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A reminder to collect all the ncccssary hardware before you begin is, to me, always appropriate. Some of the hardware-can be picked up at the local hardware store. But the jig won't work without the toggle clamps, and it is likely you will have to order them. At the same time, order the plastic-knobs. When the stuff arrives, get to work on the jig.

1. Cut the body parts. The jig's body, formed of the cop. face, and base, is made of thick hardwood. Ken used |i>inch maple; I used 1 Vt-inch poplar. Use what you have or can get your hands on economically. While the material you UK should be somewhere in the l-V« to 1 Vi realm, the specific thickness of the parts is relatively unimportant. (But remember to adjust dimensions if you do deviate from the lHtoch thickness shown in the various drawings.)

Joint and thickness 8/4 (eight-quarter) hardwood to IS inches. Rip and crosscut the body's components to the dimensions specified by the Cutting List

2. Glue up the jig body. Just glue the top to the edge of the face, and glue the bottom to the back of the ace. as indicated in the drawing Plan Views. There are no special tricks here, but do try to keep the body square as rou apply die clamps.

After the glue has cured and the clamps have been | «moved, scrape off any dried squeeze-out.Then joint the face and top to make these surfaces absolutely square to oic another. This is critical.

Cutting List

Part

Qty.

Dimensions

Material

Top

l

lfc"X 4fc"X 15ft'

Hardwood

Face

l

1 Va" X 6" X 15ft"

Hardwood

Base

i

Wa'X 3"X 15ft"

Hardwood

Horizontal workrest 1

1" X V/a" X 10ft"

Hardwood

Vertical workrest

1

1"X 2ft" X 7"

Hardwood

Sliding stops

2

Va" X r X 9"

2 plastic knobs. \Ya" dia. with 16 X 1 ft" steel stud; #DK-29 from Reid Tool Supply Co. (800-253-0421)

4 brass threaded inserts, H"-I6

2 plastic knobs. IW dia. with '/<"-20 X 1 ft" steel stud; #DK-20 from Reid Tool Supply Co.

2 brass threaded inserts, 20

1 toggle clamp (De-Sta-Co #TC-215-U) 4 panhead screws. #8 X VC

Make sure the front and back edges of the top arc parallel. This too is critical. If necessary, rip the back edge-to make it parallel.

PLAN VIEWS

TOP VIEW

15/2"

Plastic knob with 14"-20 X I '/<" stud (Reid #DK-20)

SIDE VIEW

FRONT VIEW

SIDE VIEW

FRONT VIEW

De-Sta-Co #TC-2I5-U toggle clamp

Plastic knob with

FRONT VIEW

Set Up for End Mortising

De-Sta-Co #TC-2I5-U toggle clamp

Plastic knob with W-16 X I Vi" stud (Reid #DK-29)

Plastic knob with W-16 X I Vi" stud (Reid #DK-29)

De-Sta-Co #TC-215-U toggle clamp

While it's not essential, you may want to score a center-line across the top. I find the centerline helps in setting up the jig at the beginning of each mortising project. Just measure 7^4 inches from cither end of the jig. and square a line across the top. I used a utility knife to score a shallow V-groovc. then inked in the line with an fine-tipped red marker.

3. Install the threaded inserts. Liv out locations of the threaded inserts in the face and top, as well as the two holes for the sliding-stop locating pins. The spots are shown in die drawing Parts Layouts.

A couple of caveats: In use. the sliding stops should contact the edge-guide rods. It is a good idea to set your plunge router—fitted with its edge guide—on the jig, and see if you need to tailor your jig to accommodate your router. If the rods aren't long enough, you will want to rip the jig top to make it narrower. And if the sliding stops, as positioned in the plans, touch the router rather than squarely contacting the rods, you will want to move them.

The locating-pin holes are lA inch in diameter. Drill them about I inch deep.

Drill pilots for the threaded inserts next. In the top arc the two inserts for the sliding stops. In the lace, there arc two holes for the horizontal workrest and two for the vertical workrest. If you don't know what diameter hole to

SLIDING STOP

!A" 20 threaded insert

'/V-dia. X Va" deep hole for locating pin

VERTICAL WORKREST

HORIZONTAL WORKREST

Dowel Jig Homemade Togle

SLIDING STOP

VERTICAL WORKREST

HORIZONTAL WORKREST

tore for the inserts, measure the root diameter of one with c&il calipers. (The root diameter is the diameter of the Aank inside the threads.) Note that there are two different sires of inserts required.

After the holes are bored, drive the inserts. You don't need an expensive insert tool; use a nut and bolt and a •Tench. Turn the nut onto die bolt, then add the insert. Jim the nut down against the insert, and start turning the insert into the pilot hole. Once you get the insert started, tee the wrench on the nut to turn the assembly.

4. Make the workrests. The Cutting List specifies the thickness of the workrests at 1 inch; make them thicker or thinner, as you wish. But in any case, the slots in the hori-amtal rest are easiest to rout, I think, if you work with a wide bond rather than one that's already ripped to finished width.

Rip a board to a width of about 6 inches, and crosscut iitoa lO&inch length. Lay out both the horizontal and vertical rests on it. Rout the slots with a plunge router equipped with an edge guide. Bore the holes in the vertical rest. Rip the two rests from the board, and crosscut the verticil rest to length.

5. Install the toggle clamps. Lay out the position of the toggle clamp on each rest. Drill pilot holes and fasten a damp to each rest with lour screws. No, you don't really need wo clamps; you can easily work with one clamp, r

PARTS LAYOUTS

!A" 20 threaded insert

'/V-dia. X Va" deep hole for locating pin

Use your drill press to drive threaded inserts.

With the insert threaded onto a bolt, and the bolt chucked in a drill press, it is easy to drive the insert square to the face of the jig. DONT turn the drill press on; turn the chuck by hand as you advance the quill. Turn two hex nuts onto the bolt and tighten one against the other, jamming them so neither will turn. Turn the insert into the bolt next. The jam nuts prevent the insert from working its way up the bolt as you turn the drill chuck.

H"-16 threaded inserts

H"-16 threaded inserts

The slots in the horizontal workrest can be routed with a plunge router with an edge guide, as shown. Work with a wider board than needed, so the router will be adequately supported, then rip it to the final width.

attaching it to whichever rest you are using. Bear in mind, tot), that you may need to shift the position of the toggle clamp, depending upon the width of the workpiccc being mortised, so its spindle doesn't interfere with the router Panhcad screws lend a stylish appearance to the jig (and I listed them in the Hardware List), but l-inch drywall screws arc more real-world.

6. Make the sliding stops. As with die rests, the stops are best made from a workpiece that's bigger than the finished stop. Lay out a stop along each edge of a 4- or 5-inch-wide board, and clamp it to the workbench so the areas to be slotted extend off the bench edge. With a plunge router equipped with a edge guide, cut the slots.

Crosscut the board to length, and rip the stops.

7. Install the workrest and the stops. Each workrest is attached to the jig body with studded plastic-knobs turned into the appropriate threaded inserts.

The sliding stops arc similarly attached. To keep each stop aligned. I used a hex-head bolt as a locating pin, inserting it through the slot into the appropriate hole in the jig top. Ken used dowels for this purpose but then glued them into the holes. Leaving the pins—whether bolts or dowels—loose allows you to sand or joint the jig top to "refresh" that surface. (For the sake of your jointer knives, make sure the inserts arc sunk well below the surface before doing this.)

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Wood Working 101

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Responses

  • emmanuel
    How to keep threaded rods from bending in router thickness jig?
    9 years ago
  • fabio
    How to drill holes in wood with router and jig?
    9 years ago

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