Jigs For Turning Spindle Dowel Ends

Tedswoodworking Plans

16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

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The jig presented here will take a blank up to 32 incho long. If you want a jig that will do a longer blank, or if you know that 32 inches is much too long for the needs yuu

DOWEL-TURNING JIG EXPLODED VIEW

Crank plate

DOWEL-TURNING JIG EXPLODED VIEW

Crank plate

Crank handle

anticipate, then modify the dimensions, making the jig. longer or shorter.

1. Cut the parts. I made my jig mostly from plywood leftovers.The dimensions of the part.s are specified by the Cutting last. Cut the base, sides, and ends for the box. as well as the baseplate for the router. 1 used a piece of acrylic for the baseplate.

2. Bore the spindle holes in the ends. Study the drawing Crank Layout. I made each end piece with a series of spindle holes so that several different diameters of dowel an be produced without necessarily remaking the end picco.f'or the jig to work properly, the axis of each hole in one end piece must march the axis of the corresponding hole in the other end piece.

Lay out the holes, and drill them on the drill press.

3. Assemble the box. This is as simple as lining up the parts, drilling pilot holes, and driving screws. I attached the sides to the base, then fitted the ends between tbesides. Make sure the sides and ends are flush around their top edges.

4. Make the crank. Study the drawing Crank Layout. The crank plate is v*-inch hardwood. It is basically a disk, though the width of the scrap I used was less than the diameter of the circle I routed. The crank is mounted on a '»-mch X 3-inch hanger bolt using a T-nut and two stop nuts. To accommodate both the crank plate and two nuts on the machine-threaded section of the hanger bolt, you have to drill a Vinch-dccp counterbore, as shown in the drawing.

Find a suitable scrap, about 4'A inches wide, and locatc thc centerpoint. With a -%-inch Forstncr bit. drill the counterbore on the centerpoint. Switch to a '/«-inch bit and drill through the work piece, making a pivot hole. Lay out and

Cutting List

Part

Qty.

Dimensions

Material

Base

l

w x 6" X 44"

Plywood

Sides

2

!/i" X 6H* X 34"

Plywood

Ends

2

y-r x 6" x 6"

Plywood

Baseplate

1

%m X 6" X 8V4"

Acrylic

Crank plate

1

va" X 4li" X 5"

Hardwood

Crank handle

1

Ü" dia. x 4"

Dowel

Guide strips

2

W X Va" X 6"

Hardwood

Locking-pin grip

1

W dia. X 2"

Dowel

Locking-pin shank

1

dia. x 2"

1 lag screw, 'A" X 2" 4-8 flat washers. 'A"

bore the 1 ¿-inch-diameter hole for the crank handle.

Set up the Trammel Baseplate (page 39) to cut a 2' > ineh-radius arc. Set the trammel's pivot in the center hole, and rout the shape of the crank plate. Having done that, redrill the pivot hole to a ~i6-inch diameter to accommodate the T-nut. Drive the T-nut in place. Glue the handle in place.

DOWEL TURNING JIG PLAN VIEWS

SECTION TOP VIEW

Hanging-up hole

Maximum dimensions for a blank

END VIEW SIDE VIEW

END VIEW

Tail end

34"

Crank end

Crank end

BOTTOM VIEW

CRANK LAYOUT

SECTION VIEW

FRONT VIEW

5"

%"-20 stop nut t Handle EmSB '/Adia. X 4" dowel

7i6M clearance hole

Crank plate

FRONT VIEW

5"

BACK VIEW

%"-20 stop nut t Handle EmSB '/Adia. X 4" dowel

SECTION VIEW

y*~-dia. X y«"-deep counterbore % ' 20 stop nut

7i6M clearance hole

Crank plate

BASEPLATE LAYOUT

1 Vi"-dia. bit hole

Mounting-screw hole

Hardwood

Guide strip

Clear acrylic

1 Vi"-dia. bit hole

Guide strip

Clear acrylic

Mounting-screw hole

Hardwood

Now bolt everything together. Thread a stop nut onto the hanger bolt; you'll need to grip the bolt in a pair of Vise-Grips and turn the nut with a wrench. Turn the nut as far Kit will go. Now turn the crank onto the bolt, tightening it against the stop nut. Add the second stop nut.

5. Make the baseplate. The baseplate is necessary for any router with a baseplate diameter under 7 inches, which b to say, darn near every router. It suspends the router on the top edges of the box, with the bit direcdy over die blank's axis. The guides glued to the baseplate trap the baseplate, allowing it to be slid from end to end but not side to side.

Cut the baseplate from '/«-inch material. I used a piece of acrylic so I could see the bit relatively easily, but plywood would also Ik suitable. (I don't think it s necessary to buy a piece of acrylic just for this application if you have usable scraps of plywood.) Use the router's factor)' baseplate as a pattern for drilling the mounting-screw holes and the bit opening. Attach the baseplate to the router.

To position the guide strips, which can be fashioned from scrap rippings. chuck a small-diameter straight bit or a V-grooving bit in the collet. Set the router on the jig. and align it directly above the holes in one end. Apply a little ghie to the guides, and apply them to the underside of the baseplate, tight against the sides of the box. Clamp them with spring clamps. (To attach the strips to my acrylic baseplate, I drove small screws through the baseplate into the guide strips.)

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