Making the Baseplate

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5? The parts for this baseplate are included on the Cutting List, g even though, once the template is built, you don't need the baseplate anymore.

1. Cut the baseplate parts. The baseplate is a plywood square, larger than your plunge router's base. On the Cutting List, I spee'd it as a 10-inch square, while the drawing i; shows it as a 7-inch square. Start with the 10-inch square; after the necessary holes are bored and the indexing pin is installed, cut it down to the 7-inch-square size. (Of course, if your plunge router has a larger footprint, by all means increase the finished size of this baseplate.) The indexing pin is a 1-inch-long pictc of 1 H nth-diameter hardwood dowel.

2. Mount the baseplate blank on the router.

Remove the factory baseplate from your plunge router, and roughly center it in the baseplate blank. Transfer the mounting-screw locations. (Position the mounting holes so the router will be comfortably oriented when you are plunge-routing the holes in the template.) Drill the holes, countersink them, and attach the blank to the router in place of the stock baseplate.

Boring the indexing pin hole is easy if you plan ahead. Before removing the baseplate from the router, set the edge guide against the baseplate edge. That will ensure that both holes will be the same distance from the edge. Next, pencil an alignment mark for the router so the second hole will be 1 inch from the first, as shown. Then unscrew the baseplate and proceed to bore the hole.

3. Plunge-bore the bit opening and pin hole. The baseplate has two 1 ¿-inch-diameter holes in it. 1 inch apart: one for the bit, the other for the indexing pin. The holes must be the same distance from one edge of the baseplate.

To bore the bit opening, simply fit a '/2-inch straight hit into the router collet and plunge-bore the hole. Boring the indexing pin hole is a bit more involved.

Do this first: Fit the edge guide to the router, and snug it up against the plywood baseplate. Using the edge guide will ensure that the pin hole will be the same distance from that edge as the bit opening.

Now put a reference mark on the baseplate, so you know how far to move the router so the pin hole will be I inch from the bit opening. Butt a rule against the router base, and mark 1 inch from the base on the baseplate.

Next, remove the baseplate from the router and bond i t to a large scrap clamped to the workbench. Use carpet tape to secure the baseplate.

Finally, bore the pan hole. Set l.ie router on the baseplate. Snug its edge guide tight against the baseplate's edge. Slide the router to the mark penciled on the baseplate. Now switch on the router and plunge-bore the hole.

4. Complete the baseplate. Glue the pin in the pin hole.

If you want, cut down the baseplate to a manageable size. As you do this, make very sure that the reference edges (sec the baseplate drawing) remain parallel to the line between the bit opening and the pin. You can save yourself a little finagling later, when you bore the last hole in the template, if you make t hese edges equidistant from the bic opening now.

Mold off on remounting the baseplate on the router until after the first template hole is bored.

Making the Template

With the special baseplate completed, you can now turn to the template itself.

1. Cut the template blank. As with the special baseplate, the template blank should be a bit oversized. In this case, the reason has to do with getting the edges square to the centcrline of the template holes. So, despite what the Template Plan Views drawing suggests, cut the template to the size specified by the Cutting List.

2. Bore the first hole. Check the drawing, then layout the location of the first '/¿-inch-diameter hole in the column. Scribc the centcrline of the column of holes as you do this. Remember that you'll cut down the template after all the holes are bored, so lay out the first hole and the centcrline accordingly. Set the router over the hole location and plunge-bore it. (The Crosshair Baseplate can help you locate this hole precisely: see page 1.)

3. Clamp the fence in place. Now mount that incremental boring baseplate on the router. Set the router on the blank, and catch the pin in the first hole. Swing the

TEMPLATE PLAN VIEWS

TOP VIEW

END VIEW

De-Sta-Co toggle clamp #TC-207-U

END VIEW

De-Sta-Co toggle clamp #TC-207-U

First hole at each end is 'A- dia.

H"-16 brass threaded insert

EDGE VIEW

BOTTOM VIEW

Reid #DK-97— plastic knob with &"dia. x I Vi" stud

TOP VIEW

First hole at each end is 'A- dia.

H"-16 brass threaded insert

EDGE VIEW

BOTTOM VIEW

Reid #DK-97— plastic knob with &"dia. x I Vi" stud

00 o

router to align the bit over the centerlinc.

Slide the fence up to the baseplate's edge, and clamp it to the workpiece. The fence should be parallel to the centerlinc.

4. Plunge-bore the holes. Switch on the router and plunge-bore the second holc.The baseplate should be against the fence, and the indexing pin should be captured in the first hole you bored. Retract the bit and shift the router again.

Repeat the process until all the 1 ¿-inch holes are bored.

5- Plunge-bore the end holes. Switch to a '/i-inch-diameter bit. Bore the first of the two ! »-inch holes, with the base tight against the fence and the indexing bit caught in the last '/»-inch hole.

To bore the second '/«-inch hole, you may need to shift the fence slightly, depending upon the precision of your incremental boring baseplate. Both '/4-inch holes must be

Using the incremental boring baseplate:

This custom baseplate has a pin projecting from it a short distance from the bit opening {right). With that indexing pin captured in a hole, the router is essentially on a trammel and can only swing in an arc around that hole. Bring a fence against the router base, and you establish exactly where the next hole will be bored.

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Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

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