Doors and Windows Continued

TUE CONSTRUCTION

OF A WINDOW

MUNTINS ARE STICKEO ON BOTH EDGES.

USE COPE-AND-3TICK JOINERY TO ASiEMftlE MUNTINS.

Making windows. The difference between making doors and making windows is the bit. A window sash bit (or bit set) will rout sticking with a profile and a rabbet for glass. The setups and steps hc the same as with cope-and-stlck bits: Do the sticking cuts, then cope the ends of the rails.

The drawing shows a 12-light storm window Fred made using a sish cutter.

T*o different window sash bit configurations are available. Cascade's SV window sash bit set (top) has separate bits for the stick and cope cuts. Eagle America sells a single hit for both cuts (bottom). To configure this bit for the cope cut, you remove the rabbet cutter and replace it with ibushing.

A sash bit (or set) makes window amstruction relatively easy. In addition to shaping the rails and stiles that frame the window, you can shape the narrow rttuntins that partition it. Here, short horizontal muntins are joined to t tall vertical one.

For curved work, Fred's plesiasaur is the ideal hold-down. Since you can't use the fence with curved work, you can't use the usual hold-down, which clamps to the fence. Position the plesiosaur to bridge the bit itself, with the hammerhead bearing on the work, as shown. The strip butted against the side of the hold-down keeps it from twisting out of position.

A light first pass can be set up by adjusting the fence position well ahead of the pilot bearing, as shown here, rather than by lowering the bit. This may be the only approach possible where the bit can't be lowered into the router's base area.

chapter "Router Table Accessories" for details on making the plesiosaur.)

On the horizontal router table, you won't need the fence, of course, but you will need the featherboards. Clamp them to the mounting board, just as you would to a fence. Remember that you will be feeding the work left to right on this table, and position the featherboards accordingly.

Making the cuts. With everything set up, start making the cuts. Cut the end grain first. This cut is most likely to cause tear-out. but any tear-out will almost surely be routed away when you make the long-grain cuts.

A number of joints other than the cope-and-stick can be used in frame-and-panel construction.

The big advantage of the cope-and-stick is the appearance of the decorative profile routed on the inside edge of the frame. Were you to assemble a frame and then rout the decorative profile, the prxv file would lack the crisp comers. Instead of being sharp and square, the transitions from rail to stile would be rounded. And any approach in which you make a stopped cut will also yield those rounded comers. The cope-and-stick seemingly is the only joinery that gives you those crisp comers. Seemingly.

See the joint described in the chapter "Splined Miter Joint." The miter is weak, but the splines reinforce it. And before cutting the miters, you can rout a decorative profile on the inner edges. Because of the nature of the miter, the profile cuts will meet in crisp, square comers.

Sec "Routing Mitered Half-Laps" on page 289. The mitered half-lap is inherently stronger than the miter joint, even one reinforced with splines. But you still can embellish the edges with a routed profile and have the profiles meet clean and square at the comers.

The strongest joint, especially for doors, is the mortise-and-tcnon. See the chapter "Mortise-and-Tenon Joints" for an explanation of how to use your router in making these joints. To incorporate the mortise-and-tenon into a cope-and-stick joint, use the loose-tenon variant. Cut a mortise into both the sticked piece and the coped piece. The loose tenon is a strip of wood that extends into both mortises. The thickness of the tenon should match the groove width. There's a photo of a mortise cut into a coped rail on page 214.

Raising panels on bolh the regular (left) and the horizontal router table (right) is remarkably similar. Set the bit, a horizontal raiser in the regular table, a vertical one in the horizontal table. Clamp a featherboard or two in place to hold the panel flat on the table and to prevent kickback. Then feed the work across the table.

Raising panels on bolh the regular (left) and the horizontal router table (right) is remarkably similar. Set the bit, a horizontal raiser in the regular table, a vertical one in the horizontal table. Clamp a featherboard or two in place to hold the panel flat on the table and to prevent kickback. Then feed the work across the table.

Make your first cut on every workpiece, then adjust the setup to increase the cut. Depending upon how you've set things up. that may involve moving the fence or merely raising the bit. Make a second pass on every piece, adjust the setup, and so forth.

When you arc all finished, you probably will need to sand the cuts lightly. Especially when cutting across the grain, the bit tends to lay the end grain down a little. The wood will feel smooth to the touch when you stroke one direction but rough when you stroke the other direction. A couple of light passes with a pad sandcr should take care of this.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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