Jewelry Box Stepbystep

Tedswoodworking Plans

Ted's Woodworking Plans

Get Instant Access

Make and assemble the box

The box and lid sides and ends are res awn and cut from one piece of maple to give a four-corner grain match (two sides have continuous grain and two are butt- or end-matched). A prominent grain pattern will show off the lour-way match better than an all-over pattern like bird's-eye, hut a bit of figure or curl to the wood will add a richness that is welcome in just about any woodworking project.

O Cut the lid panel to size, according to the dimensions given in the Cutting List, page 206.

0 Install a vertical-style panel raising router hit in the router table. Fasten a tall auxiliary fence to the muter table. If you have an adjustable-speed router, set the speed to about 13,000 rpm. Using a featherboard to secure the lid panel, rout the shape, removing about Mi in. of material with each pass until you reach the desired profile. The finished panel should have a H x Va-in. lip around the edge that will fit into the groove in the- lid (See Photo A). Note: Using a panel raising bit in a router table is an easy arui safe way to cut a raised panel. The tall auxiliary fence provides a secure bearing surface for the panel, and the featherboard keeps the. panel tight against the fence as it passes the cutter.

© Plane the % stock for the box sides and ends to 1V4 in, thick. Joint one; long edge and rip the slock to &A in., then cross-cut to 21 in. in length. (This piece comprises the box sides and ends and the lid sides and ends, which will be cut; apart later after the box is assembled.)

0 Mark a center line along the ripped edge, dividing the board in two. With t he jointed edge riding on the saw table, resaw the board on a band saw (See Photo B). Use a resaw jig to guide the workpiece.

0 Plane the two resawn board halves to Vi in. thick, it is important to label the four lid and four box parts on the two boards at this point. Use the illustrations on t.he bottom of page 207 as a guide.

PHOTO A: Rout the raised-panel face of the ltd, taking off only about In, at a time. Do this by starting with the router fence nearly flush to the edge of the bit, and move the fence further Into the bit for each pass. Removing too much material In one pass could bum the lid panel or prematurely dull the router bit.

PHOTO A: Rout the raised-panel face of the ltd, taking off only about In, at a time. Do this by starting with the router fence nearly flush to the edge of the bit, and move the fence further Into the bit for each pass. Removing too much material In one pass could bum the lid panel or prematurely dull the router bit.

PHOTO B: Resaw the maple stock In half for the sides and ends of the box, using a marked centerline as a guide for the blade. A shop made resaw jig clamped to the saw table will help square the board to the table and keep the blade tracking along the cutting line.

Featherboard

Auxiliary router table fence

PHOTO C: Cut a 15s bevel into the top edges of the two resawn box boards. Use a featherboard and pushstick for accuracy and safety.

PHOTO 0: Cut the bottom rabbet into the lower edge of the box skies. Attach an auxiliary wood fence If you use a table saw and dado-blade set to cut these rabbets.

PHOTO C: Cut a 15s bevel into the top edges of the two resawn box boards. Use a featherboard and pushstick for accuracy and safety.

PHOTO E: Cut the sides to length on the table saw, mrtering the ends at the same time. Use a miter gauga set to exactly 90° to feed the stock through the blade.

©Set your table saw blade to 15° and cut a bevel on the lid edges of both resawn workpieces (See Photo 0).

©Cut a H x la-in. dado along the edge of both resawn boar ds, Va in. down from the top of the beveled edge. Then cut a V4-in.-dcep rabbet for the box bottom along the opposite long edge of each board (See Photo D). Tb do this, first fasten an auxiliary wood fence to the saw fence to keep the dado blade from damaging the metal fence.

© Install a combination table saw blade and tilt it t;o 45". Test the angle cut on some; scrap stock to be sure it is exact. Then use a miter gauge to feed the workpieces as you cut the four sides to length, with a 45" miter at each end (See Photo E).

PHOTO 0: Cut the bottom rabbet into the lower edge of the box skies. Attach an auxiliary wood fence If you use a table saw and dado-blade set to cut these rabbets.

PHOTO F: Apply glue to the mitered faces and use tape to hold the corner Joints together while the glue sets. Tack the box bottom panel into Its rabbet. The lid panel dado gets no glue.

©Cut the plywood bottom to size. Set the bottom panel into the rabbets on the box ends and sides, and the lid panel in the groove near the bevel. Check the fit of the mitered corners. Note: The lid panel is narrower than the bottom panel to allow the lid. to expand across the grain. Disassemble the box, and sand the inside faces of ¡.ill the parts, as well as the top surface of the lid panel.

©Arrange the box side and end pieces end-to-end, with their outside faces up and the groin aligned. With the mitered edges pressed tightly together, run a strip of wide masking tape or clear plastic packing tape along each of the three corner joints and burnish it-. Flip the assembly over and spread wood glue into both members of each miter joint (use no glue for the lid or bottom panels to allow

Wood Lid Joint

PHOTO G: Apply bar clamps across the box length and width to ensure tight miter joints. Wood cauls between the box and the clamp faws will help distribute clamping pressure.

PHOTO H: Rip the box and lid into two pieces on Hie table saw, with the box bottom against the saw fence, ftatse the blade to % in. and cut ore end, then cut adjacent sides, working your way around the box.

PHOTO G: Apply bar clamps across the box length and width to ensure tight miter joints. Wood cauls between the box and the clamp faws will help distribute clamping pressure.

PHOTO I: Glue the tray supports to the Inside ends of the box. Butt them against the box bottom and hold them tight with spring clamps.

for wood movement). Roll the; assembly into a box with the bottom panel and lid in place, and tape the last joint closed (See Photo F).

©Use bar clamps clamped across the width and length of the jewelry box to further close the miters (See Photo G). Allow the glue to dry, remove the clamps and tack the bottom panel into the rabbet with %-in. brads.

© Remove the tape, working carefully to avoid tearing away the wood grain at. the corners. If it's difficult to do this, soften the adhesive with a heat gun. Apply mineral spirits with a rag to remove any tape adhesive residue.

©With the box bottom against the table saw

PHOTO H: Rip the box and lid into two pieces on Hie table saw, with the box bottom against the saw fence, ftatse the blade to % in. and cut ore end, then cut adjacent sides, working your way around the box.

PHOTO J: After the tray dividers are assembled, glue up the tray sides and ends and tack the tray bottom in place with farads.

fence, rip the lid from the box, starting on an end and cutting clockwise around the box side panels (See Photo H). CautiON: Be sure to support the lid on the last cut, but be careful not to pinch the blade between the lid and the box as you make the cut, which could cause the saw to kick back.

&>Cut the two tray supports to size. Sand the inside face and top edge of each support, and glut; the supports to the inside faces of the box ends wit h the lower edges but ted against the bottom panel (See Photo 1).

Assemble the tray

Surface-plane ■M-ui. stock down to Ya in. for the tray parts. Rip- and cross-cut the tray sides, ends, dividers and bottom to size. Caution: Use care

Miter Joint Serving Tray

PHOTO I: Glue the tray supports to the Inside ends of the box. Butt them against the box bottom and hold them tight with spring clamps.

when cutting these small workpieces to size, especially if you cut them on a table saw. If you make the cuts on ci table saw, start with stock that is long enough to keep your hands a safe distance away from the blade.

©Cut Vi-in.-vvide x Vo-in.-deep dadoes in the long tray dividers and the tray sides, as shown in the Tray (Top Vieui) illustration, page 207. Then, cut Vb-in.-deep, t4-in.-wide rabbets in the ends of both tray ends. Cut in.-deep, Vi-in. wide rabbets along the bottom inside edges of the tray ends and sides to accept the tray bottom. Sand all the tray parts smooth with 150- to 180-grit, sandpaper.

Glue and clamp tbe center tray divider unit together and let the glue dry. Then glue and clamp the tray sides and ends to the assembled dividers with the divider ends set in the dado grooves (Si*; Photo J). Drill pilot holes and use VS-in. brads to fasten the tray bottom in place.

Add the hinges, feet & handle

(J) Cut a 1 x 1 x 12-in. blank of walnut for the jewelry box feet. Cross-cut one end square and mark a line around it, 3/i in. from the end. Starting at this line, bevel the four faces of the foot so they taper to % in. square at the end of the blank. Sand the foot tapers on a stationary disk sander (See Photo K), then cut off the foot. Repeat this procedure lor the remaining three feet.

©Cut a piece of walnut to Vi in. thick x % in. wide x 2 in. long for the handle and square the ends. Divide one long edge in half and draw 20" beveled lines from this point to either short end of the handle blank. Cut along these angle lines with a band saw to create a five-sided shape that matches the handle on the Front View illustration, page 207. Designate a front face to the handle and bevel the edges from the back face toward the front to give the handle a sleeker profile and mimic the leg tapers.

©Finish-sand the feet, handle, outsides of the box and tray wit h 180-grit sandpaper. Because maple is dense and closed-grained, the maple box needs to be sanded with fine paper—220-grit—to remove fine scratches; otherwise they'll show up in the finish. This finishing step is particularly important if you plan to apply a wood stain to the jewelry box.

PHOTO K: For safety and to maintain control over the workpiece, sard the tapers on a long walnut blank, then cut off a foot and repeat for the other three feet.
How Attach Hinge Box
PHOTO L: Measure and cut the hinge mortises with a wood chisel, then install the brass jewelry box hinges to attach the iid to the box.

©Mark out the hinge leaf mortises on the lid and box, and cut the mortises with a sharp wood chisel. Install the hinges, drilling pilot, holes for the screws first (See Photo I.).

©Glue and clamp the feet to the bottom of the box, t'8 in. in from the corners. Clue and clamp the handle onto the lid (See Front Section, page 207).

Finishing touches

©Apply a clear finish to show off the natural beauty of tbe maple and walnut—we used three coats of Danish oil.

Inlaid Tea Tray

Impress your guests arid cut down on the number of trips you make to the kitchen when you build this generously sized serving tray. The finger-jointed corners are attractive as well as sturdy and the decorative veneer inlay adds a. sophisticated touch.

Vital Statistics: inlaid Tea Tray

How Shallow Plywood Tray

TYPEi Serving tray OVERALL SIZE; 17W by 3H by 24L MATERIAL: Cherry, cherry plywood, veneer iniay JOINERY: Finger, biscuit, dado joints

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS:

- Tray bottom made of two sheets of 1/4-iri. cherry plywood iaminated together and surrounded by a mitered and biscuited cherry frame

■ Decorative veneer iniay on tray bottom installed into a shallow rabbet cut around the perimeter of the top piywood pane]

- Frame ends attach to sides with finger joints FINISH: Satin tung oil or polyurethane

Building time l/i PREPARING STOCK 1 hour

LAYOLtT 2-3 hours

CUTTING PARTS 4-5 hours

ASSEMBLY 2-3 hours

FINISHING 1 hour

TOTAL: 10-13 hours

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment