Using the Jig

The jig is really quite easy to set up and use. Don't be put off by the number of steps. Most take but a moment or two to accomplish.

1. Lay out a mortise. Use a scrap of the working stock, and outline the mortise exactly where it is to be cut Mark the centcdine across the mortise.

2. Clamp the jig to a workbench. Set the jig at the edge of the workbench, and clamp it with a couple of G clamps or quick-action bar clamps.

3- Set the workrest and toggle clamp. Adjust the workrest so the workpiece will be flush with the top of the jig. If you arc using the horizontal rest, make sure it is parallel to the top. If you are using the vertical rest, make sure it's perpendicular to the top.

Adjust the spindle on die toggle clamp as necessary. The clamp should snap smartly and hold the workpiece securely.

4. Clamp the workpiece to the jig. Set the test picce on the rest, and line up the centerline of the mortise with the ccntcrlinc scored across the jig. Snap die toggle clamp dosed.

5. Set the plunge depth stop. Chuck die appropriate bit in your plunge router. Zcrc>out the depth scale, then set the depdi stop for the depth of mortise you intend to rout.

6. Adjust the edge guide. Fit the edge guide to the router. Set the router on the jig, with the guide referencing the back edge of the top. Plunge the bit—with the router unplugged, of course—to the workpiece. With the edge guide loose on its rods, adjust the position of the router so the bit is centered within the mortise layout lines.Turn the bit by hand, and observe die cutting flutes to ensure that it really is centered. Slide the guide up against the jig's back edge, and tighten the locking knobs.

Move the router from side to side, with the guide firmly against the jig. The bit should remain centered widiin the mortise layout lines. If it does not, something is out of whack. Either the edges of Lie jig top are not parallel, or the faces of the test piece are not parallel, or the mortise layout is skewed.

7. Adjust the sliding stops. The lateral movement of the router is arrested when the edge guide rods contact the sliding stops. Move the router left or right to position the bit at the very end of the mortise. Slide the stop against the edge-guide rod on that side, and tighten its knob.

Slide t he router so the bit is poised at the other end of the mortise. Bring the stop against that side's rod, and tighten the knob.

8. Rout the test mortise. With the workpiece clamped in the fixture, and with the router all set up, rout the mortise.

Plunge-cut the ends of the mortise first. Doing this ensures that the ends of the mortise will be vertical.Then rout out the waste between the ends in a series of passes.

When you cut.bc sure you feed the router in the right direction, the one that uses the force of the bit rotation to pull the guide against the work.To do this, you've got to retract the bit between cutting passes. With the edge

SETTING UP ROUTER AND STOPS

1. Set the workpiece on the workrest, lining up the centerline on it with the centerline on the jig.

2. Move the router to position the bit exactly between the layout lines for the mortise then lock down the edge guide.

3. Move the router to position the bit just inside the layout line at one end of the mortise and adjust the sliding stop against the edge guide's rod.

4. Move the router to position the bit just inside the layout line at the other end of the mortise and adjust the other sliding stop against the edge guide's other rod.

MORTISE ROUTING SEQUENCE

SETTING UP ROUTER AND STOPS

2. Move the router to position the bit exactly between the layout lines for the mortise then lock down the edge guide.

3. Move the router to position the bit just inside the layout line at one end of the mortise and adjust the sliding stop against the edge guide's rod.

4. Move the router to position the bit just inside the layout line at the other end of the mortise and adjust the other sliding stop against the edge guide's other rod.

MORTISE ROUTING SEQUENCE

I. Plunge-bore one end of the mortise to the full depth.

2. Plunge-bore the other end to the full depth.

3. Rout the waste from between the two holes, nibbling about V*" deeper with each pass.

4. Continue this process until the mortise is completed.

9. Pencil positioning marks 011 the jig. Assuming the mortise test turns out just right, you have one more setup task to complete before tackling the actual work-pieces. You need to decide what layout marks you will use to position the succession of workpieces being mortised.

guide opposite you. riding along the jig top's back edge, you make the cutting pass by moving the router right to left. Then retract the bit clear of the work and slide the router back to the right. Then replunge the bit for another cutting pass.

9. Pencil positioning marks 011 the jig. Assuming the mortise test turns out just right, you have one more setup task to complete before tackling the actual work-pieces. You need to decide what layout marks you will use to position the succession of workpieces being mortised.

The essential layout mark is the center (from end to end) of the mortise. There's a centermark on the jig, and you line up the layout mark on the workpiece with it. Because of how you've set up the jig and the router, the mortise will be perfectly positioned.

Routing a mortise calls for a series of light cuts. Plunge-bore the two ends first to establish the parameters of the finished mortise. Then plunge the bit about V* inch and make a pass, cutting from one end to the other. Retract the bit free of the work, and return to the starting point. Plunge a little deeper for the next pass. Repeal this routine until the mortise is cut to its final depth.

You DO NOT need to completely lay out each and every mortise!

You can mark the ccntcrlinc of each mortise, then align the workpiece mark with the scored ccntcrlinc on the jig Hut it may be easier to lay out the ends of each mortise, you can measure and mark one workpiece. then stack them and transfer the marks with a square and a pencil.

Given diis approach, you need to lightly pencil on the jig top the ends of the mortise. So before moving the test mortise, use a square and pcncil to make these marks on the jig top.

Loose-tenon joints are what the vertical workrest is for. To make a loose-tenon joint, you rout mortises in both rail and stile, then insert a separate piece as the tenon when the joint is assembled. Typically, the problem is holding the rail so a mortise can be routed into its end. As shown here, the vertical workrest solves that problem.

Mortising a table leg isn't any different, really, than mortising a door stile. The toggle clamp's spindle is easily adjusted to accommodate the greater thickness of the leg.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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