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Quick release combination riving style splitter and blade guard with anti-kickback pawls and a second European style riving knife also included.

Equipped with a sturdy, easy to adjust, T-fence design rip fence system.

Large paddle-style stop switch.

Large motor access door for quick cleaning and easier maintenance.

Totally enclosed fan cooled (TEFC), dual capacitor 1 3/4 HP motor, for smooth start-up and quiet operation, with plenty of power for tough cutting applications.

Precision-ground and polished, 40" x 27" solid granite table and extension wings; will never twist or warp and cannot rust or corrode.

Large paddle-style stop switch.

Ruggedly built saw carriage with solid cast-iron, cabinet mounted trunnions.

Quick release combination riving style splitter and blade guard with anti-kickback pawls and a second European style riving knife also included.

Equipped with a sturdy, easy to adjust, T-fence design rip fence system.

Large motor access door for quick cleaning and easier maintenance.

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48 www.AmericanWoodwoiker.cam E> E c E M B E R11A N u A R V 2010

To see a video showing how these legs work, go to; www.AmericanWoodworker, co m/145/Ad j us tab! e Le gs

48 www.AmericanWoodwoiker.cam E> E c E M B E R11A N u A R V 2010

by Alan Schaffter

"An adjustable assembly table, hub? Well, you're wasting-your time unless it's a simple design that's easy to operate."

That's what a fellow woodworker said when I described the latest scheme to improve my shop. I don't know how many times I've wished for a worktable that was shorter, or taller, than what I had,

I took my friend's advice as a challenge and went to work. He was just as pleased as I was with the result: a huge, solid table that goes up and down with ease.

These two-part legs employ a system of notches and locking arms (ratchets and pawls in engineering terminology) that allow you to change the table's height in 1" increments. The weight of the table and the geometry of the mechanism firmly force the leg sections together, so there's no wobble.

Operation of the legs is simple. To increase the table's height, just lift each end. As you lift, the ratchet arms move freely, "clicking" from notch to notch. They lock automatically once you stop lifting. To decrease the table's height, you step on a bungee cord, lift the table slightly to unlock the pawls, then lower the table. When you remove your foot from the bungee, the pawls engage the ratchet and lock the legs.

Make the ratchets

1.1 used white oak to make the legs, but any strong hardwood will do. It's OK to glue them up from thinner pieces. Mill the upper legs (A) and lower legs (B) to size (see Cutting List, page 52), These legs will make a table that adjusts from 22" to 35" high. If you'd like a different range of heights, make the legs shorter or longer (see Leg Sizing Chart, page 53).

2. Begin making the ratchets in the upper legs (Fig. B) by cutting dadoes. Make an indexing jig for your miter gauge to ensure that all the dadoes are accurately spaced (Photo 1). My jig is 3/4" x 3" x 24", but the exact size isn't important. Use a dado set to cut a 3/8" wide by 15/32" deep notch in the jig's center. Glue a 4" long alignment pin in the notch-it should fit fairly tightly,

3. Position the jig on the miter gauge so that the distance from the dado set to the indexing pin is exactly 5/8". Make some test cuts to verify this spacing, then fasten the jig to the miter gauge. Raise the dado set 1/32" to cut a notch 1/2" deep.

4. Cut 14 dadoes down the length of each upper leg (Photos 2 and 3). Cut 6 similar dadoes in a scrap piece to help set up the next operation.

5. Cut the angled sides of the ratchets. First, remove the dado set and install a crosscut or general purpose blade. Tilt the blade to the 38° mark on the saw's bevel scale. Raise the blade to make a cut 1/2" high-the same as the notches. Reposition the indexing jig so that the blade cuts to the corner of the notch (Photo 4).

Height range: 22"-35"

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Make an indexing jig for cutting ratchets in the legs. Cut a notch in the jig using a dado set. Glue an alignment peg in the notch and attach the jig to your miter gauge.
Use the jig to cut evenly-spaced notches in the upper sections of the legs. Place the bottom end of the leg against the side of the alignment peg to make the first cut.

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Reposition the leg after each cut. Place the new notch over the indexing peg and cut the next notch. Repeat the procedure to cut all the notches.

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Reposition the leg after each cut. Place the new notch over the indexing peg and cut the next notch. Repeat the procedure to cut all the notches.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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