Ociety

Ceremonial Chair

Maltwood Museum, Victoria,

British Columbia John Livingston,

Project Coordinator John Livingston: front Tlingit -style carving ArtThompson:

back carving Calvin Hunt:

"Eagle" armrests Don Yeoman: sides and lower front facia Norman Tait: "Eagle" figure surround Ann Smith: "Raven's Tail" woven cushion Cheryl Samual: Chilkat woven backrest panel Western red cedar

Kim Kelzer

Demonstrations Ever)' Furniture

Society conference has a rich array of educational opportunities. You're sure to learn new methods of work or pick up clever building tips from the pros. "Free-Form Steam Bending" drew an overflow crowd (photo, page 36). This demonstration was led by Michael Fortune, one of Canada's premier furniture builders. Michael was the winner of this year's Furniture Society Award of Distinction for his outstanding body of work and inspiring leadership. You can view some of Michael's superb bentwood furniture at www.michaelfortune.com.

Many other demonstrations offered a first-hand look at how a master craftsman thinks and works. John Levine led a workshop on Japanese and Chinese joinery. Kim Kelzer discussed the use of color in finishing. John Livingston and John Marston, First Nations carvers, spoke about Northwest masks, figures, and panels. Richard Oedel covered bent tapered lamination techniques. And there was more - something for everybody.

Bentwood box maker John Martson demonstrates traditional First Nation tools and techniques. The theme of this year's conference was "Cultural Mosaic: Reflections from the Coastal Rain Forest."

Gallery Exhibits The conference included several gallery exhibits that were a feast for the eyes. On display were dozens of pieces of custom furniture, ranging from the formal to the fantastic.

Each gallery represented a different group of artists. The "Cultural Mosaic" exhibit included work from First Nations, Asian, and European cultures. Its centerpiece was a stunning First Nations Ceremonial Chair, a collaborative effort of five artisans (see photo, page 37). Balancing this exuberant work was a serene linenfold carved-oak armchair, made in 17th century England.

Furniture Society members entered work that ranged from the functional to the futuristic in the "Members' Show." Mark Koons shared his Simple Chair #1, but there's really nothing simple

Bent on Maple Julian Laffin Camosun College Class of 2005

Western maple, handmade hardware

Blanket Chest Philip R. Smith

Shawnigan Lake, British Columbia

Padauk, bird's-eye maple, curly maple, cherry and juniper lining, ebony details

Blanket Chest Philip R. Smith

Shawnigan Lake, British Columbia

Padauk, bird's-eye maple, curly maple, cherry and juniper lining, ebony details

Sharpening Station Plans

Grandfather Clock

Cam Russell

Victoria, British Columbia

Fir, cedar, yew, aspen, copper

Grandfather Clock

Cam Russell

Victoria, British Columbia

Fir, cedar, yew, aspen, copper

A Broken Masterpiece

Mike Wolos

Vancouver, British Columbia

Bird's-eye maple, burl maple, yellow cedar, ebony inlay

Online Slideshow

To view more great work from Furniture 2007 visit: www.americanwoodworker.com/FS2007.

about its fluid design (see photo, lower left, page 37). Clearly, this chair required some sophisticated joinery and confident handwork. Mike Wolos exhibited his Broken Masterpiece coffee table (photo at right), complete with a solid bird's-eye top, two hidden compartments, and a high gloss, hand-polished polyu re thane finish.

The "Cascadia Exhibition" highlighted some extraordinary talent from British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. Hikmet Sakman's Bubinga and Maple Creclenza is a beautiful blend of Arts and Crafts and Oriental design (see photo top left, page 37). Vancouver furniture maker Cam Russell built an impressive Grandfather Clock inspired by the work of Arts and Crafts designers Greene and Greene (see photo, bottom right, page 39). While most Greene and Greene furniture was made from imported mahogany, Cam tapped local woods such as fir, cedar, yew and aspen.

Camosun College, located in Victoria, presented student works from the college's Fine Furniture Program's 2007 graduating class. This exhibit's theme was "Look What We Made For Dinner," which inspired sixteen young furniture makers to get creative designing dining chairs that were as different as scrambled eggs and steak. One of those chairs, Sushi Anyone'? by Felicity Jones, has a clear Asian influence and is an excellent example of the thoughtful craftsmanship that Camosun students put into their work.

The "Camosun College 20-Year Retrospective" exhibit was an eclectic collection from Camosun alumni. Examples include Julian Laffin's Bent on Maple recliner (see photo, bottom of page 38) and Murray Tomkins' And Climbed Up Beside Her (see photo, center, page 39), which included a ceramic back panel depicting the fabled eensy weensy spider and its web.

After Hours Beyond demonstrations, panel discussions and gallery shows, the Furniture Society conference offered numerous opportunities for woodworkers to informally exchange ideas. Chance meetings included lunch, dinner, dances and auctions of woodworking tools and products. Proceeds from the auctions benefit the Furniture Society and its educational scholarship program.

Next year's conference will be held June 18-21, 2008, at Purchase College, which is located 30 miles north of New York City, in Westchester County. For more information about the Furniture Society or to register for Furniture 2008, go to www.fumituresociety.org.

rencuy Junes Camosun College Class of 2007

Western maple, rosewwood dye and walnut stain

A Broken Masterpiece

Mike Wolos

Vancouver, British Columbia

Bird's-eye maple, burl maple, yellow cedar, ebony inlay

Hardware Blanket Chest

3 Blanket Chest - joinery detail, Philip R. Smith, Shawnigan Lake, B.C. b Coffee Table - leg detail, Michael Moore, Duncan, B.C. C Console - handle detail, Hikmet C. Sakman, Victoria, B.C.

d Belvedere Hall Table - inlay detail, Philip R. Smith, Camosun College, Class of 7999. G Whiskey Cabinet - door and leg detail, Joe Gelinas, Camosun College, Class of 1995.

Free Fish Scroll Saw Patterns

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How To Sell Furniture

How To Sell Furniture

Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

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