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Using the router table without a bit guard is asking for injury. As with other power woodworking tools, a momentary lapse—a onetime happening—can cause an eon of misery and grief. Spinning at 22,000 rpm, a carbidc bit will cut flesh faster than it will rock maple.

Hang a bit guard on your fence. As you will sec elsewhere in this chapter, there are ways of equipping every fence with a bit guard. If you are doing work with a piloted bit, equip your router table with a bit guard as well as the staning pin.

shares many of acrylic's working characteristics, but it doesn't respond well to heating and thus isn't easy to bend.)

The adjustable shield is composed of a plastic baseplate, a plastic guard, and several wooden spacers. Two thumbscrews secure the unit to the mounting plate, while a stove bolt and wing nut secure the guard to the spacers. By varying the spacers used, you can adjust the gap beneath the guard from V* inch up to 2 inches.

Basic information on working acrylic is found in the chapter "Custom Baseplates." There aren't enough parts to merit a Cutting List, so here's a list of what you need:

• One 4-inch by 4Winch piece of Winch clear acrylic

• One 4-inch by 3-inch piece of Winch acrylic

• Two Winch by Winch by 4-inch hardwood blocks

• Three Winch by Winch by 4-inch hardwood blocks

• One scrap of Winch dowel

• Two thumbscrews with nuts

clear acryuc pustic guard

THUMBSCREW WITH HEX-NUT "5HOULDER" SECURES GUARD TO ROUTER MOUNTING PLATE.

CLEAR ACRYLIC PLASTIC BASE

Acrylic Router Base Plate

to "DIA. DOWEL

PJU OF SPACER HERE.

SPACERS

Vl"THICK SPACERS

■A'xVFLATHEAO STOVE BOLT

ACCOMMODATES WORKPIECES BOTH THICK AND THIN

This guard has a set of spacers that allow you to raise the guard to accommodate an esjjecially thick workpiece. But when working an especially thin piece, you can lower the guard to keep it close to the work's surface.

■A'xVFLATHEAO STOVE BOLT

ACCOMMODATES WORKPIECES BOTH THICK AND THIN

clear acryuc pustic guard locations of the two '/^inch-diameter alignment pin holes and the Winch-diameter mounting hole. Drill the holes. The mounting hole in one of the '/2-inch blocks must be bored out to accommodate the T-nut.

to "DIA. DOWEL

1. Without stripping off the paper masking, lay out the larger piece of acrylic—the guard—as shown in Adjustable Bit Guard. Cut the curved edge with a saber saw or on the band saw. then bore the three holes. For a finished appearance, sand and polish the edges of the guard.

2. With a Winch straight bit in a table-mounted router, cut the two mounting slots in the smaller piece of acrylic. Guide the workpiece along the router table fence. For a finished appearance, sand and polish the edges of the base.

3. Stack the hardwood blocks, and clamp or tape them together. Using the guard as a pattern, lay out the

THUMBSCREW WITH HEX-NUT "5HOULDER" SECURES GUARD TO ROUTER MOUNTING PLATE.

PJU OF SPACER HERE.

This guard has a set of spacers that allow you to raise the guard to accommodate an esjjecially thick workpiece. But when working an especially thin piece, you can lower the guard to keep it close to the work's surface.

4. Using a thin block as a pattern, transfer the hole locations to the acrylic base. Drill and countersink the hole for the bolt: the side of the base with the countersink is the bottom. Drill the holes for the alignment pins. These holes can be stopped; they don't need to penetrate the base, but they do need to be in the top face.

5. Glue bits of the '/»-inch dowel in the alignment pin holes, as shown in the Alignment Pin Detail. The idea is to have holes in the bottom surfaces of the blocks and corresponding pins protruding from the tops. The exception is the block that gets the T-nut; it has pins protruding top and bottom. It's easiest to fit the pins if you use fairly long bits of dowel, then trim them to nubs after the glue dries.

6. Drive the T-nut into the hardwood block bored out for it. With the stove bolt, fasten that block to the base. Stack the other spacer blocks on the bolt, add the guard, and turn the wing nut onto the bolt, fastening the assembly together.

7. Drill and tap two holes in the mounting plate for the plastic thumbscrews. Use the drill bit and tap that arc appropriate for the size and thread of the thumbscrews you are using.

SPACERS

Vl"THICK SPACERS

CLEAR ACRYLIC PLASTIC BASE

TUE CLAMP-ON PIT ¿ÜARP NEED NEVER BE IN YOUR WAY

Clamp-On Acrylic Bit Guard

.As a variation on the adjustable bit guard, here is an adjustable guard that clamps to the router table. This arrangement offers more flexibility in positioning the guard. If you need to work on the broad part of the tabic, or from the side, you can shift the guard to accommodate the work.

The guard itself can be acrylic or polycarbonate, but it should be clear, of course, so you can sec what you're doing. The base, instead of being plastic, is a 2-foot strip of hardwood. The same hardwood spacer blocks are used to set the height of the guard, and the assembly is fastened together with a stove bolt and wing nut. By varying the spacers used, you can adjust the gap beneath the guard from V* inch up to 2 inches.

Basic information on working acrylic is found in the chapter "Custom Baseplates." There aren't enough parts to merit a Cutting List, so here's a list of what you need:

• One 4-inch by 4Winch piece of Winch clear acrylic

• One '/¿-inch by Winch by 4-inch hardwood block

• Three '/4-inch by Winch by 4-inch hardwood blocks

• One Winch by 4-inch by 24-inch hardwood strip

• One 3-inch-long Winch llathead stove bolt and hex nut

1. Without stripping off the paper masking, lay out the larger piece of acrylic—the guard—as shown in Clamp-On Bit Guard. Cut the curved edge with a saber saw or on the band saw, then bore the mounting

This guard combines height adjustability with position-ingflexibility. You can clamp the guard in whatev er position will shield the bit without interfering with your movements or those of the workpiece.

hole and the two alignment pin holes. For a finished appearance, sand and polish the edges of the guard. Remove the paper masking.

2. Stack the spacer blocks, and clamp them to one end of the base. Using the guard as a pattern, lay out the locations of the two Winch-diameter alignment pin holes and the Winch-diameter mounting hole. Drill the holes. The mounting hole in the base must be countersunk for the stove bolt on one side and counterbored for a nut on the other.

3. Glue bits of the Winch dowel in the alignment pin holes in the spacers and the base, as shown in the Alignment Pin Detail. The idea is to have holes in the bottom surfaces of the blocks and corresponding pins protruding from the tops. It easiest to do this if you use fairly long bits of dowel, then trim them to nubs after the glue dries.

4. Slip the stove bolt into the base and secure it with the nut. Stack the other spacer blocks on the bolt, add the guard, and turn the wing nut onto the bolt, fastening the assembly together.

Securing Router Into Table

This guard combines height adjustability with position-ingflexibility. You can clamp the guard in whatev er position will shield the bit without interfering with your movements or those of the workpiece.

Three-in-One Guard

More than a bit guard, this accessory is a starling pin/dust pickup/bit guard. It's designed to be placcd almost anywhere on the top of the table, independent of a fence. It has a long extension arm that allows it to be damped anywhere around the top's edge. When routing against a piloted bit without the fence, you can put this pickup where it can collect the stream of chips coming off the bit. What's more, this dust pickup has a rounded right-front edge that, like a starting pin. supports the work.

To use it. you fit the carriage bolt that extends through the pivot side into the starting pin hole in the mounting plate. Clamp the pivot side extension to the edge of the table, and plug in the hose from your shop vac.

1. Cut out the pieces for the dust pickup, and glue and screw them together, as shown in Three-in-One Guard.

2. Screw the clear acrylic top on the pickup.

3. Measure the diameter of your shop vac hose, and drill a hole that size in a scrap. Test the fit of the hose, and adjust the size of the hole as ne cessary to get an easy press fit. When you've got the size right, drill a hole that size in the back of the pickup.

4. If necessary, drill an extra hole in the router table's mounting plate for the pickup's carriage bolt.

CUTHNG LIST

Piece

Number Thickness

Width

Length

Material

Pivot side

i w

3"

24'/V'

4/4 oak

Side

i y<"

3"

3VV'

4/4 oak

Back

1 V,"

3"

m"

4/4 oak

Hardware

1 pc. W X 41/j"

X 4%" clear acrylic

6 pes. Yi" X #6 flat head wood screws

1 pc. V*" X 3'/*"

carriage bolt

Homemade Scroll Saw Stand

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