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Big Horn Ram

Thi* Big Horn Ram n Approximately I(T squire and mounted on a simulated stone plaque. TTie curK maple used aaualh add?, to its dimensionality.

Scroll Saw Kids Puzzle Patterns

ENLARGE PATTERN 167%

No Stain

Golden Oak Golden Oak mixed

No Stain

Golden Oak Golden Oak mixed

Leopard Scrollsaw
Paint white dot on eye. Refer to photograph for placement.

PLAQUE PATTERN ENLARGE 286%

Scroll Saw Compound Cutting Patterns

General plaque background

Cut from 1/2" AC grade exterior plywood for applying 1/4" wire mesh and patching compound

Leopard

Leopard

Sroll Saw Wood Working

Black Walnut(wiped off)

Golden Oak mixed with Black Walnut

Black Walnut (heavy)

Paint white dots on eyes. Refer to photograph for placement.

Black Walnut(wiped off)

Golden Oak mixed with Black Walnut

Black Walnut (heavy)

Paint white dots on eyes. Refer to photograph for placement.

This portrait technique makes the eyes look like glass. Cut this cat quite large so that details can be cut into his eyes (see close-up photo). I lis finished size is 16" by 22".The eyes require a -Vm" blade entrv hole and all fine details are

cut with a No. 2 blade.The white part of the eye is intricate. Cut it on a rather slow speed so that it can be cut in one piece.

You don't have to cut each and every spot to have them appear dramatic. Combined spots can still look like individual spots.

Predrill a blade hole for each separate spot on the left side of the face. After you stain them heavily

with dark walnut, the drill holes will not show. Stain the pieces as you cut them, so that the stain can dry as you continue cutting. Keep them all together in a group so that w

l JL

Expert Scroll Saw Patterns Golden Retriever Scroll Saw Pattern Expert Scroll Saw Patterns

you don't mix up spots from other areas of his body This will make assembly infinitely easier. Also

predrill the spots in his forehead and eyebrows.

For the chin, cut out the spots first, stain them according to the pattern, and then cut the whiskers and the rest of the chin. Leave the whiskers unstained or brush them with golden oak stain and then wipe them oft" to keep them a lighter color.

The body is cut and stained a very dark golden oak. Give it three applications to deepen the golden color of his coat.The spots are stained golden oak with a mix of black walnut.

After the piece is assembled and glued, drop golden oak stain on the already stained body. This stain on stain looks like additional spots on the golden coat, and adds even more dimension.

Scroll Saw ProjectsScroll Saw Patrick Spielman

Copyrighted material

Introduction to Scrolling and Sculpting

This section covers a craft, called "segmentation*' by its inventor, that can be learned in a reasonably short time by anyone with a knowledge of basic scroll saw skills,The fine-line cutting capability of the scroll saw is used in combination with some elementary wood-shaping techniques to make pieces that appear to be artfully carved. These sculptural-looking works appear to require much more advanced and masterful skills than they actually do.

The essential techniques of scroll saw segmentation were introduced more than 12 years ago by Patrick Spielman, award-winning author of more than 60 woodworking books, editor of the bimonthly magazine. Home Workshop \:eu% and co-owner with his wife of the gift galleries, Spielman s Wood Works and Spielman s Kid Works,

Segmentation versus Intarsia

Segmentation is sometimes referred to as "painted intarsia." In tarsia is also called "3-D marquetry," or "3-D inlay/'The techniques involved are very similar. Both segmentation and intarsia impart a visual effect of low-relief carving, and both can be carried to various levels of sophistication (or difficulty) to create beautiful flat-backed sculptures. Cutting a design into segments, contouring each segment with hand or power tools, applying finish, then reassembling and gluing the segments together again results in a piece that emulates fine carving, but the work is much easier to accomplish.

The main difference between segmentation and intarsia is that segmentation projects, as a rule, use a single piece of inexpensive material from which all segments of the design are cut and shaped. A pigmented stain, paint, or natural finish is then applied to the segments before reassembly. There are many finishing and painting options available for segmentation projects.

For intarsia, on the other hand, each segment is cut individually from wood chosen specifically for its natural color and grain, with clear finishes applied to show off these wood characteristics as part of the design. Intarsia is more labor-intensive and somewhat more difficult to accomplish. As the parts are not all cut from a single piece of wood, every segment must be carefully shaped to fit precisely against the one it will adjoin. In addition, many species of wood may be required to supply the colors and textures to fulfill the design. You will be selecting stock from many pieces of wood in different natural colors, therefore using more expensive material. For example, walnut and maple provide dark brown and white that may be combined with various pink shades of Western cedar to create a colorful palette (see photo at right).

Segmentation Woodworking Images
Segmentation projects are sltoum with an all-natural finish fleft) ami some segments stained (right).
Western Scroll Saw Art For Sale
Hen, segmentation/wishing incofporates « variety o f options: natural, stained. and colored with acrylic paints. See pagi's IS I-152 for Rooster I1aques patterns.
Rooster For Intarsia Wood
As shown in the designs and work of noted intarsia artist Lucille Crahtnret selecting varieties of different wood specie> provides an all-natural uvod palette.

Shaping and Smoothing the Segments

In segmentation work, after preparation of the wood and cutting out the pattern (reviewed in Basics on pages 7 and 8), there are various fundamental shaping requirements for the individual segments. Most projects involve chamfered or rounded-over edges.

Some projects, however, will look more interesting if formed to tapered, concave, or convex surfaces before working the edges. Most wood-workers probably already have their own favorite devices or tools they like to use to shape wood. Choose one or a combination of the following techniques.

Thin Scroll Saw Wood

Face surface

Guide line

Thickness tapering

Tapered segment

STEP 2

TAPERING

Guide lines

Concave surface

I-V L Convex

STEP 2 surface

COMPOUND SHAPE

Chamfered edge

Rounded-over edge

Rounded-over segment elevated with glued shim

BASIC CHAMFER & BASIC ROUND-OVER

Woodworking Hand Chamfer Rasp

Finger-gauge a line ft» guide the round-aver of an edge.

Adjaoing Shapes

Ultere différent lark or thicknesses exist, shafH' the lourr segments first. Draw guide lines on adjoining segments to facilitate contouring so they appear to flow together as if cartrd from one piece.

Shaping with Hand Tools

Use sandpaper wrapped around a thin wooden tongue depressor, a dowel, or a pencil for minimal edge shaping and most smoothing jobs.

Use files, rasps, carving knives, and chisels to round-over cut edges or for giving other shapes to cut segments.

Nasal Clamp Tongue Depressor

SandpafHr wntpped around a tongue depressor makes an effective file for rounding over edges of concave curves and in tight areas.

Sandpaper around a dowel or any round object, such as a pencil, is useful for rounding over edges of concair curves.

SandpafHr wntpped around a tongue depressor makes an effective file for rounding over edges of concave curves and in tight areas.

Sandpaper around a dowel or any round object, such as a pencil, is useful for rounding over edges of concair curves.

Ihesc are the essential steps to shaping the edges o f segments.

Rubbing an edge of a segment against a 60- or 80-grit abrasive held over a padded comer o f the workbench will round-over and smooth small segments nicely:

The Parallel Link Scroll Saw

A raspf a file, or a knife may be used to carve in detail, such as the mouth for the Stri/yed Fish (see project on page 134).

Use a knife to shape MDF (medium den-sity fiberhoard) to a sharply rounded inside comer for the Unicorn Ps eye (see project on page 166).

Shaping with Rotary Tools

Rotary Scroll SawHigh Speed Rotary Tool Carving

Use high-speed rotary tools to tackle a variety of shaping and surface detailing jobs. Various accessories in different profiles and sizes are available for abrasive cutting and grinding of wood.

Use innovative methods to safely hold very small segments for edge or surface shaping with hand and/or power tools. Use pliers or temporarily adhere the segment to a holding stick (dowel) with hot glue or double-sided tape. Obviously, you cannot safely hold small segments with your fingers.

Round-oirr an edge with a small, coarse-grit sanding drum.

Carve a surface depression with a structured carbide burr.

Nose Scroll Saw NoseHand Held Scroll Saws

Xeedle-nose pliers grip a small segment while it is shaped on a supporting block with a rotary tool.

Temporarily bond the segment to a holding stick with double-sided tape or hot glue as the segment is worked against a drill press drum Hinder.

Hold a small thin segment with side-cub ting pliers while rounding the edges by hand with an abrasive.

Seyco Drill Press

An inexpensive hand drill s tat id makes a good shaping and smoothing center for using drum sanding accessories i f a drill press is not available.

Shaping with Small Routers

Use a small trim router to round over segmented edges quickly and uniformly.

Use bits from a Vh" to a W radius.

Use the pattern on the opposite page for making your own zero-clearance router base.

Zero Clearance Scroll Saw

Round over on a non-slip router pad. 11 ere, all the outside edges of this profile are rounded over In;fore the smaller integral segments an' cut free into smaller, separate, segments. Tlien the smaller segments are rounded over by hand.

Hand Scroll Saw

Right: A small ITremel rotary tool also equipped with a near zero-clearance plastù hase for use with a small round oirr hit.

Scroll Saw Trim

Look Jowly at the shop-made plastn neuter base. Son- that the hole for the hit hay almost zcro-i lea rame around it, which is essential to support the router when rounding oivr .small segments.

Right: A small ITremel rotary tool also equipped with a near zero-clearance plastù hase for use with a small round oirr hit.

Scroll Saw Projects

Round over a medium- to small-sized segment with a small trim router. Note the special shop-made, clear plastic base. l*re$sure is maintained downuwd during the mtt forcing the work piece tightly against the non-slip router pad. Perform this operation with caution. Wear suitable eye and hearing protection.

Applying Texture to Segments

Use a wood-burning tool for texturing and quickly producing v-cut lines into surfaces to simulate detail, such as hair. Produce other textured surfaces that might be more difficult to create with files or carving knives.

tu ft. A wood-burning hnd a ideal for adding definition lines to accent various surfaces of individual segments.

Sanding Disc For Wood LatheDisk Sanders For Knives

A disk sander accessory made from ply-wood for the lathe will do many of the same jobs as belt sanding machines.

To tajh'r tuv sides of a segment, use a 6" irrtical belt sanding machine.

Reducing Segment Thickness

A disk sander accessory made from ply-wood for the lathe will do many of the same jobs as belt sanding machines.

To tajh'r tuv sides of a segment, use a 6" irrtical belt sanding machine.

Sometimes it is recommended that certain segments be reduced in thickness. This task can be done in various ways, but sawing and abrasive cutting are the two easiest options.

Use the flat surfaces of belt sanders or disk sanders with coarse abrasives, 36 to 50 or 60 grit, tor quick flat, parallel, or tapered-thickness stock removal. Reduce thickness by removing material from the face, or front surface, of the segment. Removing stock from the surface that will be glued to the backer is not a good practice. If you should inadvertently remove material unevenly, or taper the surface, the edges will not fit as tightly as they should to the adjoining segments. Where thickness reduction is required, it will be indicated on the project pattern with a minus (-) sign.

Shimming Segments

Glue a shim to the back side of certain inside segments to slightly raise the segments.This technique adds to the relief. A segment representing a nose, for example, can make a face appear more realistic if raised just W above the surrounding segments. Where a shim is required, it will be indicated on the project pattern with a plus (+) sign.

Smoothing with Scroll Sanders

Use scroll sanders, available in several grit sizes, with the scroll saw to smooth segments that have already been shaped. Scroll sanders also work well to soften sharp edges or where little wood removal is required. Emery boards (fingernail files) are also useful in the shop. Use them to make your

Expert Scroll Saw Patterns
Small segments can be cut to a desired thickness with the scroll saw
Front View Template Scrollsaw
Use a scroll sander to produce small chamfered edges on ash segments.
Scroll Sander Abrasives
Make your own scroll sanders from enter)' boards (fingernail files). If necessary, cut them to length and use super glue or epax) fi> adhere them onto used or dull scroll sau blades.
The Pro Cut Scroll Saw
STEP 4

Rounded-over segment elevated with glued shim

Smoothing with Pneumatic and Soft Drum Sanders

Drill Press Drum Sander

A pneumatic (ait filledt drum satufcf rotates beturen the centers of a latin or can be driirn trrrually in a drill press (top). An ordinary bicycle tire pump pro-rides the air. .4 less exfH'itswe foam-tush-toned sander is designed specifically for contour sanding of segmented and in tarsia pieces (fwltom/.

A pneumatic (ait filledt drum satufcf rotates beturen the centers of a latin or can be driirn trrrually in a drill press (top). An ordinary bicycle tire pump pro-rides the air. .4 less exfH'itswe foam-tush-toned sander is designed specifically for contour sanding of segmented and in tarsia pieces (fwltom/.

Use pneumatic and soft drum sanders for shaping segmentation and intarsia projects/I he pneumatic drums have the advantage of being inflated to the desired pressure to match the work piece being sanded. The pneumatic type, available from Woodcraft, measures 3M in diameter x 8" in length and can be mounted in a lathe or in a drill press-The less expensive "Flex Drum" sander. manufactured by Seyco Sales Co., attaches to a 1725 rpm motor shaft or to a drill press.The foam-supported abrasive of the flex drum sander is not adjustable as far as hardness is concerned, but it is designed with a medium pliability intended specifically for in tarsia work.

Smoothing with Orbital Sanders and Flutter Wheels

Smooth the segments, using a powered device, such as a small orbital handheld sander. Use flutter abrasive wheels of 150 or 180 grit for smoothing all kinds of contour surfaces.These drill accessories allow sanding of small segments without injury to your fingers should you get them too close.

Flutter SanderPowr Kraft Table Jig Saw Motor

The foam-cushioned sander is designed to mount onto a 1/2" or motor shaft. It can also be installed in the drill press.

Using Electric Scroll Saw School

Small hand-held electric sanders work well for sanding flat and comrx surfaces.

The foam-cushioned sander is designed to mount onto a 1/2" or motor shaft. It can also be installed in the drill press.

Small hand-held electric sanders work well for sanding flat and comrx surfaces.

Flutter wheels of 150 and 180 grit will smooth most any surface contour.

Color & Finish the Segments

Colored Stains

Concentrated water-based dyes are commonly used to color wood.

Colored stains are easy-to-use fbut more expensive) products that are applied to dry, raw wood with paper towels.

Natural, light-colored woods take u\ttcr-based wood dye colors best. Hoods, left to right: oak, ash, birch, and pine.

Use water-based acrylic paint to color the individual shaped segments. Note that all of the non-visible gluing surfaces at the edges are lef t unpainted to insure a good glue bond. a

Use oil stains, natural finishes, opaque colored paints, or transparent colored dyes and colored stains. To assure a good glue bond, do not finish concealed gluing areas along the edges or the backs of segments.

Note: Always test whatever finish you choose for a project on scrap material first, to assure that it will deliver the look that you want before applying it to your project.

Transparent colors are very effective and yield interesting results as they do not conceal the woods figure, or grain. When using water-based dyes, first sponge-dampen the surfaces. Allow to dry. Sand the surfaces with the grain to remove the raised grain. Then moisten the wood and wipe out with the grain again just before the dye is applied. Create lighter shades by diluting the dye pigment with water. Watered-down acrylic paints also can be used to suggest color, yet still allow the wood grain to show through.

Ail oil-based, colored stain product is available that is much easier to apply than water-based dyes. It is a tung oil finish with pigments that imitate a dye. To use this product, simply wipe it on the dry; sanded wood with paper towels.

Use water-based acrylic paint to color the individual shaped segments. Note that all of the non-visible gluing surfaces at the edges are lef t unpainted to insure a good glue bond. a

Concentrated water-based dyes are commonly used to color wood.

Colored stains are easy-to-use fbut more expensive) products that are applied to dry, raw wood with paper towels.

Natural, light-colored woods take u\ttcr-based wood dye colors best. Hoods, left to right: oak, ash, birch, and pine.

Assemble the Segments

Place a pattern photocopy on a clean, flat surface. Cover it with waxed paper or freezer paper that is fairly transparent.You can also use plastic wrap. Glue the segments together at the edges, using the adhesive of your choice. Yellow carpenters glue and instant/super glues are recommended because they set fairly quickly.

Make a Backer

Carefully lay the assembled segments on a piece of W to l/V" plywood and trace the outline shape of the project. Cut a backer piece from the plywood. Glue the backer to the assembled segments. Attach a sawtooth picture hanger to projects that are to be hung on the wall.

Segmentation Woodworking
Reassemble the segments and glue tiurm together at the edges to make the uVuWr again.

For one-$tJed, uull-hanging projects, trace around the assembly onto a or Wi" plywood backer.

For one-$tJed, uull-hanging projects, trace around the assembly onto a or Wi" plywood backer.

Scroll Saw Wood Projects Tinkerbell
This rear view shows the plywood backer and a sawtooth picture hanger, which is typ ical of all uull-hanging segmentation pieces.
Segmentation Woodworking Images
.Stan™ are two methods of perfecting the roped edge, using tuv types of rope: sisal• hemp rope on the left with a retwisttng technique appears seamless, lite nylon rope ort the right has a simple glued butt joint that is barely visible, 7 he pencils point to rope ends.
Articles Hemp Rope
Rout a shallow round-bottomed groove around the edge of the plaque to "scat" the ropet using a router table.

(rse spring clamps or urights to hold the backer to the pre-glued segments, Xotice the tenon, shown at the pencil point, which will fit into a base, making this particular project free-standing.

Rope-edged Plaques

The rope-edging technique can be used to embellish nautical plaques, western plaques and various signs. If the rope ends are crudely butted, rope-edged plaques can look shoddy. Here are two different techniques for perfecting rope edging on plaques, using two kinds of rope. One method magically conceals the rope ends, making the rope look seamless. This technique is more involved than the other, but it is certainly worth the extra effort.

Ropes

Most hardware stores sell three types of rope: 1) sisal hemp rope; 2) white nylon rope; and 3) yellow polypropylene rope. Ropes are also either twisted or braided. Avoid polypropylene and braided ropes. Select a rope size (diameter) that complements the thickness of the wooden plaque. For example, use 5/8H rope with V-i" plaques. If mounted flush to the front surface of the plaque, W or '/2" rope also will work.

Preparing the Plaques

1. Cut boards to round or oval shapes. Round the corners on square, triangular, or other geometric shapes so the rope does not have to make a sharp bend.

2. Using a 5/hm diameter round-nose bit and a router table, rout a W deep groove into the edge of the plaque to cradle the rope. See the detail of the rope-edged section on the Mermaid pattern on page 139. This groove will accommodate V2M to 3/4 M diameter rope.

3. Clamp a concave-edged board to the fence to support the work piece over the bit, assuring a uniform depth of cut.

4. Slightly offset the groove toward the front of the plaque. Rout with the front surface facing away from the fence and keep the stock moving into the bit.

5. Clamp a piece of thin plywood to a table that has a zero-clearance hole surrounding the bit. This will help when routing edge grooves on rounded corners and connecting straight edges of square and rectangular plaques.

With the saw table tilted 159 to 20\ cut 1 /#" inside the layout line to make the backer;

As an alternative, shallow v-grooves can be fabricated around plaque edges by gluing two pieces of wood, back to back, that have previously bevel-cut edges. Upon completion of the process, an inverted v-edge will have been formed all around.

Chamfering & Finishing

1. Chamfer the edge 011 the back of the plaque next to the groove when pre-made loops of rope will be stretch-fit into the grooves. See the detail of the rope-edged section 011 the Mermaid pattern on page 139. Plaques roped with butted ends do not require chamfering.

2. Completely finish plaques before applying the rope edging. Leave surfaces of the groove unfinished where you may want to glue the rope into the groove.

Preparing the Rope

For convenience sake, the two different techniques for mounting rope to plaque edges have been named as "glue-butting" and "re-twisting." Each technique requires different preparation. Both nylon and sisal ropes can be used for the glue-butting technique, but only sisal rope works well for the re-twisting process. A thin-consistency instant glue is necessary for the glue-butting method and helpful for the re-twisting technique.

Glue-butting

Just as the name implies, the rope is glued end-to-end with instant glue.This method leaves a visible glue line, but is the quickest and easiest technique for both sisal and nylon ropes. The key is to keep the ends from fraying.

1. Using a clear, low-viscosity; instant adhesive, saturate the cutting areas. See photo, top right.

Note: The adhesive sets in a few seconds, allowing the rope to be cut on the scroll saw without fraying. Using the adhesive to plasticize the rope allows you to work it almost like wood or plastic.

2. Square one end of the rope. Measure, mark, cut, square to length, and assemble. See photos, center right,

3. Apply a gap-tilling instant glue or epoxy into the plaque groove. Place one end of the rope into the glue-filled groove. Tightly pull the other end to it, matching the twists of the rope, and glue the joint. Note: A gap-filling instant glue is ideal for this job because it sets quick. It is best to locate the butt joint at the bottom of the plaque where light shadows will help to hide the joint.

Unravelling Spiral Rope

The secret to eliminating frying and unraveling is to plasticize the rope with an instant glue before cutting it. Notice how the nylon strands lose their shape compared to those of the stsal rope when untwisted.

The secret to eliminating frying and unraveling is to plasticize the rope with an instant glue before cutting it. Notice how the nylon strands lose their shape compared to those of the stsal rope when untwisted.

Homemade Rope Saw
( lut the rope on the scroll saw: A thin board taped to the table supports the rope over the taMe opening around the blade.
Scroll Saw Expert
This piece of nylon rope has sharp, clean, and square i~utsp making it ready for gluing end to end.

Re-twisting

Homemade Rope Saw

The rope now has a glued-hutt joint. ('se a craft knife to cut auwy any glue "squeeze out " and to shape the joint.

This technique requires three times the amount of rope to edge one plaque, but it creates a wonderful-looking edge that appears to be seamless. Although this method is not difficult, it is recommended to make some practice loops first.

Use sisal rope and select one with strands that hold their shape well when separated. Nylon strands become very limp and flimsy when separated, making a neat re-twisting job impossible.

1. Measure the length of rope required to encircle your plaque. Mark clearly around all three strands of the rope at this point.

2. Cut the rope to three times this measured length.

Note: It helps to give the rope a light dose of thin instant glue at the cut ends so the strand ends still separate from each other but do not fray or unravel.

3. Now untwist the rope into three individual strands.

4. Starting at the previously marked one-third point of the total length, re-twist one strand to form a two-strand loop, It is helpful to place a drop of glue at this point, under the starting end.

5.Tightly and uniformly pull the two strands in the loop together as you continue to re-twist the strands, forming a two-strand loop.

6. Continue retwisting around the loop until you have created a three-strand loop of rope

7. Prepare the plaque with a shallow groove. Be certain to chamfer the back edge to facilitate stretching the rope onto the edge of the plaque.

8. Stretch the loop onto the plaque. If the loop is too large you can undo it and start again. If the loop is too small you can reduce the size of the plaque until it fits.

A length that is three times the circumfer-etue is required.

Endless Electrical Loop Methods
Retwist one strand to make what appears to he an endless loop of three-strand rope,
The completed loop of twisted rope has only the ends o f one of the three new strands hutting together, which can he con> cealed against the wood in the groove.
Two Strand Rope Loop
I 'sing two scravdriivrs for leverage, force a rope loop onto a plaque with the plaque face down.

The rope now has a glued-hutt joint. ('se a craft knife to cut auwy any glue "squeeze out " and to shape the joint.

Scroll Patterns Knives

Shown here is a completed hutt joint on sisal rope.

A length that is three times the circumfer-etue is required.

Shown here is a completed hutt joint on sisal rope.

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A Course In Wood Turning

A Course In Wood Turning

Ever wondered what wood turning is all about? Here are some invaluable information on how to make beautiful items out of wood! That one little strategy from A Course In Wood Turning that I implemented not only worked, but the results were completely astonishing. I had never seen anything like it! Now, keep in mind that I had tried a lot of other products up until this point. You name it, I probably tried it! That’s how desperate I was to improve my skills with wood turning.

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Responses

  • Melilot Rumble
    What is the perfect rotary tool for customize toys?
    8 years ago
  • sonny
    Can you make grooves with a scroll saw?
    6 years ago
  • dodinas
    How to joint nilon rope?
    6 years ago
  • MARISA
    What is the difference between sisal and nylon rope when making homade cat scratcher?
    6 years ago

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