Tape Dispenser

Tedswoodworking Plans

16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

Get Instant Access

Start by cutting a plywood back piety-CD. two hardboard side pieces (L). and the solid wood front ((¡) to size (Fig. i). (There is no bottom in the bin.)

When rabbeting: the Iront piccc, yon only need rabbets for the sides.

Now cut a slot in each side for a dowel that holds the tape in place (Fig. I). Then glue and nail die bin together.

TAPE DISPENSER

J Ci-fH-mrr R.irfc V? ply - JV? X K Ccriler Blcxk % >'h ■ ¿V.i

HARDWARE SUPPLIES

</) NO. b X >y Rh «NOOCiSOewi (8) Mi'-tonrjNo. "3 bracts {11 V," rf.î rir//,rl. ri-V \zoq (11 Hi* ksmvWiiri"

The dowel's length is the same as the outside width of the dispenser CW).

Cut a tenon on each end of the dowel that fits in the angled slots. To do tlùs. clamp au auxiliary fence and a support jig to the table saw rip fence (Fig. 2).

Next, cut a center block (K) from a square piece of stock (Fig. 3). Chamfer the comers until it fits tight inside a roll of tape, then drill a hole for the dowel. | Finally, sc rew a short hacksaw blade to the front of the dispenser < Fig. i).

STANDARD HClLOl tAHL

Woodworking Power Tools

NOTE:

SAML Ai LARGE RIM FSOWrWlTh vo ËQTTCM RAS2ET On CARD SLOT

CUT /'HOLLO ILOl

STANDARD HClLOl tAHL

NOTE:

SAML Ai LARGE RIM FSOWrWlTh vo ËQTTCM RAS2ET On CARD SLOT

CUT /'HOLLO ILOl

Full Partial Wrap Hinge

OAMPAUXIIIARY I LNCL AND SUPPORT, 1IGTO RIP FFNCf support jlo

'POSITION OOW.L SUPPORT IK". OVfR

aux ffnffi

IIIILKNLiiCf haroroard dowel push oown INTO Saw 8LAt A/ID rotate

I ILL CIIAMILRS ON CORNERS LWT1L BLOCK

CLNtLR

srrcrw drill V,' dia.

hoi c reft cowel

I BIN CARRIER/TOOL BIN

This carrier provides a convenient -•vay to hold up to eight bins at once. An extra-long to<>1 bin fits on one sirle (see drawing at right).

■ The carrier consists of three main parts: a centcr divider (L). a basse (M). and the rails (N) (Fig. i).

■ The first step is to make the divider I.) front '/a" plywood. 'I"hc length of the divider determines the number of bins you can carry. I made mine long enough to hold up to four bins on each side (If/«") (Fid. !>).

■ After determining the length, cut die divider to shape (Fig. ?>).

- Next, drill %Mia. holes in each corner f the handle and cut out the handle opening (Fig. .■>). Kase the sharp edges •rilh a light sanding.

After the divider is complete, you can rr.akc the base (M). This is a piece of '/>" plywood cut to the same length as the divider (15W) (Fig. i). Then rip -he base to a finished width of 47/s*-* After the base is cut to size, cut a Vs" deep groove down the center to hold the divider a) (Fig. i). A Before assembling the carrier, a rail is cut to fit on each side. These

— i'.s are identical to the rails for the "•"all Mounted Bins, except that their length matches die length of the divider.

Rout a rabbet on the inside edge of each rail to hold the bins (refer to Fig. 7a on page 41). Then glue them in place on the divider (Fig. ,i).

Now. assemble the carrier, and glue and nail or. a couple of end caps «>) made from '/«" hardboard f Fig. i).

Another option is to make a long bin to hold hand tools. This bin is built to fir on one side of the carrier. (It can also hang on the wall strips.)

Hie tool biu is made just like a large storage bin. except it has a longer back (T). front (Q). and bottom (R) (Fig. 0). Two large bin sides (K) arc also used.

MATERIALS LIST

BIN CARRIER & TOOL BIN

L Dividerp) fcply-8x l&ft M &>*<!) ply-4% XI

O fnri Oj* (J) Va MM 1 Vj * P Tool Bin B.ick (1) Y,x15V, avk Q Tool Bil 1*1001 (1> Y*x 15%- 3 R too! En Btm. (I) ply - 15V..* Note: Also need two parts E.

HARDWARE SUPPLIES

KIN CARRIER

aeoend

Caps with aUF AND

Screws

Dimensions Pallet

GU.t A\0 1CRIW " BASE TO DMHFR

D.V1DER

TOOL BIN

BOTTOM to- PUWOOD

NOTE;

AKFM3IY S I ML SAML AS lAftC.r BIN

BOTTOM to- PUWOOD

NOTE;

AKFM3IY S I ML SAML AS lAftC.r BIN

aeoend

Caps with aUF AND

Screws

KIN CARRIER

D.V1DER

TOOL BIN

GU.t A\0 1CRIW " BASE TO DMHFR

Best Woodworking Shops

CONTAINING DUST

Dust Collo<tor. if you how room, a dust coliecior is ane of The most effects ways to contain dust in a snull shop.

Shop Vacuum. Another solution is to dedicate an inexpensive shop '/devum to each sawdust-producing machine.

very now and then, i receive a disheartening letter from an avid woodworker who liad to hang up his or her tools because of a respiratory problem caused by sawdust.

Dealing with dust in the shop is one of the toughest problems facing a woodworker. And when the workshop is small, the problem is compounded, hi just seconds, a power tool can kick up dust in the shop just like the snow tliat swirls around inside a glass paperweight. -Ho protecting yourself and your tools is a constant problem that must be dealt with effectively and consistently.

tv/o problems. One thing that makes dealing with sawdust in workshops located in a small home such a challenge is that you're actually faced with two different problems.

First, you'll need to find a way to handle the mess that the tools create. From the large chips your jointer or planer produces to the dust a table saw or radial arm saw kicks up. And don't forget the fme dust generated by a power sander, which ultimately ends up coating ever y tiling in your shop.

Second, you'll need to develop a strategy for keeping harmful dust out of your lungs. Fortunately, there are a number of siuipk- (and some surprisingly economical) ways to take care of both of these problems.

CONTAINING DUST

It's no surprise that the most common solution to containing dust is to use a small dust collection system. You can pick from a wide variety of quality single or two-stage collectors, like the one shown at right. With a little advance thought, it's often possible to pick a cen-tral location in the shop that can service the majority of your tools.

Tlie disadvantage to these systems is that they take up a lot of valuable space. And they range in price from 8300 to $800 or more (not including the hook-ups and pipe).

shop vacuum. A more economical option is to purchase several small shop vacuums (approximately $50 to $100) and dedicate each one to a single machine (see far right photo). To make this setup even more convenient, you am purchase an automated switch from many

Dust Collo<tor. if you how room, a dust coliecior is ane of The most effects ways to contain dust in a snull shop.

Shop Vacuum. Another solution is to dedicate an inexpensive shop '/devum to each sawdust-producing machine.

is at a premium in war small shop, you might consider a simple filter unit that can be suspended overhead where it's out of the way.

mail-order woodworking catalogs (see sources on page 112). This switch turns on the vacuum for you automatically whenever you power up the tool.

hook-ups. Besides handling your stationary tools, there's another advantage to a shop vacuum or dust collector. You may be able to hook them up to one of the largest dust producers in the shop — power sanders.

Many sandersoffera vacuum hook-up (see photo at right). Or a dust bag (see top photo on opposite page). If your model doesn't have either, see if they're available separately. If nut. you -in upgrade to a sander with built-in vacuum assist (see photo at right). These sanders pull dusl up through holes the sandpaper. They're effective and highly portable.

FILTERING DUST

Hven the best dusl collection system won't filter out all the dusi. And it's this fine dust that will coal both your shop ¿.■¡d the inside of your lungs.

fan and filter. One of the simplest and mosl economical ways to capture air-rne dust is to pull it into a fan with a 1 "rv.:ed furnace filler strapped over the intake (see photo bek>w). Just position the ¡an near the source of the dust.

Note: To further increase the efficiency of your dusl filtering, try using . • 'j separate fans — one to blow the .. into the other.

filter unit. Another option is to ; urchase (or build) a filter unit lo clean j..- air whenever you're working in the shop. Here again, one of ihe simplest r.r'Jtods is to use an inexpensive fan a pleated filter.

:or. One way ro reduce airborne two fens for This host} idea! solu-haves limited budget.

Power Sanders. A built-in vacuum (left) or on attachment (right) are tv/o vwys to contra! binding oust

The more sophisticated filler ur.ils can be moved around the shop where the dust is being produced. Or you can hang them from the ceiling over a particularly bothersome dusl source (see pholo below).

Note: You don't have to buy an expensive fdler unit lo contain shop dust. 'l"he article starring on page 38 explains how 10 build your own Shop Air Filter. It features three pleated furnace filters. Each filter traps more and more dust until clear, air is exhausted back into the shop.

dust masks. Whether or not you decide to live with a layer of sawdust in your shop, you can slill protect your lungs by always using a good quality dust mask (see photo at bottom right and sources on page 112). When buyingone of these, it's a good idea to pay a little more for a system thai has replaceable canisters that can filter both Sawdust and chemical fumes (around $50>.T"hese normally offer better protection than an average disposable mask.

dust helmet. A dusl mask will keep the dusl oul of your lungs but notour, of your eyes. For complete protection from dust, you may want to consider a dust hehncL

Recent advances in technology have allowed many manufacturers to produce lightweight sell-contained units that arc surprisingly comfortable (see photo at right). Although they cost considerably more than a dust mask (around $3(10), they do an excellent job of keeping airborne dust out of your face and lungs.

Safety Note: Although it's tempting, don't avoid the dust problem. Invest in your lungs now. YouH brealhe easier, and your shop will be clcaner. too.

Dust Mask. An economical ¿r.o convcn-j'enr vvay lo keep dust out ofyour lungs is to iwa dustmask vAtb reptecea Me fitters, i his style (ends to produced lighter seal than disposable masks.

is at a premium in war small shop, you might consider a simple filter unit that can be suspended overhead where it's out of the way.

Power Sanders. A built-in vacuum (left) or on attachment (right) are tv/o vwys to contra! binding oust

Dust Helmet If you're really concerned about tiiol tine sawdust and the health problems it can cause, don't be afraid to protect yourself. A good way to keep dust out of your lungs and face is to use a seff<cntaineddust helmet.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
A Course In Wood Turning

A Course In Wood Turning

Ever wondered what wood turning is all about? Here are some invaluable information on how to make beautiful items out of wood! That one little strategy from A Course In Wood Turning that I implemented not only worked, but the results were completely astonishing. I had never seen anything like it! Now, keep in mind that I had tried a lot of other products up until this point. You name it, I probably tried it! That’s how desperate I was to improve my skills with wood turning.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment