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Tedswoodworking Plans

16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

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1. Cut the plywood parts. All of the table's wooden pans, exccpt the edge banding and the dowels for the T-nut inserts, arc plywood. 1 used cabinet-grade birch plywood throughout. Just run down the Cutting List, cutting the pans to the sizes specified.

I have found it useful to make the pans that will he layered together a little oversized, so 1 can square and smooth the edges—and square the resulting blanks in the process—on the table saw. The sizes specified arc the finished sizes.

2. Glue up the sides, tabletop, and mounting board. These parts are a hill inch thick. Rather than special-order a sheet of 1-inch plywood, I face-glued picces of '/j-inch plywood to make these pans. Ordinary' yellow glue is all it takes.

Before gluing the mounting board layers together, dado the pieces to create channels for the adjusting rods. Use a /+-inch straight bit. and cut no more than Y\t, inch deep, 1 Vt inches in from each end of both picces. (If you're working wiith oversized pieces.

Dadoing the mounting hoard layers before glue-up creates a channel for the adjustment rods, Unless you have a '/ib-inch straight bit, the easiest way to cut these dadoes is to use a Yt-inch straight and to guide a router fitted with a fractionating baseplate along a fence clamped to the work. (Sec "Fractionating Baseplate" on page 230for details on making this baseplate.) Make one pass to cut the 'A-inch-wide dado, then turn the router and make a pass to widen the dado to Vu> inch.

Dadoing the mounting hoard layers before glue-up creates a channel for the adjustment rods, Unless you have a '/ib-inch straight bit, the easiest way to cut these dadoes is to use a Yt-inch straight and to guide a router fitted with a fractionating baseplate along a fence clamped to the work. (Sec "Fractionating Baseplate" on page 230for details on making this baseplate.) Make one pass to cut the 'A-inch-wide dado, then turn the router and make a pass to widen the dado to Vu> inch.

bear in mind that the dadoes need to be I K» inches from the trimmed ends.) When you glue up the pieces, the dadoes should be on the inside and should line up. forming two channels from the top edge through to the bottom edge. Mark the locations of these channels on the faces of the glucd-up blank.

3. Assemble the base unit.

The base unit's joinery is pretty-simple. The sides and front fit into shallow dadoes in the base—only V\ inch deep—and the front is trapped between the sides, which are locked in shallow dadoes. The back merely butts against the base and sides, and is fastened with glue and several drywall screws.

4. Complete the blanks for the tabletop and mounting board. After the glue is dry and the clamps arc off, square up these two parts on the table saw. Lay out and cut the bit notch in the tabletop.

Glue the edge banding in place next. 1 used maple, but you can use oak or any other hardwood. Prepare about 12 feet of Winch by 1 Winch stock. Cut the banding to fit. mitcr-ing the comcrs. Glue it to the edges with the excess width roughly split between the faccs; you want to be able to trim the banding flush with the faces on both sides.

Use a flush-trimming bit to finish the edge banding. The only area you can't reach with the bit is the bit notch in the tabletop. I did this area with a plane, but you could also screw the flush-trimming base to the laminate trimmer and do this little area with a straight bit. (See "I'lush-Trimming Baseplate" on page 187 for plans for this baseplate.)

Before you cover them with laminate, transfer the marks locating the kerfs in the mounting board to the edge.

Now cement the plastic laminate and backer to the two blanks. Cut the laminate oversized so when it is cemented in place, you have excess all around to trim off. (See the chapters "Working Laminates" and "Router Table Design" for additional details on applying plastic laminate.) In one operation, trim the excess laminate away and finish the blanks by routing a slight chamfer around the edges with a 45-degree chamfer bit.

5. Make the T-nut inserts. To attach the tabletop to the base unit and to mount the adjusters, I made "threaded insens" using T-nuts and K-inch dowel. Real threaded insens don't always work in the edges of plywood; they often force out the sides, creating lumps on the faces. Drill a >itrinch hole through a 2-inch length of dowel. With a backsaw or on the band saw. kerf one end of the dowel so it won't split when you drive the T-nut into place.

T- NUT INSERTS

T- NUT INSERTS

To drill the dowels to make T-nut inserts, you need to de\ise a method of holding the dowels. Clamp a scrap board to the drill press table with its edge under the center of the chuck. Use a Y+inch Forstner bil to drill a half-hole through it. Sow attach a second scrap to the drill press with a single screw, so you can swing it against the first hoard. Drop a dowel into the half-hole, and pinch it tightly with the swing arm, as shown. With a yi&-inch bit. drill the hole through the dowel.

To drill the dowels to make T-nut inserts, you need to de\ise a method of holding the dowels. Clamp a scrap board to the drill press table with its edge under the center of the chuck. Use a Y+inch Forstner bil to drill a half-hole through it. Sow attach a second scrap to the drill press with a single screw, so you can swing it against the first hoard. Drop a dowel into the half-hole, and pinch it tightly with the swing arm, as shown. With a yi&-inch bit. drill the hole through the dowel.

6. Install the tabletop. The tabletop is attached to the base unit with four flathead stove bolts direaded into T-nut insens.

First, set the tabletop in place. On the edge of the top, mark the approximate center of each side, so you can drill ihe required holes into the center of the 1-inch-thick sides. Use a try square and pencil to extend the mark across the table, then mark the hole locations, as indicated in T-Nut Inserts.

Take the unit to the drill press, and drill a Winch hole completely through the tabletop and into the base unit at each of the four spots. Switch to a countersink, and countersink each hole in the tabletop deep enough that the bolt heads will be just below die surface.

Remove the tabletop from the base. Chuck a Winch Forstner bit in the drill press. Using the holes left by the Winch bit as the center-points. drill four 2-inch-deep holes for the T-nut inserts. To allow the bolt shank to extend through the T-nut. drill the Winch hole a little deeper than the bottom of the Winch hole at each spot.

Spread glue on each T-nut insen, and put one in each hole. Be sure the T-nut is on the bottom of the insert. Don't be too generous with the glue: you don't want it to well up through the T-nut and clog the threads. When the glue is dry. sand the insen tops flush.

Set the top back in place and drive a bolt through each hole, fastening the top.

7. Install the mounting plate.

Lay the acrylic mounting plate on the mounting board, align it. then trace around it. Use a Winch straight bit to cut a groove around the inside

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Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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