Split Fence

The fence is perhaps the trickicst pan of a router table to design. The most straightforward design, with out doubt, is a stout board, straight and flat, that is clamped to the table-top. It can be oriented any which way across the tabletop, and secured with whatever clamps are available— quick-clamps, C-clamps, even hand screws.

In some designs, the fence is secured with bolts that pass through holes or slots routed in the tabletop. Such slots gather dirt, though, and a fence like that can only move more or less parallel to the edge of the top. But with such a fence, you don't have to scour the shop for clamps every time you need to use the router table with a fence.

Our fence here combines advantages: It is strong and straight, yet its design is flexible enough that you can skew the fence at an angle across the top if need be. Best of all, it has integral clamps cinched by big, plastic wing nuts—easy on the hands.

The main fence can be used the way it is, though it's not high enough to support wide pieces on edge. To give the fence more versatility, we mounted two adjustable auxiliary fences to the main fence. The auxiliaries arc bolted to slotted wooden angle brackets, which in turn are bolted to the main fence. You can

Versatility is the hallmark of the split fence. One of many possibilities: Shift the outfeed half of the fence so it can .verv e as a stop.

Versatility is the hallmark of the split fence. One of many possibilities: Shift the outfeed half of the fence so it can .verv e as a stop.

custom-tailor stop blocks for your fence. —

custom-tailor stop blocks for your fence. —

The integral clamps are among the best features of the split fence. You can hold your rule in one hand and loosen and tighten the fcnce with the other. A long carriage bolt fitted with a large plastic wing nut secures the clamping block to the fence, while the small screw projecting from the block catches in a stopped hole in the fence to keep the clamping block from twisting.

move the auxiliary fences closer together or farther apart to adjust the width of the opening between them at the router bit. You can also move either auxiliary' fence forward toward the front edge of the table.

1. To begin, cut out a piece for the main fcnce from 6/4 stock, as specified by the Cutting List. We used oak for the fence parts, but hard maple or some other stable hardwood would work as well.

2. Cut out the various pans of the fence and shape them, as shown in Split Fcnce. Radius the edges of the fence pans with a Ms-inch round-over bit.

3. Drill the holes and counterbores for the threaded carriage bolts and T-nuts, as shown in the drawing.

CUTriNG LIST

Piece Number Thickness Width Length Material

Main fcnce

1

m"

3"

39"

6/4 oak

Auxiliary fences

2

y«H

4"

12"

4/4 oak

Angle brackets

2

IV/'

2Yi"

6/4 oak

Clamping blocks

2

MH

2 vr

W

2 pes.'/«" x 4" carriage bolts (for clamping blocks) 4 pes. lA" X 1 Vi" roundhead machine screws (for auxiliary fences) 4 pes. V" x 2Y*" carriage bolts (for angle brackets) 2 pes. Y*" #6 panhcad screws 6 pes. W l.D. flat washers 4 pes. W T-nuts

4 pes. 1 Ya" diameter plastic T-knobs, with Y*"-20 through hole. Available from Woodhavcn, 5323 West Kimberly. Davenport. IA 52806. Part #554. 2 pes. 3" diameter plastic wing nuts, with Y*"-20 through hole. Available from Woodhaven. Part #556.

The integral clamps are among the best features of the split fence. You can hold your rule in one hand and loosen and tighten the fcnce with the other. A long carriage bolt fitted with a large plastic wing nut secures the clamping block to the fence, while the small screw projecting from the block catches in a stopped hole in the fence to keep the clamping block from twisting.

At each end of the main fcnce and in each clamp block, drill a small hole for the locating pin. These pins—they're really pan head screws —prevent the clamping blocks from twisting when you tighten down the fence. The holes in the fence should provide loose fits for them. Drive a screw into the top of each clamping block.

4. Cut the adjusting slots in the angle brackets and the auxiliary fences. Assuming you've already made your router table, use a straight bit in your table-mounted router to cut these slots.

5. After applying a clear finish to the wooden fence parts, assemble the unit and clamp it to the router table.

Tass Concrete Slab

ancle bracket, a íw.2v adjusting

ROUTAV*2"

roundhead' macmine. scre.w locating pin

Mi'x ZV* carriage bolt drill and i bolt uole.

clamping block

SPLIT FEMCE

A VERSATILE FEMCE WITU BUILT-IN CLAMPS

profile of clamping block

layout as ¿ridded ; cut on band saw. cut wedge from tail

PLE5I0SAUR

__HOLD-DOWN

REACHES OVER THE FENCE

DIRECTIOM Of

Problem Solver

Holding the work on the router table, and simu Itaneously feeding it into the bit, is fraught with difficulties. Especially if the piece is outsized, it's easy for it to drift away from the fence, tip up ofTthe bit. or chatter and shake.

Three shop-made hold-downs can solve a lot of these problems. They'll keep the work tight against the table and firmly against the fence. Use them individually or in pairs. Make a couple of the fea-therboards (sometimes called fingerboards) and the springboards.

Plesiosaur is what Fred calls this hold-down. Like a dinosaur, it cranes its long neck over the fence and presses its outsized head against the work, pinning it against the router table. The brains are in the tail end; a wedge cut from the base lets you adjust the head position. With the wedge removed, the head is suspended about 2V« inches above the tahletop; with it driven completely into place, the head rests against the tabletop. What you do is adjust the wedge so the head is a tad below the top surface of the workpiece. Apply a clamp, holding both the hold-down and the wedge. Push the workpiece under the head, which will hold it tightly against the tabletop.

Featherboards are pretty commonplace and can be used throughout the shop. This one is a little different, in that it has clamping pads beside the fingers as well as behind them. It's short enough for you to clamp it to the front of any router table—as well as to the fetice.

&0dy starts as plece of oak

APPLY CLAMP MERE

DRILL MOLES INTO TAIL ANO WEDGE. ÛLUE STRING INTO HOLES, CONNECTING WEDGE TO MOLD-DOWN

The springboard is a bowlike affair with clamp pads at each end. Cut it from a strip of springy wood like oak or ash. To use it, clamp one end to cither the fetice or the tabletop— depending ujwn whether it is to hold down or in. Ficx the other end to create pressure against the work, then clamp the other end.

Fence-Mounted Dust Pickup

This pickup is a simple, open-sided wooden box covered with clear plastic. It's designed to be used with the split fence. It sits atop the main fence between the auxiliary fences. The box has a large hole in the back to accept a standard-sized shop-vac hose.

1. Cut out the pieces for the dust pickup, and glue and screw them together, as shown in I:cncc-Mounted Dust Pickup.

2. Screw the clear acrylic top onto the pickup.

3. Measure the diameter of your shop-vac hose, and drill a hole that size in a scrap. Test the fit of the hose and adjust the size of the hole as necessary to get an easy press lit. When you've got the size right, drill a hole that size in the back of the pickup.

4. Glue the mounting block to the side, as shown. Attach it to the slot in the auxiliary fence with a roundhead machine screw and a T-nut.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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