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The top of this workbench isn't a single slab like on a typical bench. It's really two pieces — one fixed and one movable. So the top opens and closes like a vise. ^ top. Three layers of material make the top of this bench strong. I sandwiched a core panel of plywood between two pieces of Masonite. I began as if the top were one piece, then cut it in two after adding edging strips.

First, cut the core (G) to finished size, see Fig. 8. Then cut both VV'-thick skins (H) of Masonite a little oversize. (Note: I used tempered Masonite for more durability. Standard Masonite is not as strong. It tends to flake apart with use.)

After gluing up the layers, trim the edges with a flush trim bit in the router, see Fig. 8a.

edging. Next, add edging (I) along the ends, see Fig. 8. Then, after cutting the ends flush, add edging (J) to the front and back.

vise faces. After the edging is attached, the top is cut into two pieces, see Fig. 9. Then two vise faces (K) are added to the inside edges. These are really just two more strips of edging. But I made them a little different First, I wanted to be able to replace the faces if they got banged up. So they're screwed in instead of glued, see Fig. 9a. But before screwing them in, cut a v-groove on each vise face so they can grip round objects, see photo on page 6.

Finally, to complete the top sections, I drilled a series of holes for bench dogs, see Fig. 10. This increases the clamping capacity of the vise from 7" to 17". (To make the dogs, refer to page 15.)

a. NOTE: see page 15 for making bench dogs

NOTE:

chamfer dog holes and top edges (except vise faces)

EDGING

NOTE: cut edging from stock, 1 w wide

EDGING

EDGING

NOTE: cut edging from stock, 1 w wide

FIRST:

cut top in two

FIRST: driu. counter-bore and shank hole

SECOND: cut v-groove and screw in place

SECOND:

ado vise faces

FIRST:

cut top in two

SECOND:

ado vise faces vise mechanism

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