Corner Cupboard Stepbystep

PHOTO B: Gang-cut the carcase top and bottom panels to size, then gang-cut the fixed shelves. Use an edge guide clamped to the work-piece and your workbench to ensure straight cuts.

PHOTO A: Bevel-rip the glued-up panels on both edges to make the cabinet sides. The 45° bevels should be parallel. Clamp feathertoards to the saw table and fence to hold the panels securely as you cut

Assemble the carcase

© Edge-glue panels to use for the cabinet sides, top and bottom. Wo used 1x6 pine. Make sure to joint all edges first. The panels should be at least 1 in. longer and wider than the finished sizes of the parts. After the glue has dried, smooth t he faces of the panels with a hand plane or cabinet, scraper and a random-orbit sander.

0 Bevel-rip one edge of each carcase side panel at 45°. Then make a parallel bevel cut on the opposite edge to rip the panel to width (Seo Photo A). Cross-cut the sides to length.

©Lay out the carcase top, bottom and fixod shelves according to the drawings on page 223. Since the top and bottom of the carcase are the same size, as are the fixed shelves, stack the glued-up panels on top of one another for similar-sized carcase parts, and draw the layout lines on the Lop panel. Then screw the panels together in the waste areas (away from where the saw blade will run), line a circular saw and a straightedge cutting guide to gang-cut the angled edges in the work pieces (See Photo B). TIP: You can make an edge guide for your saw by screwing a scrap of edge-jointed 1 x 4 to a strip of V4-in.-thick hard-board, then running the saw along the J.y. to trim the hardboard, creating a blade reference edge. Align and clamp tho cutting guide to one of the ganged stacks and cut both carcase parts at the same time. Then gang-cut the other parts.

© Mark the locations for the carcase top and bottom and fixed shelves on the cabinet sides. The carcase top and bottom are flush with the ends of the carcase sides. The fixed shelves are spaced 1 lt'2 in. and 23 in. from the top face of the carcase bottom. Make reference marks for #20 biscuits on the shelves, top and bottom and sides, and use four biscuits per joint (See Photo C). Cut biscuit slots in the mating parts of each joint.

0 Rip-cut and cross-cut the two shelf edge strips to size. Use a piloted 5-S2-Ln.-radius Roman ogee bit to cut profiles in the shelf edge strips. We used a router table to cut the profiles, but a hand-held

PHOTO A: Bevel-rip the glued-up panels on both edges to make the cabinet sides. The 45° bevels should be parallel. Clamp feathertoards to the saw table and fence to hold the panels securely as you cut

PHOTO B: Gang-cut the carcase top and bottom panels to size, then gang-cut the fixed shelves. Use an edge guide clamped to the work-piece and your workbench to ensure straight cuts.

router would also work (See Photo D).

©Glue the shelf edging to the; front edges of the fixed shelves so the profiled edge is flush with the top of each shelf. Use masking tape t.o hold the edging in place while tho glue dries. The edging is oversize, and should overhang tho shelves on both ends. Let the glue dry and remove the tape.

PHOTO C: Lay out all the carcase parts and draw alignment marks lor biscuit Joints. Be sure to keep the orientation of the side panel bevels In mind when you lay out and mark the parts.

PHOTO D: Rout an ogee profile along one edge of both shelf edge strips with a piloted %2-ln.-radlus Roman ogee bit (See Inset). The edging is oversize at this stage to keep your fingers clear of the bit.

PHOTO C: Lay out all the carcase parts and draw alignment marks lor biscuit Joints. Be sure to keep the orientation of the side panel bevels In mind when you lay out and mark the parts.

©Trim the overhanging shelf edging to continue the lines of" the angled sides of the shelves, using a back saw or fine-toothed Japanese-style pull saw. Clamp the shelves to your workbench tor easier cutting (See Phot« E). Work carefully to avoid splintering the edges of the edging as you make the cuts.

O Rip the carcase back to width from 1 x 10 stock, and bevel both long edges at 45" on the table saw. The bevels should face in opposite directions from one another. Then cross-cut the back panel to length.

©Finish-sand the carcase parts and assemble the carcase with biscuits io place, to check the fit of all the parts. YouH attach the sides to the top, bottom and fixed shelves first, then attach the back to the sides. Drill countersunk pilot, holes first, then fasten the carcase parts together using IVi-in. fiat-head wood screws. Screw the carcase sides to the shelves, then drill angled pilot holes through the back and into the sides, slide the back into place, and attach it with screws (See Photo F).

Attach the face frame

©Rip- and cross-cut the face frame stiles to size. Bevel one edge of each st ile to 45° on the table saw,

©Rip- and cross-cut the face frame rails to size,

PHOTO D: Rout an ogee profile along one edge of both shelf edge strips with a piloted %2-ln.-radlus Roman ogee bit (See Inset). The edging is oversize at this stage to keep your fingers clear of the bit.

PHOTO E: Clamp the fixed shelves to your workbench and trim the profiled shelf edging to match the angled ends of the shelves. We used a fine-toothed Japanese-style pull saw to make the cuts.

according to the Cutting List, page 222. Enlarge the grid pattern on page 223 to full size on paper for the rail profile, then glue it to a piece of scrap plywood. Cut the plywood to shape, creating a half template for the rail profile. Trace the outlines of the template onto a rail, then flip the template over and finish the outline by tracing the mirror imago on the rest of the rail. Outline the second rail. Cut. out the rail profiles with a jig saw, band saw or scroll saw and

PHOTO F: Assemble the carcase parts using lVfe-ln. flathead wood screws to reinforce the faints. Attach the cupboard bach by driving the screws at an angle through the back and into the sides.

smooth the cut edges (See Phot« G). Tip: A drum sander in the drill press or a spindle sander is a great way to smooth up all the curved sa wn edges.

Arrange the face frame parts together. The ends of the rails should butt against the flat edges of the stiles; position the beveled edges of the stiles so they taper toward the back of the cupboard. Cut biscuit slots for #20 biscuits to join the ends of the face frame rails to the stiles, one biscuit per joint. Then glue up and clamp the face frame on a flat surface. Note: You may need to fashion notched clamping pads for the clamp jaws so they'll fit over the beveled edges of the stiles, to keep the clamp jaws from marring the stile bevels.

Align the face frame with the front of the car-case ho the top edge, of the face-frame top rail is even with the top of the carcase and the stiles overhang the carcase sides evenly. Attach the face frame with wood glue and 4d finish nails. Set the miils below the surface of the Face frame with a nail set (See Photo ii). Fill the nail holes with wood putty and finish-sand the face frame smooth with 180-grit sandpaper.

Attach the crown assembly

(J) Cut the crown strip to rough size (about 36 in, long), then miter the ends at 45° to continue the angled lines of the face frame. Use a table saw or a

PHOTO G: Make a template of the face-frame rail profile and use it to lay <iirt the curves on the rails. Cut the profiles using a jig saw, bard saw or scroll saw.

power miter saw to cut the miters in the work-piece. Finish-sand the front edge of the crown, then attach it to the carcase top and face frame with glue and 4d finish nails. The crown should overhang the face-frame top rail by 1 in.

©Cut a strip of molding to fit the gap between the crown strip and the face frame. We routed a Roman ogee profile into a strip of stock, then ripped the molding to width on t he table saw (See Photo I). You could use milled cove molding instead. Miter-cut the molding to length, making sure the ends will follow the lines of the crown and the edges of the face frame. Attach with glue and 3d finish nails.

Finishing touches

We painted the cabinet front before attaching the French cleats used to hang it. Because pine is a softwood, we primed the surfaces first, then applied two coats of satin paint. (We chose periwinkle blue because it's similar in tone to the blue milk paint often used to finish Colonial-style furnishings).

(P Cut the French cleats to size from scrap pine, and bevel one edge of each cleat to 4fjc. Glue and screw one cleat to each side of the cabinet along its top edge, so the beveled edges of the cleats face

down and in toward the cabinet. Use three 1-in. flathead wood screws per cleat (See Photo J).

PHOTO H: Attach the face frame to the cupboard carcase with giue and 4d finish nails. Drive the nallheads below the face frame surface with a nailset.

PHOTO H: Attach the face frame to the cupboard carcase with giue and 4d finish nails. Drive the nallheads below the face frame surface with a nailset.

down and in toward the cabinet. Use three 1-in. flathead wood screws per cleat (See Photo J).

{J} To hang the cupboard, attach the two remaining French cleats to the two walls bevel-side up so the bevels face the walls. Level the cleats to one another on the walls and space them 7 in. from the corner. Drive 2^-in. flathead wood screws through the cleats and into the wall, making sure to hit wall studs. Since the cleats will support the full weight of the cupboard and its contents, use wall anchors and appropriate screws if you cannot attach the cleats to wall studs.

©Hang the cupboard on the wall so the French cleats interlock. The cleat bevels will force the cabinet tight against the wall. Tack the cabinet to the wall with one screw through each side and cleat.

Blade guard removed for clarity

Cleat bevel faces down and in toward carcase sides

PHOTO I: Rip the cove molding for the cupboard crown to width on the table saw. Use a featherboard and pushstick.

PHOTO J: Attach French cleats to the sides of the cabinet, flush with the top of the carcase. The cleat bevels face down and into the sides.

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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