Building the Base

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A base is little more than a plywood box. I angled the back and the front stiles to give the unit the appearance of being broadly based and very stable. And the buttress-like elements surely do contribute to the base unit's rigidity.

I planned from the start to paint the unit, so I glued solid-wood edge-banding to any exposed plywood edges. This process does add to the construction time, but probably no more than an hour.

You can make the base unit even simpler than it is. If

BENCH TOP ROUTER TABLE EXPLODED VIEW

BENCH TOP ROUTER TABLE EXPLODED VIEW

Edge-banding

Rear buttress

Back

Edge-banding

Front stile

Bottom

Edge-banding

Front stile

Bottom

Edge-banding

Rear buttress

Back

Cutting List

Part

Qty. Dimensions

Material

Bottom

1

Va" X 14'// X 26'//

Plywood

Ends

2

Va" X 10 Î6" X 10 W

Plywood

Back

1

3/«"X H:* X 21"

Plywood

Rear buttresses

2

Va" X 2Va" X 11"

Plywood

Front stiles

2

Va" X 11" X 4"

Plywood

Edge-banding

8

Va" X Vi" X 12"

Poplar

Edge-banding

2

Va- X Va" X 16"

Poplar

: Edge-banding

2

Va" X Va" X 28"

Poplar

Tabletop plies

2

lA" x 16" x 20"

Plywood

Edge-banding

2

1" X Va" X 1714"

Oak

Edge-banding

2

1"X Va" X 21M

Oak

Top surface

1

/.6" x 16" x 20"

Plastic laminate

Bottom surface

1

'Al" x 16" x 20"

Laminate backer

| Hinge straps

2

Va" X r X 12!*"

Oak

Fence

1

1" x 3" x 27Va"

Oak

1 Clamp blocks

2

VA" X l!4"x 3!^"

6d finish nails 2 dry wall screws, #6 X 1%" 4 drywall screws. #6 x 1 2 hex-head lag screws, %" x 2" 4 flat washers, %" I.D.

2 Dzus toggle latches; #DTL-802A from Reid Tool Supply Co. (800-253-0421)

2 Dzus strikes; #DTL-800-9 from Reid Tool Supply Co.

8 panhead wood screws, #6 x

2 toggle clamps, De-Sta-Co #TC-215-U

8 panhead screws. #8x1"

1 folding lid stay with mounting screws, right-side mount

1 fender washer, Ya" I.D.

2 plastic knobs. 1 Va" dia. with W-20 through insert; #DK-54 from Reid Tool Supply Co.

2 panhead screws, #6xl"

FRONT VIEW END VIEW BACK VIEW

to lock tabletop.

Guide a router along the Routing Straightedge (see page 75) to cut the dadoes in the bottom. Especially with a D-handled router, it is a quick operation. Hold the work with one hand, and guide the router with the other.

BENCHTOP ROUTER TABLE PLAN VIEWS

TOP VIEW BOTTOM VIEW

to lock tabletop.

FRONT VIEW END VIEW BACK VIEW

quick-and-dirty is your style, then forgo the edge-banding and the buttress-like stiles and back. A plain plywood box will do just fine.

1. Cut the parts. All the plywood parts except the ends are edge-banded to conceal the plies. I used birch plywood, but you can use BB-grade fir plywood since the base is painted. For the edge-banding, I used poplar, simply ripping a few sticks to the thickness and width specified by the Cutting List.

To determine the buttress angle on the back, on the rear buttresses, and on the front stiles, I laid out the back. Then I set a sliding T-bevel from the layout and used it to adjust the table saw miter gauge.

To safely cut out the stiles and buttresses, lay them out with the back on a plywood piece 11 X 37 inches. Lay out one stile on each end of the piece. Cut the angles, then reset the miter gauge square to crosscut the stiles from the oversized blank. Repeat the process to cut the buttresses from the blank.Then cut the angles on the back.

2. Edge-band the stiles, buttresses, and back.

Cut and glue strips of wood to the exposed edges of the stiles and back. You can avoid all the frustration of clamping the angled parts if you nail the edge-banding as well as glue it. Use 6d finish nails, and countersink them and putty over the heads.

After the glue has set. trim the edge-banding flush with the faces of the back and stiles. This goes easily if you use a router and the Rush-Trimming Baseplate on page 119.

3. Dado the bottom for the ends and back. The ends and back set into Vvinch-wide X '/»-inch-deep dadoes routed into die base. The drawing Bottom Layout shows where to cut the dadoes.

Guide a router along the Routing Straightedge (see page 75) to cut the dadoes in the bottom. Especially with a D-handled router, it is a quick operation. Hold the work with one hand, and guide the router with the other.

BOTTOM LAYOUT

SECTION VIEW

3&M

I016"

BOTTOM LAYOUT

&"-sq. edge-banding (Cut to fit and apply before assembling base.)

4. Edge-band the base. While it might seem easier toapplv this cdgc-banding after the base is assembled, you »ill then find that flush-trimming the edge-banding is somewhat problematic. The stiles will be in the way. So work sequentially around the bottom, measuring, cutting, and fitting the shon strips of wood to the plywood edges.

Begin by standing the stiles in position and scribing a line along each edge on the base. X-out the area between the lines; no edge-banding will be applied here.

Apply strips across the ends of the Ixjttom first.These «rips are mitered on both ends. Measure, miter, and apply them. You can clamp them while the glue sets, or instead drive a few finish nails to secure then». Next measure, miter, and apply short pieces between the front corners and the scribe marks on the edge. It is better to have these a tad long than have them be too short. They can be pared back with i chisel for a perfect fit. Finally, cut and apply the strip that to between the two stiles.

After the glue has set. trim the edge-banding (lush. Check how the stiles fit. If necessary, pare back the ends of the iding.

5. Rout the handgrip openings in the bottom.

Make a template to guide this cut. Lay out the opening on the ccnter of a 5-inch-wide X 16-inch-long piece of hard-board or plywood. Bore a 1-inch-diameter hole at each end. then saw out the remaining waste with a saber saw. Sand the edge of the opening smooth.

To rout the opening in the bottom, clamp the template to the workpiece. Fit a plunge router with a Vi6-inch-O.D. template guide and a '/»-inch straight bit. Rout out the waste. After the opening is cut, round-over the edges on both sides of the workpiece with a -Winch roundover bit.

6. Assemble the base unit. Glue and nail the parts together. Stan with the ends. Glue them into the dadoes. Then fit the back into place. Glue and nail it to the bottom and the ends. Glue and nail die buttresses and stiles in place last.

Go over the base, and countersink all the nails; then fill the holes. Sand the base. After the tablctop has been fitted— see Step 4 under "Building the Tablctop," below—apply primer, then a coat or two of paint inside and out.

ft S1

TOP VIEW BOTTOM VIEW Strike for t0M|e lalch:

position to fit.

Position to fit. Attach to base.

De-Sta-Co #TC-215-U toggle clamp

Commercial folding lid stay

FRONT VIEW

TABLETOP DETAIL

TOP VIEW BOTTOM VIEW Strike for t0M|e lalch:

position to fit.

Position to fit. Attach to base.

FRONT VIEW

2. Make the tablctop. Following the detailed instructions for making the Custom Router Table Top on page 156. make the tablctop shown in the drawings. The instructions there basically include these steps:

• Trim this core to square the edges.

• Apply oak edge-banding.Trim it flush, top and bottom.

• Apply plastic laminate to both top and bottom.Trim the laminate, and open up the router recess on the bottom.

• Bevel the edges of the tabletop.

3. Cut and shape the hinges. I made the hinges of oak. cutting them to the shape shown in the drawing Hinge Layout.

Cut the two oak workpieces to the dimensions specified by the Cutting List. Tape them together with masking

Cutting the hinge taper can be done safely on the table saw using a "carry board." With the two hinges taped together, clamp them to a scrap of plywood with a toggle clamp, as shown. The cut line should be aligned directly over the plywood's edge. Feed the jig along the rip fence, cutting off the waste.

4. Fit the hinges to the base unit. Bits of the back's "•buttresses'1 must be pared away to allow the hinges to nestle squarely against the base's ends. Hold a hinge against one side and mark along its lower edge on the but

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