Woods Stands Techniques

3/e" x tV2a dowels

Part No. Size Material

F„

Tray sides 4

11/16 x 3/4 x 13% in.

11

G.

Top rails 4

U X 1.1/4 X 12% 131.

rd

H.

Tray bottom i

V:2X 12Vs X 12th in.

Plywood

1.

Tile 1

1/4 x 12 x 12 in.

Tray side

Tite

TRAY

V4" chamfer

V4" chamfer

SIDE ELEVATION

SIDE ELEVATION

Plant Stand: Step-by-step

Make up the parts

© Joint, plane and rip-cut stock to 1 Vl x IVi? in. square. Cross-cut the four legs to 28 in. long.

© Chamfer the tops of the leg«. We used a routrr table with a chamfering bit, but you could also use a stationary disc sander with a table, or even a small block plane. Set up your tool to cut a Vi-in. chamfer. If using a router table, position a fence with a bit relief cutout so its face is flush with the pilot hearing of the bit. To prevent tearout of the grain 00 the trailing edge of the cuts, back up each leg with a block of scrapwood as you feed the workpiece over the bit. We used a square pushboard to feed the workpieces and to provide a surface for keeping the backup block tight against the workpiece (See Photo A). Chamfer all four edges of each leg top.

© From %-in. stock, rip-cut and cross-cut the four tray rails, the two bottom shelf rails, and the Ixrt-tom shelf to size, using the dimensions given in the Catting list on page 12G. Then cut the four top rails to size from %-in. stock (either resaw or plane thicker stock to % in. thick). All 10 r ails can be; cross-cut together at the same setting (12% in. long). A power miter saw is a good tool for these crosscuts.

Assemble the plant stand

© Lay out and drill all of the dowel holes to join the rails to the legs. There are two dowels per joint, liefer to the Illustration on page 121 for placement. A doweling jig like the one shown in Photo B will greatly simplify this work. The dowel joints for the tray rails and the bottom shelf rails are centered on the legs. They require %-in. holes ibr 1 Vi-in.-long dowels, but the dowel holes are only drilled Yi-in. deep into the logs. The '/i-in.-dia, dowel holes in the legs for the top rails are off-center. If you place a in,-thick spacer on the inside of the leg before clamping the doweling jig to the workpiece, this will shift the eenterpoints of the jig holes the correct amount off-center (See Photo B).

© Drill the %-in. dowel holes tor attaching the bottom shelf to the bottom shelf rails. Use the same doweling jig to drill the holes into the ends of the shelf (three in each end). To bore the holes in

Back-11 board

PHOTO A: Chamfer the top edges of each leg. A backup block of scrap wood prevents tear-out on the trailing edge of the cut, while a pushboard keeps It tight against the workpiece and permits a uniform, safe pass over the cutter and against the fence. Use a wood fence with a bit relief cutout.

PHOTO B: Drill dowel holes in the tegs for the top rails. Since these joints are not centered on the legs, use a %-in. thlck spacer to offset the doweling jig the proper amount.

PHOTO C: Drill dowel holes in the bottom shelf rails. We used a portable drill mounted in a portable drill guide equipped with a depth stop. Use a brad-point bit.

the shelf rails, use a portable drill with a drill guide or a drill press with a brad-point bit (See Photo C). Drill only Vi in. deep into the rails.

© Assemble two sides of the plant stand separately Glue, dowel and clamp the parts together. For each side assembly, attach one bottom shelf rail, one tray rail, and one top rail between two legs (See Photo D). Measure the diagonals from corner to corner to check for square, and adust the clamp pressure as needed until the diagonals are equal.

0 Glue the dowels into the joints and clamp up the two side assemblies and remaining rails to complete the; plant stand framework. Be sure to glut? and clamp the bottom shelf in place at the same time. This serves as a stretcher to tie the lower legs together, as well as a shelf (Sec Photo E).

©Kip-cut 34-in. strip to make the tray cleats, and cross-cut to 12%in. long. Due to the del-icateness of parts this small size, the most effective tool to use is a sharp back saw in a miter box.

© Drill countersunk screw holes for attaching the cleats to the inside faces of two opposing tray rails. Also drill two countersunk screw holes up through the bottom of each cleat for attaching the tray.

© Apply glue to the tray cleats and use a spring clamp to hold them to the inside faces of tray rails on two opposite sides of the plant stand. The bottom edges of the cleats should shew the countersunk ends of the screw holes and should he flush with the bottom edges of the tray rails. Drive #6 x lW-in. wood screws through the countersunk screw holes to attach the cleats to the tray rails (Sec Photo F).

Assemble the tray

©Cut the lii-in. plywood tray bottom to VZV* x 12V& in. We used birch plywood sanded on both sides.

® Make up four tray sides from ¥4-in.-thick stock. Rip them to 3/4 in. wide. This will limit the depth of the tray recess so the top surface of the tile will be slightly above the tray sides. Leave the strips oversize in length.

Miter-cut the ends of the tray sides so they wrap around the tray bottom with their miters fitting together tightly. This can be done on a table saw with a miter gauge or on a chop saw.

PHOTO C: Drill dowel holes in the bottom shelf rails. We used a portable drill mounted in a portable drill guide equipped with a depth stop. Use a brad-point bit.

PHOTO D: Using dowel joints, glue and clamp up the legs and cross supports on a flat surface. Waxed paper protects your worksurface from glue spi llage.

© Glue and clamp the tray sides to the tray bottom. Apply glue to the miters and to the edges of the plywood. Use scrapwood cauls to distribute the clamping pressure and to protect the wood from the clamps (See Photo G). Clue-up the tray on a flat surface, making sure the bottom of the tray bottom and the tray sides are flush.

© After the glue has dried, remove the clamps. Use a combination square to mark out % x 34-ih. notches in the mitered corners of the assembled tray to fit around the inside corners of the legs.

PHOTO E: Glue up the frame base for the plant stand. Slip wood cauls between the heads of the bar or pipe clamps and the plant stand. Position the cauls so they distribute the clamping pressure evenly across multiple joints, if possible.

PHOTO F: Attach the tray cleats to the inside faces of the tray rails, using glue and #6 x lV4-in. wood screws. The bottoms of the cleats should be flush with the bottom edges of the tray sides and should feature countersunk screw holes for attaching the tray bottom.

PHOTO E: Glue up the frame base for the plant stand. Slip wood cauls between the heads of the bar or pipe clamps and the plant stand. Position the cauls so they distribute the clamping pressure evenly across multiple joints, if possible.

PHOTO G: Glue and clamp the tray sides to the tray bottom, aligning the mltered comers. No additional reinforcement is required.

PHOTO F: Attach the tray cleats to the inside faces of the tray rails, using glue and #6 x lV4-in. wood screws. The bottoms of the cleats should be flush with the bottom edges of the tray sides and should feature countersunk screw holes for attaching the tray bottom.

PHOTO H: Cut % x %-in. notches In the outside comers of the tray to allow It to fit around the Inside corners of the legs. Use a small, fine-tooth saw like the dovetail saw shown above. Make sure to keep the tray plumb as you cut.

PHOTO G: Glue and clamp the tray sides to the tray bottom, aligning the mltered comers. No additional reinforcement is required.

© Apply the wood finish. We used Danish oil. For a fine finish, apply grain filler to the wood first—mahogany responds well to filler.

(E) After the finish is thoroughly dry, tape off the top surfaces of the tray sides to protect the wood.

PHOTO I: Seal unglazed tile and grout joints with penetrating sealer. Use a disposable foam brush to apply the sealer. Because a plant stand is likely to be exposed to a considerable amount of moisture, sealer is important to protect the plant stand top and to help inhibit mildew and other forms of discoloration that can affect the grout.

PHOTO I: Seal unglazed tile and grout joints with penetrating sealer. Use a disposable foam brush to apply the sealer. Because a plant stand is likely to be exposed to a considerable amount of moisture, sealer is important to protect the plant stand top and to help inhibit mildew and other forms of discoloration that can affect the grout.

Use a back saw or dovetai] saw to cut out the notches, cutting carefully along the waste sides of the lines (See Photo H).

Apply finishing touches

{J) Finish-sand the plant stand and the top surfaces of the tray sides. Ease all exposed sharp edges with sandpaper (but only ease the top, inner edges of the tray sides).

© Apply the wood finish. We used Danish oil. For a fine finish, apply grain filler to the wood first—mahogany responds well to filler.

(E) After the finish is thoroughly dry, tape off the top surfaces of the tray sides to protect the wood.

(3D Lay a base of tile adhesive on the tray bottom and set the tile or tiles.

(J) Seal the tile and any grout lines with penetrating sealer (See Photo i).

When the sealer is dry, remove the tape from the wood. Set the finished tray in place on the cleats, and screw it to the cleats from below with #6 x 1-in. flathead wood screws (See Photo J).

PHOTO J: Lay the plant stand on its side and attach the finished tray by driving #6 x 1-in. screws up through the countersunk screw holes In the bottoms of the tray cleats.

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