Mantel Clock Stepbystep

PHOTO B: Drill holes in the face frame rails and sides so you can assemble these parts with dowels. A doweling |ig ensures that the holes are positioned precisely across each joint and keeps the drill bit straight In relation to the workplece.

Dado Joint With Table Saw

PHOTO A: Cut rabbets across the ends and along one long edge of each side piece using a dado blade on the table saw. These rabbets form recesses for the carcase top and bottom, as well as the plywood back panel. Attach a sacrificial wood fence to your saw fence to protect the metal fence from the dado blade.

PHOTO A: Cut rabbets across the ends and along one long edge of each side piece using a dado blade on the table saw. These rabbets form recesses for the carcase top and bottom, as well as the plywood back panel. Attach a sacrificial wood fence to your saw fence to protect the metal fence from the dado blade.

Make the carcase

© Cut the carcase parts: Rip and crosscut the carcase sides, top and bottom to size from Vi-in. stock, according to the Cutting List dimensions, page 172.

Rout rabbets into the ends of the sides for the carcase top and bottom pieces. Cut these rabbets on the table saw using a dado blade. Set your dado hlade to Vi in. wide, and raise it to a height of 14 in. Cut a J^-in.-wide rabbet into eacli end of both side pieces.

Q Cut the back panel rabbets. First, install a sacrificial fence on your saw's rip fence to keep the dado blade from damaging the metal fence. Raise the dado blade so it cuts into the wooden sacrificial fence to a height of in. so only Vi in. of the blade protrudes out from the saw fence. Lay each side piece with the end rabbets face-down on the saw table, and cut a rabbet into one long edge of each (See Photo A)

Q Glue up the carcase: Dry-fit the carcase top and bottom pieces into their rabbets in the sides. 13e sure the top and bottom fit fully into their rabbets, or the crown and base assemblies will not fit. properly later. Sand the faces of the parts smooth now, while they're stilt accessible. Spread glue into the rabbets, and clamp up the top, bottom and sides. Adjust the clamps until the carcase is square.

O Make the back: Rip and crosscut 14-in. cherry plywood for the back panel. Then, lay out and cut the center access hole, using the Back drawing, page 173, as a guide. Cut out the ncccss hole wit.h a jig saw. Drill a t2-in.-dia. pilot hole at each corner of the cutout area first, to moke turning the jig saw easier as you cut.

Build the face frame

©Cut the stiles and r ails to size: Rip and crosscut the two face frame stiles and three rails from t-2-in. stock. Lay the face frame parts into position on the clock carcase and be sure that fhe overall face frame fits flush with the outside edges of the carcase.

PHOTO B: Drill holes in the face frame rails and sides so you can assemble these parts with dowels. A doweling |ig ensures that the holes are positioned precisely across each joint and keeps the drill bit straight In relation to the workplece.

Q Drill the face frame dowel joints: Measure and mark for dowel holes on the rails and stiles. The center rail should be centered on the length of the stiles. Then clamp each face frame part in a doweling jig and drill ^-in.-deep dowel holes, centered across the thickness of the parts (See Photo B). Use a M-in.-dia. dr ill bit for boring these holes, and mark your thill bit with masking tape to keep from accidentally drilling the holes too deeply.

PHOTO C: Square off the inside chamfered corners of the face frame with a chisel. Lay out these corners first with a pencil and square, then pare up to your layout lines.

© Glue up the face frame: Cut six l-in.-long dowels, and spread an even coating of glue unto each dowel. Insert the dowels into the fact; frame parts, and clamp the face frame to hold the dowel joints tightly closed until the glue dries.

© Rout the face frame chamfers: Install a 45° piloted chamfer bit in your router, and adjust the bit depth to Win. Set the face frame on a non-slip router pad, and rout counterclockwise around the inside edges of the face frame openings. Work carefully, keeping the router base held firmly against the face frame as you gu. Use a pencil and combination square to square off the corners where the router bit couldn't reach, and pare chamfers into the face frame corners with a sharp chisel to square them off (See Photo C). Then, cut lung chamfers along the outside edges of the face frame with the router at the same bit. setting as you used for the inside chamfers. Be careful not to chamfer the ends of the face frame; they should butt flush against the crown and base.

Assemble the crown & base

To avuid milling tiny molding and attaching it to the clock, or using wide manufactured crown molding instead, we simply routed profiles into larger blanks of cherry stuck for the crown and base, then laminated these parts together. The crown is composed of two parts -one with a roundover profile and one; with a cove and bead profile. The base is made of three pieces: two roundovers sandwiching a layer with a cove and bead profile.

PHOTO D: Rout the roundover and cove and bead profiles into the ends and along one edge of the base and crown parts. Mill the end grain first, then rout the long grain; otherwise the bit could tear out the corners of your finished edges.

(I) Make the roundover parts: Hip and crosscut the roundover top, bottom and base to size. Note that the base is made of'-ii-in. stock, while the other roundover parts are Vi in. thick. Set up a piloted Yz-ln. roundover bit in t.he router table, and rout the profiles in two passes of increasing depth, to minimize hurn marks left on the workpieces. Ruut the ends uf Uiese workpieces first, which are mure likely to chip when the hit exits the workpiece. You'll clean up these corners when you rout the long edge of each port. Once the routing is complete, sand the parts smooth.

PHOTO E: Glue up the crown and base first, then glue these completed assemblies to the clack carcase. Glue alone will bond these parts sufficiently, so no additional fasteners are needed.

PHOTO F: Cut rabbets and dadoes Into the retainer stiles for the retainer rails. Make these cuts on the table saw with a dado blade, and hold the parts against the miter gauge. We installed an auxiliary fence on the miter gauge to keep the dado blade from tearing out the grain on the retainer stiles.

PHOTO F: Cut rabbets and dadoes Into the retainer stiles for the retainer rails. Make these cuts on the table saw with a dado blade, and hold the parts against the miter gauge. We installed an auxiliary fence on the miter gauge to keep the dado blade from tearing out the grain on the retainer stiles.

PHOTO G: Install the glass and retainer frame with a pair of brass wood screws—one through the retainer top rail and one through the bottom rail. Countersink these screws.

(J) Make the cove and bead parts: Kip and crosscut the cove and bead top and bottom to size. Use the same router techniques iijr milling the profiles that you used in Step 10, routing the ends first., then the edges (See Photo D). Sand these parts smooth and to remove all hurn marks.

Glue up the crown and base: Spread glue over the mating surfaces of the crown parts and clamp them together. Be sure the back edges are flush and the cove and head pieces overhang the roundover piece evenly. Glue and clamp the base parts together similarly with the bottom cove and bead piece sandwiched between the roundover bottom and roundover base. For more clarification on the orientation of these parts, see Side Section View, page 173.

© Install the crown and base on the carcase: Spread an even layer of wood glue over the top and bottom ends of the carcase, and set the crown and base in position. Use spring clamps to hold the parts together and keep them from shifting while the glue dries (See Photo E).

Install the retainer & glass

The glass is held in place in the clock case with a stile-and-rail retainer frame and a couple of screws. This way, the glass remains removable, should it. ever need replacing.

© Cut the retainer- parts: Surface plane J/2-in. cherry stock down to % in. thick for the retainer' parts. Kip and crosscut the two glass retainer stiles and three retainer rails to size.

© Mill rabbets and dadoes into the retainer stiles for the rails. Notice in the Groove Layouts drawing, page 173, that the retainer stiles are rabbeted on the ends and dadoed across the middle to house the retainer rails. Make these cuts en the table saw with a dado blade set to a width of % in. and raised 316 in. a hove the saw table. Mark the rabbet and dado locations on each of the stiles, and cut the dadoes and rabbets carefully with the stiles held against the miter gauge (Set; Photo F). Sand the retainer parts smooth.

^ Assemble the retainer and i nstall the glass: Dry-fit the retainer rails and stiles together, then glue and clamp the parts. Be sure the retainer frame is flat as well as square. Once the glue dries, set the glass in place io the clock case, drill countersunk pilot holes through the top and bottom retainer rails, and fasten the retainer and glass in place with two #4 x in. brass wood screws (See Photo c;>.

PHOTO H: Attach the quartz ciock movement and hands to the clock face, according to the kttmaker's instructions.

PHOTO I: Fasten the brass clock face to the top portion of the retainer frame with six parihead sheet metal screws and washers. Pushpins serve as a handy way to hold the clock face in place as you adjust it, prior to installing screws and washers.

PHOTO H: Attach the quartz ciock movement and hands to the clock face, according to the kttmaker's instructions.

Assemble & mount the clockwork

© Follow the instructions that come with your clock works to install the quartz movement and hands on the brass clock face (See Photo H).

© Mount the clock face: Set the ciock face into place on the top retainer frame opening inside the clock carcase. Shift the face up and down, right and left until it is positioned evenly within the retainer frame. Hold the brass face in place temporarily with pushpins while you install it with #6 x Vz-in. panhead machine screws and washers. Drill pilot holes for these screws to keep them from splitting the retainer parts (See Photo I).

Finishing touches

© Prepare the clock for finishing: Disassemble the clockwork, and remove the retainer and glass from the clock carcase. Sand any remaining rough edges and surfaces smooth with 220-grit sandpaper.

© Apply the finish. We used wipe-on tung oil to enrich the natural wood tones and grain of the cherry. After each coat, rub down the surfaces of all the wood parts with #0000 steel wool, which "burnishes" the finish and removes any surface irregularities.

© Assemble the clock: Reinstall the glass, retainer and clock face. Fasten the back panel into its rabbets in the carcase back with four #4 x ?4-in. brass flathead wood screws (See Photo J). Drill countersunk pilot holes for the screws.

PHOTO I: Fasten the brass clock face to the top portion of the retainer frame with six parihead sheet metal screws and washers. Pushpins serve as a handy way to hold the clock face in place as you adjust it, prior to installing screws and washers.

PHOTO I: Apply your finish of choice to all of the wood clock surfaces, then Install the clock back with brass fiathead wood screws, driven through the back and into the rabbets In the carcase back.

piece of red oak, so there's no complicated joinery or exacting miter work involved f1 Though this frame project is I v A designed for standard 4 x 6-in. g \ photo prints, you can enlarge ' i , > , or reduce the template dimensions to make photo frames

Personalize that special family photo when you mount it in a photo frame you've built yourself. The frame oval is milled from a single

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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