Joining the seat halves

After the cove has been cut on the back section of the seat, the front section can be shaped. This shape is actually an extension of the cove on the back section.

But first the two sections of the seat (A) are edge-glued together, see Fig. 8.

template. The shape of the seat is shown in a scale drawing on page 23. But I didn't draw this shape directly on the workpiece. Instead, I first enlarged the shape and made a template from the enlargemenL

To do this, have the drawing on page 23 enlarged 320% at a copy shop, or re-draw the shape full-size onto a piece of grid paper. Then transfer the shape to a piece of scrap plywood (at least V^" thick). Finally, cut the template to rough shape and sand it smooth.

Now transfer the shape from the template to the ends of the seat, see Fig. 8.

set up table saw. Now the template can be used as a set-up gauge for cutting the shape on the front half of the seat, see Fig. 9.

The actual shaping is done with a stacked dado blade in the table saw.

First, the blade is tilted to match the angle of the curve (84V^°), see top drawing in Fig. 10. Then the fence is moved until the inside edge of the blade aligns to the desired area of cut. (Set up to start shaping where the cove shape "blends" into the flat shape.)

cut & move. Aftereach pass, usethe template to adjust the position of the rip fence and the height of the dado blade, see Fig. 9.

move fence and lower blade for subsequent cuts should not .

USE TOUCH TEMPLATE

template to set up saw for shaping seat (see fig. 10)

move fence and lower blade for subsequent cuts t=>

smoothing the seat

When the top side of the blank is shaped, the seat should now look a bit more inviting to sit on. But there's still a sharp corner at the front. Before cutting off this corner, rip the seat to finished width, see Fig. 11.

Then knock off the square corner with a bevel cut on the table saw, see Fig. 1 la.

plane & sand. The bench is beginning to look more sculpted. But there's still a series of ripples running the length of the blank where the dado cuts didn't quite align.

To smooth out the seat, I used a hand plane, just like the Shakers would have, see Fig. 12. (I used a low-angle block plane.) Plane the entire length of the seat, starting at the cove and working toward the front.

Shop Note: For the most consistent shape while planing, use the pencil marks on the ends of the seat as a visual guide. And the best way to tell when to quit planing is to use your hand — feel the surface of the seat to check for dips and ridges.

When all the bumps are gone, sand the surface of the seat smooth, see Fig. 13.

cutting off the ends

After the top of the seat is smooth, the ends of the bench can be shaped next And like most Shaker designs, the simpler the better.

tempi ate. When it came time to lay out the shape on the ends of the seat, I had a certain look in mind. Then I noticed that the template I used for the top of the seat was just about right, see Fig. 14.

At first I thought I would cut the ends to match the shape of the template. But I didn't like the look of a big "bump" sticking out at the back of the seat. So I modified the shape of the template to "flatten" the area at the back, see Fig. 14a.

kerf & sabre saw. After drawing the shape of the modified template on the ends of the seat, the ends can be cut to shape. Note: This also cuts the blank to length.

The easiest way to shape the ends of the seat is to use the sabre saw. But to keep the blade from bending when cutting such thick stock, first I made a series of short relief cuts at right angles to the pencil line, see Fig. 15.

Then, these short cuts can be connected with a smooth cut that follows the line.

sand smooth. The blade of the sabre saw will leave some "ripples" on the ends of the seat To remove these and smooth the curves, I used a hand drill with a sanding drum, see Fig. 16. Shop Note: A drill guide (such as a Portalign) helps to keep the ends square to the faces.

rout cove. There's one more decorative detail involved in shaping the seat. It's simply a small cove that's routed all around the lower edge, see Fig. 17.

CUT OFF BACK "HUMP'

SECOND CUT TRIMS OFF CORNER

FIRST CUT RIPS

TO FINISHED

CUSTOM SANDING MOCK FOR SANDING COVE (SEE PAGE 14)

USE FLAT SANDING BLOCK FOR FRONT OF SEAT

SECOND CUT TRIMS OFF CORNER

FIRST CUT RIPS

TO FINISHED

USE HAND PLANE FOR SHAPING SMOOTH

USE PENCIL UNE ON ENDS AS DEPTH REFERENCE

a. SEAT TEMPLATE (MODIFIED)

FIRST:

MARK DISTANCE FROM CENTERUNE

NOTE:

LAY OUT AND CUT FROM BOTTOM OF SEAT

NOTE:

LAY OUT AND CUT FROM BOTTOM OF SEAT

SECOND:

DRAW

OUTLINE OF MODIFIED TEMPLATE ON EACH END

a. SEAT TEMPLATE (MODIFIED)

CUT OFF BACK "HUMP'

FIRST:

MARK DISTANCE FROM CENTERUNE

SANDING DRUM

SAND

SMOOTH AND TO PENCIL UNE USING SANDING DRUM IN ELECTRIC DRILL

SANDING DRUM

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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