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BLADE can be a lot of work. My fingers have often com- V..

very loudly, * .. so I've tried many ways to hold the blade comfortably. I've used a magnet, made a holder from a chunk of wood with a shallow dado in it, and worn gardener's gloves-the kind that have rubber bumps all over them. Each method worked OK, but I finally decided that the sharpening world needs another jig.

This one really does the trick. It allows you to put a lot of pressure right on top of the blade, without tipping It, and that extra pressure makes lapping go much faster.The blade is fastened directly to the jig; the knob is elevated on a stack of nylon washers to give you a roomier grip (see Source, beiowJ.The knob is threaded and fastened to the jig with a 5/16" flat head machine bolt.

Source: Woodcraft Supply, www.woodcraft.com, (800) 225-1153, Five-Star Knob, 5/16"-18, #142224, $1.39; T-Style Knob, 5/16"-18,#142226, $1.19.

Vacuum Lapping Dust the best way to keep your sandpaper clean when lapping is to vacuum it. Sandpaper is much less efficient when it clogs up with swarf (a machinist's term for metal debris). Removing the swarf every few strokes makes a tedious chore go faster.Cleaning the sandpaper with a stiff brush or an eraser works so-so, but a vacuum removes everything, almost instantly, with no mess.

OCTOIEft/HOVEMBER joo9 www.ÄjmeiicanWoodworker.coiti 65

To post photos of wooden books you've made and see other examples, go to www-Am e r i ca n Wood wo rke r.co m/Lu m beiti b rary

By Jock Holmen

Round over one side of a squared-up blank, to duplicate the look of a book's spine.

Rip the blank to separate the spine from the body of the book.

Glue the spine back to the body. Use rubber bands as damps to avoid marring the book.

ociOBERiNOVEM beb 2 0 0 9 www.ÄrnerlcanWoodworkar.com 67

Jock Holmen is a carver from Burnsville, Minnesota.

Simulate a book's pages by sawing three sides of the blank. Vary the height and width of the cuts.

Chamfer the edges of the spine and body with a block plane.

Round over one side of a squared-up blank, to duplicate the look of a book's spine.

Rip the blank to separate the spine from the body of the book.

IF YOU CANT STAND THROWING AWAY good wood,you've probably got a stack of short boards that are just waiting to become-who knows what? I've turned my stack into a library of wood samples, which can be shelved just like real books.

My wooden books are ideal for showing customers and friends what different kinds of wood look like, and how a wood's figure varies depending on how boards are cut. Having made the books years ago, I also now have a record of how a wood's natural color changes with time and exposure.

To make a book, start by milling a blank foursquare. If you're using rough lumber, start with a blank that's at least 12" long, for safety when jointing and planing.The blank can be any thickness, but I've found that books 1" thick or more look best. For your first book, a milled 2x6 is just right.

Begin by rounding over one long side of the blank [Photo 1). For books that are 3/4" to 1-1/4" thick, use a 1/4" radius bit; for books 1 -1/2" to 2" thick, use a 11T bit; for thicker books, use a 1" bit.

Rip the spine from the body of the book (Photo 2). Make the cut 1/16" below the base of the roundover. Mark the two pieces so you can correctly reassemble them later.

Saw the book's outer pages (Photo 3). An ATB [Alternate Top Bevel) style blade gives the best look. I recommend that you use a zero-clearance fence for maximum support. Raise the blade to make a cut 3/16" deep and position the fence 1/8" from the blade.To minimize tearout, make the first cut with the book upright, leading with the spine side. Next, make a second cut on the long side. Then stand the book upright again, and make a third cut on the remaining short side. Turn the book around, and repeat these three cuts.

To cut the inner pages, raise or lower the blade a bit, move the fence 1/64" less than the blade's kerf, and repeat these cuts in the same order. Continue to make a series of similar

Simulate a book's pages by sawing three sides of the blank. Vary the height and width of the cuts.

Chamfer the edges of the spine and body with a block plane.

Glue the spine back to the body. Use rubber bands as damps to avoid marring the book.

ociOBERiNOVEM beb 2 0 0 9 www.ÄrnerlcanWoodworkar.com 67

cuts, changing the blade's height and the fence's position by different amounts each time, until all the pages are formed.

Make a reveal between the spine and body by chamfering the mating edges of both parts [Photo 4). Spread glue on the joint (use a small amount so there's no squeeze-out to clean up) and bind the book with rubber bands (Photo 5), Apply a finish-or not-and it's ready for the shelf.

Jock Holmen is a carver from Burnsville, Minnesota.

Build an updated American classic from bargain-priced plywood and poplar.

By Jeff Corns my wife and i enjoy antique country furniture, It's usually a bargain, but we've been unable to find a piece that would hold all of our computer gear. I'm a professional cabinetmaker, so naturally my wife said, "Honey, can't you make one?"

Back In the day, practical-minded country cabinetmakers often used a variety of plain woods in one piece of furniture to save time and money.They'd paint or stain their work to give the different woods a uniform look. I adopted the same strategy with this cabinet-the sides and top are birch plywood, while the face frame, doors and moldings are made from yellow poplar, Red paint ties everything together.

1 designed this case like a TV cabinet-wlth pocket doors that slide into the case, out of the way. The keyboard and mouse sit on a generously-sized shelf that slides in and out; the printer sits on a shelf above the monitor.The lower half has a large open space for the computer's tower, plus drawers to hold documents, cords and all the other stuff we seem to accumulate.

For a big piece, this armoire is pretty inexpensive.The pocket door hardware is pricey, though. If you want to cut costs,you could use standard hinges instead,and make shelves to hold your gear. With pocket doors,you have to build a free-standing unit that slides into the cabinet (Photo 10).

Join the face frame with pocket screws. They're plenty strong for this job, which is simply to hold the face frame together before gluing it to the cabinet.

This cabinet is basically a big plywood box with a face frame on Its front. Groove the face frame's stiles to fit the sides.This joint makes It easier to glue on the face frame later on.

Join the face frame with pocket screws. They're plenty strong for this job, which is simply to hold the face frame together before gluing it to the cabinet.

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