Edge Miters

Edge miters lend themselves to a greater range of applications than do flat miters. You might find them in casework as well as framework. The scale of casework—the size of the individual pans—makes it worthwhile to find some practical ways of cutting spline slots with a hand-held router. Muscling a cabinet side along an angled router table fence may not be ;is easy as sliding a lightweight router and jig along the cabinet side. So, here are several options, beginning with the router table.

Router Table Fence

To cut spline slots in edge miters on the router table, you need a fence diat's canted at the same angle as the edge miter. Thus allows you to keep the reference face of the work-piece flat against the fence and have the cut surface flat on the router table.

There are two directions, of course, in which the fence can be angled. In one direction, the fence forms an acute angle with the tabletop. In the other, it forms an obtuse angle. Fred likes the acute-angle fence, simply because it traps the work, ensuring that the groove will be where he wants it. I see possibilities in both, largely because I can envision workpieccs that would be difficult to maneuver along almost any acutely angled fence. Let's take a look.

The acute-angle fence: Make a fence canted to 45 degrees from a straight, flat 2x4. and you'll have the fence that you'll use 90 percent of the time. Tilt your table saw to 45 degrees, and with the broad face flat on the saw table, rip one edge off the

2x4. (Obviously, if you are splining edge miters of some angle other than 45 degrees—the sides of a hexagonal or octagonal case, for example— your fence needs to be beveled at that angle.) On the band saw, cut the ends to form clamping ears on the ends of the fence, as shown in Acute-Angle Fence. Set up and clamp this fence as you would a conventional one.

Cutting through slots with this setup is as simple ¿e> napping the work in the crotch formed by the fence and the tabletop. then feeding it into the bit. As with the flat miters, an expendable push stick can help prevent tear-out that often comes when the bit exits the work, so long as it fits tightly against the edge of the work.

To cut stopped slots, mimic the flat miter slotting operation. That is. mark parallel tangents to the bit on the tabletop. Mark the ends of the desired slot on the work. Hold the work against the fence, tip the leading edge over the bit, align the mark on the work with the appropriate mark on the tabletop, and plunge the work onto the bit. Feed the work from right to left, cutting the slot. When the cut is done, tip the work up off the bit. The routine is easier to do than to describe.

Use the workpiece—or a beveled scrap of the working stock—to set the acute-angle fence. Adjust the bit to the desired height first. With one end of the fence clamped and the setup scrap trapped behind the bit, you can sight along the tabletop and fence and see exactly where the bit is going to cut. Position the fence so the slot will be whereyou want it.

Use the workpiece—or a beveled scrap of the working stock—to set the acute-angle fence. Adjust the bit to the desired height first. With one end of the fence clamped and the setup scrap trapped behind the bit, you can sight along the tabletop and fence and see exactly where the bit is going to cut. Position the fence so the slot will be whereyou want it.

Use the same setup scrap to mark the bit size on tape applied to the mounting plate. You can butt the wood against the cutting edge with' out damaging it, then scribe along the edge of the scrap on the tape.

,smape "clamping ears* on band saw.

,smape "clamping ears* on band saw.

acute-angle. FENCE guides spline cuts in edge miters

To make the cut, push one end of the work into the V formed by the fence and tabletop, and hold the work firmly against the fence. Line up the marks and tip the work onto the bit. Feed the work to the end of the cut, and tip it off the bit. The key is keeping the work up against the fence.

The slopped slot looks weird lie-cause of the way the bit enters and exits the workpiece. As long as the bit doesn't penetrate the work completely, you're okay. The joint will he secure.

To make the cut, push one end of the work into the V formed by the fence and tabletop, and hold the work firmly against the fence. Line up the marks and tip the work onto the bit. Feed the work to the end of the cut, and tip it off the bit. The key is keeping the work up against the fence.

The slopped slot looks weird lie-cause of the way the bit enters and exits the workpiece. As long as the bit doesn't penetrate the work completely, you're okay. The joint will he secure.

The obtuse-angle fence: Once in a while you have a workpiece that's a little too unwieldy for the acute-angle fence. That fence traps the bevel well enough, but you have to support the stock as well as feed along the fence. Here's one that helps you with your burden.

Make it from Winch plywood. Obtuse-Angle Fence gives the dimensions of the fence shown in the photo.

The obtuse-angle fence will support the workpiece for you, but you've got to clamp a trap fence opposite it (and parallel to it) to prevent the work from skidding down the fence, across the table-top, and onto the floor. A catch block clamped to the workpiece to ride along the top edge of the fence is a nice idea, but doesn't work terribly well. Hence the trap fence.

but you can modify them to suit your router table and the job you have to do.

Cut the fence to size and rip a bevel along one edge. The bevel, naturally, matches that of the work you arc going to spline; a 22l/2-degree angle is shown. That angle is half of a 45, so the braces are easily made by cutting on a diagonal any rectangular piece that's twice as long as it is wide. The base has to be long enough that it can be clamped—at the back or side of the tabletop.

Assemble the pieces with drywall screws.

To use this fence, position it so the slot will be where you want it in the edge of the workpiece. Clamp it to the table. To keep the work in placc, use a trap fence, as shown. All you have to do is lean the workpiece on

OBTUSE-ANCLE FENCE SUPPORTS THE STOCK AS IT GUIDES THE CUT

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Responses

  • vera
    How to cut 45 degrees cabinet?
    9 years ago

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