To do this, I bored a hole to fit the switch lever in the end of a 2" length of dowel, see Fig. la.

Then glue the dowel on the end of the switch lever with epoxy, hot melt glue, or another kind of gap-filling glue.

Now the toggle switch is easier to use, whether I can see it or not.

Clifford Hicks Brevard, NC

EXTRA LENGTH MAKES T^Vc /

SWITCH EASIER TO USE , I jti I

EXTRA LENGTH MAKES T^Vc /

SWITCH EASIER TO USE , I jti I

DRILL HOLE IN DOWEL TO FIT SWITCH LEVER

DRILL HOLE IN DOWEL TO FIT SWITCH LEVER

SWITCH EXTENDER

CUSTOM FITTING DADOES

■ Here's a neat technique for routing dadoes to exact size. All it takes is a router with a straight bit, and two guides, see photo.

To start, make the guides by gluing a hardwood fence to an oversize base of V4" Masonite, see Figs. 1 and la. Then trim the excess width off the base on one side of the fence, see Fig. la.

Note: Since bits are often not centered in the base plate of the router, hold the same side of the router against the fence when trimming the guides and routing the dadoes.

To rout a dado, first lay out one side of the dado on the work-piece. Then clamp one of the guides along that line.

The trick to getting the dado to exact size is to use the piece

that will fit in the dado as a spacer when positioning the second guide. (Or use a scrap piece of the same thickness.)

Position the spacer against the first guide. Then place the second guide against the spacer and clamp the second guide to the workpiece, see Fig. 2.

Rout the dado by running the router along one guide and back along the other, see Fig. 3.

Brett Anthony San Jose, California

Rocking Chair Pattern

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