American Woodworker A October S

To account for the splayed seat, Harkins uses the belly punch to drill the holes in the back assembly at 97 to the bit (above). Then he drills the holes in the front assembly at 83 (right). When the mortise-and-tenon work is done, Harkins joins the front and back assemblies with the side rounds, arms and runners- He begins with the side rounds, driving them home without glue as before. At this point, Harkins weaves the bottom and the back of the chair with strips of...

Play It Safe

Safety equipment such as guards, hold-downs, goggles, dust masks and hearing protection can greatly reduce your risk of injury. But even the best guard won't make up for poor judgment. Use common sense and caution in the workshop. If a procedure feels dangerous, don't try it, no matter how many other folks work lhat way. Figure out an alternative that feels safe. Your safety is your responsibility. The 1995 Woodworking in America Show A few notes to add to your...

Chisels In The

Laboratory Testing Inc., a metals-test-ing lab in Dublin, PA, performed three basic metallurgical tests on our chisels chemical analysis, hardness testing and analysis of the steel's microstructure. Chemical analysis provides a chemical portrait of the steel taken from each chisel. Chemical content affects working properties (strength and toughness) and the steel's ability to l> e hardened. Hardness testing is just that a measure of how hard the steel is. Embedded in plastic, a steel slice...

Yeung Chan

Designs and makes furniture in northern California. Step 2 Cut the lap joint. Saw the lap joint a little bit oversize and trim it to final fit with chisels. Make sure that all the adjacent joint surfaces mate perfectly before you proceed to the next step. Step 4 Cut the tenons. Lay out the tenons, measuring carefully. Saw them slightly oversize and pare them with chisels to fit the mortises. You may have to pare a bit off the mating surfaces to get everything to fit neatly together. Step 6...

Chinese Chair Joints

Chinese Joinery

A Legacy of Oriental Woodworking Ingenuity Squar Corner Joint and Hugging Shoulder Joint Mechanical marvel. This 400-year-old Chinese horseshoe chair contains nearly a dozen different ingeniously designed joints. The inset photos show the joints discussed in this article. CCXJKTESV Of THF MUSFUM OF O ASMCM CMISfSf FURMTl Rl ISSH fHOTOS BY IKIOIKK. OfOfeU. axxnsv OF THF MUSFUM OF CLASSICAL CHIKFSf fUKMTlX rhe chair stretchers connect to the bottoms of the legs with a type of mortise-and-tenon...

Workpiece

Ing it fall to the floor each time I release the pressure) I made up a stepped filler block as shown. Swivel base to drill center of stock. m* jnu v -1 guide rod. you can drill centered holes even in the ends of rails. I made my skis from a pair of 12-in.-long maple 1x2s, center-drilled on their edges for a snug fit with the steel guide rods. Slack-belt sanders are some of the most-used tools in my carving studio. I control tension in the belt by pressing with my forefinger as shown in the...

Richard Raffan

Is an author teacher and professional woodturner. He lives in New South Wales, Australia. 1 Relaxing Project in Red Oak and Hickory In a converted milk barn in Possum Bend, a small community in central Mississippi, Greg Harkins makes chairs for all kinds of people. A sign in a corner of his shop proclaims his motto Chairs for Presidents, congressmen, celebrities and other big dogs, but mostly just common folk. True to his word, Harkins has crafted chairs for the last four Presidents, yet his...

Letters

For domestic spccics with a specific gravity of 0.3 to 0.7, pressures should range from 100 psi to 250 psi. Dense tropical spccics may require up to 300 psi. Using Hoadley's data, a typical panel glue-up involving two 3 4-in.-thick maple boards with clamps every 9 in. in the middle of the 6-in. to 12-in. range recommended by Bird would require some 1,350 lbs. of clamping force from each clamp. But according to Hoadlcy, pipe clamps arc capable of only 1,120 lbs. of clamping force. My question is...

Japanese Toolbox

Build a Sturdy Case with a Slide-Lock Top Made from J 4-in. -thick white pine, the author's toolbox has built-in handles and a cleverly designed top above that slides to open and close. I first carried my masters toolbox in the spring of 1947. I remember the freshly plowed fields that stretched out on both sides of the road in the peaceful farm country where I had come to apprentice under a tategushi, or maker of sliding doors and screens. At that time the tategushi traveled from village to I