Try This

How many times have you tried to center a groove on an edge? You want the flats from cut to arrises to be equal on both sides of the cut. Ofttimcs, you simply make two passes: After the first, you turn the workpicce to reference the second face against the fence, fhis centers the cut, all right, but you usually have to accept a cut that's slightly wide.

A little savvy can help you set the fence so the groove is centered.

Set the fence as you ordinarily do. Then make a test cut in a scrap of the working stock, plowing from end to end. Turn the scrap around to make a partial second pass. If the setting is off. you'll see an offset in the cut.

The offset tells the savvy woodworker two things: one, whether to move the fence toward the bit or away from it. and two, how far to move the fence.

If the offset is in your side of the groove, move the fence toward the bit. If the offset is in the fence's side of the groove, move the fence away from the bit. Move only one end of the fence, and move it the width of the offset.

Make another set of test cuts to confirm your setup.

After plowing a groove from end to end, turn the test piece around and cut partway through; then check for offset. If the setup is perfect,you won't find any. Because the offset shown here is on the fence side of the cut (I rolled the test piece over to expose the cut), this test shows that the fence needs to he moved away from the hit slightly.

After plowing a groove from end to end, turn the test piece around and cut partway through; then check for offset. If the setup is perfect,you won't find any. Because the offset shown here is on the fence side of the cut (I rolled the test piece over to expose the cut), this test shows that the fence needs to he moved away from the hit slightly.

To set the fence for use with a piloted hit, clamp one end and swing it up to the bit, housing it enough that the pilot is "inside" the fence. Set the edge of a steel rule against the fence so it bridges the cutout, and shift the fence so the pilot just touches the rule, as shown here.

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Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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