Stop dlock

To nuike j combination stop biock and hold-down, cut a Shallow rabbet in j scmp of 2x4 (see drawing). So the block presses down firmly on the stock, the rabbet^ depth should be just a hair less than the thickness ot the haro'board you'll use for the bin sid«r>.

rhen. for an even better grip, glue a strip of medium grade (100 grit) sandpaper into the rabbet.

RIOCK -

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SIDES

Once all the plywood pkxes were ait to size. I stacked them up and moved on to the sides (E. F). The sides are cut from blanks of '/»"-thick hardhoard (F'uj. /).

blanks. Firel. cut enough blanks to size. (Youll need one blank for each bin.) Then ihe blanks are cut into two pieces lo form the tapered sides.

'Hie tricky pcirt is cutting each side lo exacdy die same size while keepingyour fingers away from the siw' blade.

stop block. To solve this problem, I made a combination slop block aud hold-dowr. (see the Shop Tip at right). Hie stop block/hold-down is clamped lo an auxiliary fence dial's screwed to the miter gauge (Fig. 2).

cut the sides. To cut the tapered sides, first set the miter gauge to make a 10" cut. (The angk* isn't critical. Just try lo get it close.)

Then position ihe stop lo cut the cor-rcct width {'{" for the Large bins, T for the small bins) al Ihe short eud ol die side piece (Figv. 2 and:2a). An easy way to do this is to make a cut thixwgh tlie auxiliary fence firsL You can then measure from the kerf in the fence to the shoulder of the rabbel in Ihe slop block.

Now you can ait one side piece off die blank, ihen rotate Ihe blank and cut the mating side piece (Fig. Jb).

To help me orient each bkutk properly lor the second cut, I marked an "X" in the opposite cx>rne»' (Fig. >),

BIN FRONTS

Trie only other pieces i leeded for the bins arc the fronts (CJ. 11). (1 used pine, but any '/«"-thick stnek win do.)

cut strips. The fronts are oil from snips that are 2" wide for the small bins or 3" wide for the large bins <Fig. $).

determine length. After the strips are ripped lo width, cut the fronts lo lin-ish<*l length. To determine the length of the fronts, measure the width of a bin bottom Cf'A'"). 'Ihcn add the combined thicknesses of both side pieces (Vi*). (Itt my case, the Iron Is arelong.)

cut to length. To cut all the fronls lo lite same length. 1 clamped an 1 ^shaped stop block ro the table saw rip fence (Fig. J). This provides clearance so the cutoff won't bind between the rip fence and the saw blade.

rabbeting. Alter the fronts are cut to length, they're rabbeted to accept the sides and the bin bottom (Fig.:{). To do this, altach an auxiliary fence lo the table saw rip lencc. Then set a dado blade to cut a rabbet'/'/ deep ami wide enough to match the thickness ol Ihe sides Qh") (Fig. Ha).

Note: To support the workpieces while cutting the rabbets. 1 use a large posh block (Fig. $).

Next, reposition the fence and cut another rabbet wide enough lo Jit over the bollom (Fig. 5b).

Chamfering. I cut small cliamfers on die four outside edges of the bin fronts to soften all the sharp edges. I also chamfered Ihe top inside edge (Fig. X). t card holder. Finally, I muted a slor-across the front ol the bin to hold a cardboard Label (see the Shop Tip below).

SLnMi0 TiUP Label 5lote i ho slan tod sides of <j Joi cu i with a dovetail bit will hold a label. The \vidth isn't uitiul.

Jusl c.u: your laheh to fit.

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Assembly Jig

/ssembling a large number of bins '.can he tedious work. It's easier and faster ii you have a jig lo hold the front, bottom, and back of the bin in place while you glue and nail on one of the sides (see photo).

To make the jig. start by culling a scrap piece of '//-Thick plywood to size (Fig. 1). Then, cut a %"■ deep groove lo hold the bin's bottom. Next, cut two deep dadoes lo posiliou ihe backs of a

ASSEMBLY

Now that you've got dozens of parts stacked up in the shop, you're ready to assemble; them to make the bins.

Assembly is really very easy — the pieces are just glued and nailed together. The only thing you might want lo do is to make a couple of spacer blocks to help center the dividers in the large bins (Fig. C).

Note: If you're assembling quite a few bins. the assembly jig shown above is a real timc-savcr.

RAILS

The bins are mounted to rails made from lengths of 2x6 stock, ripped 1W wide. 'Ihe length of Ihe rails is determined by the number of bins you want. (The rails shown ir. ihe pholo on page 37 are 48« long.)

To form the retaining lip for ihe bins. :t a rabbet in the bottom hack edge of . ach rail (Fig. 7a). After ihe rabbets are cut, screw the rails to the wall, spacing r.em 4W apart. It's important thai ihe -¿Is are parallel, so here again, a spacer lock is handy f Fig. 7). a large and small bin (Fig. 1). Finally, cut a '-¿"-deep dado to hold the bin's front. (The extra depth accounts ior the lip on die outside edge of the bin front.)

To use the jig. insert a front, back, and bottom.Then glue and nail on one of ihe sides so it's flush with lite bollom of the bin (Fig. -J).

To complete the bin. simply remove :l from the jig. Ilip it over and glue and nail on the remaining side.

CROSS SECTION

ii *

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NOTE: D.MDLRS . A«CeT<lt</i . s\

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BIN FRONT

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SPACER EJ.COC-

IFVH BOTTOM RAt AM} 5CKLW IO WALL

MATERIALS LIST

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Wood Working 101

Wood Working 101

Have you ever wanted to begin woodworking at home? Woodworking can be a fun, yet dangerous experience if not performed properly. In The Art of Woodworking Beginners Guide, we will show you how to choose everything from saws to hand tools and how to use them properly to avoid ending up in the ER.

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