Whether ripping at the table saw or sanding airborne dust is a nuisance for all woodworkers Heres an inexpensive solution that clears the air in your shop

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Ted's Woodworking Plans

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You know, it doesn't take too much sawing or sanding to kick up a lot of dust. And a shop full ofairburrie dust is not a good place to work.

air filter. lhcrc is a way to get rid ol airborne dust before it reaches your lungs. Professional shops often lutve a separate filter unit tluit will remove potentially harmful shop dust from the air. Unfortunately, these units are pretty expensive. So I designed a heavy duty Shop Air Filter that uses three lurnaee filters to clean the air. lhere are two pre filters at the intake end of (he unit and one at the exhaust end.

By the time the air passes through the last filter, there's not much dusr left to trap. Ihc results are dusty furnace filters and cleaner air.

To make the unit even mtire efficient. 1 used pleated furnace filters instead of the standard fiberglass mesh furnace fil ters. These filters are commonly available and only cost a couple dollars more.

Note: There are acmally two types of pleated filters to choose from. The most common are standard pleated furnace filters. They're inexpensive, disposable, and they trap large dust particles effectively (see the photo above).

Better yer are high efficiency pleated furnace filters with an electrostatic charge.'Ihis filter is designed to capture the small particles that other filters miss.

Changing the filters is easy loo. To get at them, the buttom of the case isn't permanently attached. I used tongue ar.d groove joinery, so it slides open in either direction, and the filters simply drop down (see inset photo).

blower. To circulate the air through the shop. I used a squirrel cage blower with an enclosed motor. 'Ihis blower is easily the most expensive part ol this project. But it's a workhorse that's worth every penny, ltll cireiilate the ;iir in a 250 sij. ft. shop in about b minutes.

Note: You could possibly find a used blower from your local heating and air conditioning contractor that could be used as an inexpensive alternative.

case. The filters and the blower are! housed in a simple, open-ended case.

For the wood. 1 used just three board feet of hardwood and a little over half a sheet oF/i" plywood.

EXPLODED VIEW

9 OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 25V»W X 31"VÍD X 14,.S$H

HXEO PANEL

svs* Ptr.i VA' SCKLWS

MOJNIING PIATT

MOJNIING PIATT

svs* Ptr.i VA' SCKLWS

(g" SLIDING KANLL

(g" SLIDING KANLL

MATERIALS LIST

WOOD

HARDWARE SUPPLIES

A fixed Panel (1)

(1) SquiirtH i jut- blower

B yidrç I'aneKtt

Tb pty - 2*l"/i4 X 31V*

0 12" x24" * t 'pfeMted lunatelillm

C ides(2)

7ÍPV-13'/ÍX31V¿

(62) Mi. 3 * 1 •/,' fh woodscrews

D icp/Btm, U«rts(?2)yix Vi-2-i

(12) N0.3X IV fhwoodsaews

E i dec. teats (12)

Tlx Vi- 10)"2

(10) to.8x2V¿* Fhwoodscrews

F Mounting fíate {J)

fcpv- 12x21

Í» No. l0x'>V Fh screws

ft) No 10 flat washers

(2) 3T6" pulls w/ xwvs

CUTTING DIAGRAM

CUTTING DIAGRAM

CASE

To build the Shop Air Filler. I started with the: case. '!he case is made up of four pieces: a fixed pauel (A), a sliding panel (B). and two sides (C) (Fig. I). The size of the case really depends on ihe size of the furnace filters you use. 1 used 12"x 24" pleated furnace fillers.

Bui I found thai my furnace fillers weren't exactly 12" x 24".They're a little smaller. So before cutting ihe case parts lo size, measure ihe filters you intend to use. Then make the ease opening Vts" larger in widlh and height. This way the filters will fit well.

Also, lo help the sliding panel open ar.d close easily, it's vn?" narrower than the fixed panel (Fig. 1).

LOCKING RABBET. To hold the filter ease together, I used a locking rabbel joint (Fig. 2a). A locking rabbet provides an air-tiglu seal between the sides and ihe fixed panel. It also has another advantage — allowing (lie sliding panel lo open and close wilhoul any special hardware.

ASSEMBLY- When both the tongues and the grooves have been cut in the case pieces, the filler case can be glued up (Fig. X). 'Hie easiest way to do tliis is lo build il upside down. (You can set the sliding p-iael aside for now.)

FURNACE FILTERS & BLOWER

To position the furnace filters and blower inside, I added simple frame deals (D. 10 (Fig. /,). These cleats are W-squnre strips of hardwood thai iire screwed to Ihe inside of the case to form a n ame.

The cleats musl end up flush with the grooves in the sides (Fig. in). This ensures a tight seal between the cleats and ihe sliding panel. This is especially important since the sliding panel isn't glued in place.

Note: Most of the deals are screwed lo the case wilh iVV wxxiscrews (Fig. .ij. Hut the last cleats are screwed into the end s.T«iiu of ihe side cleats, so here I used W woodscrews for extra sireuglh.

filter frames. The air filter requires live sets of frame cleats to hold the fillers (Fig. -i). Three sels sandwich the two intake filters, and two sandwich the exhaust filter.

To allow for the filters, space the frame cleats 11 apart (Fig. 3). Experiment with the spacing here. If the filters are too tight, they're hard to change because they lend lo catch on Ihe ctaac*.

mxld panil mxld panil

Wax Power Ftir

FOR AT1CHTSFAI. CLLAI MUST 31 H.US1-•AYTH CViOOVfS IN siocs

naveon-SCREW

NOTt:

MC4JNT 8LOWES TO MOOTING MjML THEN attach F1ATF JC FRAME CLLA"

CUTOPFNI»T, IN s MOOTING FLATE TO WATCH EXHAUST FORT

S2C m0c*ftir<G -vml to Fr wo casr

4MO* Vj' panhlad SCREW

PANEL SHOULD 11DF FA5ILY IN GROOVES

ISEi Or.MLi)

end view

3AKO A'JD WAX TCftGUL

note:

XI NOT CCNTra rat« :'R?C"LY OVER D'JST-PROJIKING TOO IS

note:

.'.JRJ LOW Cf HL11K 5-«UI3RF HIRFCTFrS AWAY FROM

nusT-Pscc<;cwcTco.s

MOUNTING THE BLOWER. There's one last set of deals thai form a frame near Ihe center of thceaserri<7..i,i.This frame supports the blower. Bui 1 couldn't scrcw the blower direcriy to the frame. Instead, I made a mounting pLate GO ou: ol plywood (Fig. 5).

To make the mounting plate, first cut a pkxo ol plywcxid to fit inside the case. Then cut an opening in the plate to match the exhaust port or. the blower (Fig. 5).

Screw the blower lo the mounting plate first (t'ig. tf).'lhen screw the plate-to the center cleats.

FITTING THE PANEL ihe last Step is to install the sliding panel (Fig. 7). This panel already has tongues that fit the grooves in the case sides. If the fit is tight, sand the tongues until they slide snwxtihly f Fig. 7a). A little wax will help.

Finally, I attached pulls near the ends of the sliding panel (Fig. 7). They give you sometliiug to grab onto when sliding the panel open to change the filters.

LOCATING THE UNIT

Hiis filler unit should be located so all die dust is drawn into the intake filters (Fig. 8). You don't want it centered directly over a dusr-producing machine like a table saw or sanding table. The reason is simple. You don't want lo blow dusty air aruund. just clean air.

CEILING-MOUNTED, 'lb suspend it from the ceiling, all you will need to do is screw it to the ceiling joists.

But he careful. This filter unit isn't light. So before you attempt to mount it. locate and d rill the mounting holes first. Then be sure to get plenty of help when lilting the filter into position.

And i f your ceiling is low (as in a basement). consider mounting it on a wall, as shown in the photo below. ■

For fnp rr.rAT versatility, the air filter can bp mounted io ihe ceiling c< to o wall (os shown inthp photo above), Either wzr/ifs highly effidont

For fnp rr.rAT versatility, the air filter can bp mounted io ihe ceiling c< to o wall (os shown inthp photo above), Either wzr/ifs highly effidont

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