For a Table Saw Mounting

If you've got a router hanging from a tabic saw extension wing, © you can adapt the split fence to use with it. The following C directions and specifications arc for a split fence made to go ^ with the Table Saw Extension Router Table on page 183.

f/i table saw extension router table split fence plan views

Table Saw Fence Face

YS I

13 V2"

2Va'

TABLE SAW EXTENSION ROUTER TABLE SPLIT FENCE Cutting List

Part

Qty.

Dimensions

Material

Base

i

1'X3^ X 35"

Hardwood

Backs

2

1 Va" X 2" X 12"

Hardwood

Face plies

4

tt" X AYi" x 1 5"

Plywood

Clamp blocks

2

lVi-x 2y.6Mx V/i

Hardwood

Fulerums

2

I " dla. x 1 Va"

Hardwood dowel

Hardware

Plastic laminate. 2 pes. 5"x 16" each 4 toilet bolts. 'A" x2Ji"

4 plastic knobs. 4-prong, 154" dia. with J4" through threaded inserts; #DK-59 from Reid Tool Supply Co. (800-253-0421)

2 plastic wing knobs with &"-l6 threaded insert; #85J94 from Woodcraft Supply Co. (800-225-1153)

Vu"

The big difference between this fence and the one designed for a regular router table is the clamp block design. Here, the clamps are designed to pinch the round rip-fence rails. But the overall length of this fence is different. too. Check the Cutting List and Plan View drawings for the details.

If you are going to build this split fence, follow the step-by-step directions under the heading "Making the Fence' (beginning on page 237) except for Steps 4 and 5. Instead, follow these steps:

1. Cut the blanks. The clamps consist of an upper jaw. which is glued to the underside of the fence base, and a lower jaw. which is bolted to the fence. Both the upper and lower jaws arc formed from a single block of hardwood, as shown in the drawing Making Clamp Blocks.

Cut the two blanks required to the dimensions specified by the Cutting List. Rip a short piece of 1 -inch-diameter dowel in half, then crosscut two 1-inch-lengths of the dowel halves.

2. Bore the holes. Two holes are bored in cadi clamp blank. One is for the rail, and the diameter of this hole must match that of the fence rails on your table saw. The second hole is for the clamp bolt.

The first hole must be bored with a Forstncr bit so it can break the edge of the blank. The drawing specifics a l Vk-inch diameter; but before you drill this hole, check the making clamp blocks

Lower jaw

Rip the block in two. making the upper jaw Vs" thick (left). Rip the lower jaw, making it 1V2" thick (right).

Start with a block of straight-grained hardwood.

With a Forstner bit, drill a I W-dia. hole positioned to break through the edge, as shown.

Drill a H'-dla. hole for the clamping bolt.

Upper jaw

Start with a block of straight-grained hardwood.

With a Forstner bit, drill a I W-dia. hole positioned to break through the edge, as shown.

Drill a H'-dla. hole for the clamping bolt.

Lower jaw ft" X 41/2" bolt

Upper jaw

Rip the block in two. making the upper jaw Vs" thick (left). Rip the lower jaw, making it 1V2" thick (right).

Rip a l"-dia. dowel In half, and glue a piece to the lower jaw as a fulcrum.

diameter of your table saw's fence rails. Adjust the diameter of this hole, if necessary. Lay out the ccnterpoint of the hole on each blank. Position each blank carefully on the drill press, and bore the hole.

Chuck a vH-inch bit in the drill press.Lay out the location of the clamp-bolt hole, and drill one through each blank.

3. Cut the blocks. On the table saw. rip the blanks in two, forming the upper and lower jaws. Re-rip the lower jaw, reducing it to the final thickness.

4. Assemble the clamps. Begin by gluing and clamping the split dowel pieces, which serve as fulcrums, to die lower jaws, as shown in the drawing.Then glue and damp the upper jaw to the underside of the fence base.

When the glue has set and the clamps have been removed, bore the clamp-bolt hole through the fence base. Use the hole in the upper jaw as a guide, of course.

Insert a Va-inch X 4'/2-inch carriage bolt through «he-lower jaw. then through the fence. Secure the assembly with a large plastic wing knob. If you want to ensure that the pws will open when you loosen the large plastic wing knob, fit a compression spring over the bolt before Inserting it in the fence.

Using the Split Fence 70

This fence is great because of die built-in clamps. Loosen C the big wing knobs about a turn, and the fence can be slid fp across the tabletop. Turn those wing knobs back, and it is damped securely. No separate clamps to fumble with. No . loose parts to fall or drop on the floor when you're trying ^ to hold a precise setting.

It is just a great all-purpose router table fence.

Near-Zero Clearance

The split fence is also great because it can be adjusted to accommodate an infinitude of bit sizes and settings. It isn't absolute zero-clearance; but in router woodworking, chasing zcro-clearancc is tantamount to chasing unicorns.

Probably you've seen ads for commercial fences with plastic inserts for you to make zero-clearance inserts. But think about how you chase a particular setup, when seeking a particular molding profile, for example.You set up and make a test cut. Then you raise or lower the bit a hair. Another test.The fence gets yuxed in or out. Another test. Another bit height adjustment. Another test.

Well, with each adjustment, the zero is going out of the clearance between the bit and the insert.

Clue the upper jaw to the fence base. Then extend the W hole through the fence base.

Fence base

Fence base

Adjust the facing spacing to suit the bit you are using. The split fence allows you to set the fence around the bit without having to actually cut out a space for it. You can move the fence faces close in to a small bit (left). then pull them out for a large one (right). By having the fences close to the bit on either side, they can provide backing for the work.

Adjust the facing spacing to suit the bit you are using. The split fence allows you to set the fence around the bit without having to actually cut out a space for it. You can move the fence faces close in to a small bit (left). then pull them out for a large one (right). By having the fences close to the bit on either side, they can provide backing for the work.

But okay, you do want to dose the gap between fence and bit as much as possible, and the fence's movable faces allow you to do that To adjust the gap between the faces, just loosen the four knobs that secure them. Slide the faces in toward the bit or out away from it.Then retighten the knobs.

Jointing

Your router can do a darn good job substituting for a jointer. Think seriously about using the router if

• you want to joint glue-laden materials like plywood or medium-density fiberboard (MDF);

• you want to joint a board or panel that's too big to maneuver when it's standing on edge;

• you have an especially small, blocky.or thin workpiece.

With this split fence, you can do the job on the router table.

To joint on a router table, all you have to do is adjust the split fence's two faces separately, to serve as infeed and out-feed supports.

The faces are seated against the fence backs, and the entire unit has been trued. So all you have to do is shim out the outfeed face. If you want to remove about inch of stock, try using some scraps of plastic laminate as shims. For

Shiming Tablesaw Fence

The split fence is easy to set up for jointing. Loosen the knobs securing the left-hand fence facing, and insert shims between the fence back and the facing (left). The thickness of the shims equals the amount of stock that will be removed in one pass. With this outfeed facing locked down, adjust the fence position so the out-feed facing is tangent to the bit's cutting edge. Check this with a straightedge, as shown above. You are then set to joint.

less of a eut, use scraps of backer or several thicknesses of card stock. For a heavier cut, rip some shims to the thick-acss you are aiming for. This is the easy part.

What's more challenging is aligning the fence properly with the bit.The outfeed half of the fence must be tangent to the bit's cutting edge. I do it this way:

1.Make a rough adjustment of the fence, and tighten one clamp.

2. Hold a straight edge against the outfeed face.

3. Fine-tune the fence position by moving its undamped end. Adjust it so the bit's cutting edge just grazes the straightedge.

•f.Tigluen the second clamp.

5.Tcst the setting by making a partial cut. Feed a lest piece by the bit until it nearly spans the entire fence. Switch off the router, and carefully check whether it is squarely against both faces of the fence. If it is, you are ready to joint the workpiccc.

The ideal bit. in all these cases, is a fairly heavy but well-balanced straight bit. Always use a '/¿-inch-shank bit if possible.

The biggest constraint in using the router for jointing is the bit's cutting-edge length. Hie typical straight bit has a I-inch cutting capacity, with longer ones extending that to V/j inches. With the latter bit, you can barely handle a 6/4 (six-quarter) board.

Two manufacturers—Freud and Amana—make '/a-inch straight bits with a 2,/J'-inch cutting length. This is the longest straight bit I've seen. Cutting judiciously, you

From a safety standpoint, the router may be the best tool for surfacing small workpieces. Maybe the piece is small and blocky. Maybe it's thin. These are the pieces that the jointer tends to jerk around or demolish, mauling your fingers in the process. Avoid this hazard—joint the piece on the router table.

should be able to joint up to 10/4 stock with this bit. And you can use it for many other straight-bit jobs. loo. Freud's bit is catalog number 12-130; Amana's is 45427.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

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There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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