Problem Solver

Trammels imply circlcs. but some-limes you need only a piece of the circle—an arc. The trammels we've shown so far will help you lay out and cut arcs. But when you need one with a really radical radius, those trammels aren't bigenough.

Here's the solution.

Cut a trammel bar as long as the radius you need. Hinge it to a shop wall at one end. and position your workbench so the router, attached to the other end of the trammel bar. is supported. The hinge provides a secure pivot. Your trammel bar can be a strip of '/»-inch plywood. You need not be limited by the 8-foot length of a plywood sheet. Scab strips together to extend them. You need only be limited by the size of your shop. (And if that's too small for you. do the job outside!)

I made my own hinge using a couple of screw eyes turned into the wall. 1 round off the end of the trammel strip, as shown in Radical-Radiuf Arc-Cutting Trammel, and drill a hole in it. Slip the strip

A WALL-MOUNTED PIVOT YIELDS A, RADICAL-RADIUS ARC-CUTTIMG TRAMMEL

between the two screw eyes, drop a bolt through the holes, and the pivot is ready lor use.

Now you can put a pencil in the other end of the trammel to scribe the arc. then cut it with a saber saw or on the band saw. But 1 use this most often to make templates, and swinging the router on the trammel assures me of a much smoother arc than I would get by sawing it freehand. Then I use the template with a template guide or a pattern bit to actually shape the workpiece. (Sec the chapter "Template-Guided Work" for more on this technique.)

5. Drill and counterbore the pivot hole in die pivot block. The coun-terbore for the washer and nut on the bottom of the block shouldn't be too deep. The nut should be just a bit proud of the block's bottom surface, so it—and not the block— bars on the pivot plate.

6. To assemble the trammel, fit the T-nut into the pivot block. Slide the arm into the dovetail slot, and stick die threaded rod through the slot n the ami and into the T-nut. Turn it through the hole and tighten it in place with the nut. The end of the rod should project enough to catch in the pivot-plate hole, but not so much that it will bottom in that hole and thus mar the workpiece. (That would defeat the whole purpose of this trammel!) Turn the plastic knob onto the free end of the rod. Drill pilot holes, and screw the trammel arm to the transition block.

7. Cut the pivot plate from a scrap of acrylic. It must be square. Scribe diagonals to locate the centerpoint, then drill a Winch pivot hole there.

A router table affords a whole new range of possibilities. Obviously, the big difference is that you turn the workpiece instead of the router. Just place a nail, scrcw, or dowel in the tabletop as a pivot. Then set the stock on the pivot, and turn it to cut your circlcs or arcs.

In most cases, of course, you're not going to want to mess up your nice, smooth top. Instead of putting a hole in the tabletop itself, use a piece of scrap plywood or hardboard and either tape it or clamp it to the tabletop. Run the bit up through it. and install any kind of pivot you desire in this auxiliary top.

With the bit retracted, you slip the blank on the pivot. Hold the blank, switch on the router, and turn the micro-adjusting knob to raise the bit enough to engage the work. Turn the blank one full rotation; then, still holding the blank and with the router still running, reach under

If you are uncomfortable about the proximity of your fingers to the hit when routing out disks on the router table, use a pusher to move the workpiece. Tltis commercial pusher has a dense foam rubber sole that grips the work and won't let it slip. Here, the last corner is being trimmed off the workpiece.

If you are uncomfortable about the proximity of your fingers to the hit when routing out disks on the router table, use a pusher to move the workpiece. Tltis commercial pusher has a dense foam rubber sole that grips the work and won't let it slip. Here, the last corner is being trimmed off the workpiece.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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