Joining solid wood to solid wood can be a problem Sliding dovetails are one answer A dovetail tongue fits in a dovetail groove so the pieces of wood can move Its a strong joint that doesnt need any glue

Wood movement. It's a big concern with many projects. As solid wood expands and contracts with seasonal changes in humidity, joints can pop and boards may warp. Since this Desk is built with a number of wide solid cherry panels, it required specialjoinery to deal with the problems of wood movement.

JOINERY. Sliding dovetails are one answer. With thisjoinery technique, the wide side panels are free to float independently of the frames that hold the panels together. But the drop-down door required another answer. To keep this panel flat I used "breadboard" ends.

EXTRAS. Ogee bracket feet complete the case and raise it off the ground. Since these can be built for other projects, we're featuring separate step-by-step instructions on how to make the feet, see page 26. The pigeonhole unit inside the desk is also treated separately, see page 24.

WOOD & FINISH. AH the visible parts of this desk are solid 3/4"-thick black cherry. Only the drawer sides—and some other parts that aren't visible — are different. For these I used V2'1-thick maple for more wear and less expense.

I went an extra step for the finish — four top coats of General Finishes' Royal Finish (satin).

EXPLODED VIEW

MATERIALS

PIGEONHOLE UNIT

SEE PAGES 24 & 25

PIGEONHOLE UNIT

SEE PAGES 24 & 25

DRAWER 4

OGEE BRACKET FOOT

SEE PAGES 26 TO 29

DRAWER 4

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 40"W x 21 "D x 42"H

OGEE BRACKET FOOT

SEE PAGES 26 TO 29

CASE

Drawer Rails Fr. (4) Drawer Rails Bk, (4) Drawer Runners (8) Dividers (2) Drawer Guides (2) Rail Lip (1) Dust Panel (1) Molding Strip (1) Door Panel (1) Door Ends (2) Door Supports (2)

3/4X21 -371/2 3/4 x 12,5/l6-40 3/,6X7/8-38'/2 3/4 X 203/4 - 391/4 3/4X2-39'/4 3/4X2-39'/4

3/4X23/4- 17V2

3/4 x 1 -38>/2 Va ply - 343/4 X 17'/2 '/2x 11/16-96 (rgh) 3/4 X 15-351/8

DoorSupp, Ends (2) 3/4x 2 - 39/i6 Case Back (1) V4 ply - 36'/a x 3W4 Ogee Foot Blanks (3) 1 '/2x 574 - 16

DRAWERS

S Drawer 1 Back(l) T Drawer 2 Back (1) U Drawer 3 Back (1)

V Drawer 4 Back (1) W Drawer 1 Front(l) X Drawer 2 Front (1)

Y Drawer3 Front(l) Z Drawer 4 Front (1) AA Drwr 1 Sides (2) BB Drwr 2 Sides (2) CC Drwr 3 Sides (2) DD Drwr 4 Sides (2) EE Drwr 1 Bott(l)

3/4 X 31/2 - 35I/4 3/4X43/8-383/8 3/4X51/4-383/8 3/4X61/8-383/8 1/2X 3'/2 -193/8 1/2X 43/8 -193/8 1/2X 5'/4 -193/s 1/2X61/8-193/8 1/4 ply - 343/4 Xl 91/4 1/4 ply -377/8x 1974 3/4 x 11/4 - 3

CUTTING DIAGRAM

3/4" x S> 1" - 96" (FOUR BOARDS 3.7 Bd. Ft. Each)

x S' j" - 96" (TWO BOARDS @ 3.7 Bd. Ft. Each)

JZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-

SUPPLIES

(2) Brass Hinges-2" x 3Vi6u (8) Lg. Brass Drawer Pulls (1) Brass Escutcheon Plate (6) Sm. Brass Drawer Knobs

JZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ-

D

1

E

N

1

E

N

t

T

1

1/4" x 3" - 84" (TWO BOARDS @ \ 8 Bd. Ft. Each) Maple

y//////>

V

DD

DD

v//////

1/4" x 3" - 84" (TWO BOARDS @ \ 8 Bd. Ft. Each) Maple

14" x S ' -2" - 84" (3.2 Bd. Ft.) Maple

14" x S ' -2" - 84" (3.2 Bd. Ft.) Maple

\ r

y//,

u J *

m

ALSO NEED: One 4x8 Sheet 1 4" Maple Plywood, plus One 4x4 Sheet W Cherry Plywood NOTE: Materials for Pigeonhole Unit on Page 24

CASE SIDES & TOP

I started work on the Slant Front Desk by building three solid panels for the outside case, see Fig. 1. But building a project with solid wood panels calls for some planning. Since each of the panels must be glued up from several boards, it's important to select these boards from stock that looks like it came from the same board. (Fortips on gluing up large panels, see the article on_page 11.)

cutTO ROUGH SIZE. After gluing enough boards together for three oversize blanks (two for the sides and oneforthe top), cut the sides (A) to finished width and rough length (39"), see Fig. 1. (The sides will be cut to finished length after the rabbeted miter joint is cut across the top.)

Then cut the top (B) to rough width (133/t") but finished length (40"), see Fig. 1.

Note: The top end of the sides and the front edge of the top should be finish-quality cuts. That is, flat, smooth, and square to their adjacent edges.

RABBETED MITER JOINT. In order to hide the end grain where the case sides meet the top, I used a variation of a miterjoint, see box at right. A common miter joint would work, but by rabbeting the miter, the joint is stronger and assembly is easier. (The pieces won't shift as much when they're glued and clamped together.)

Cut the rabbeted miterjoint on both ends ofthe top (B) and the topend ofthe sides (A) as explained in the box at right.

SIDES

After cutting the rabbeted miterj oint, the sides (A) to finished length, see Fig. 1. Note: Do this by cutting off the bottom ends square to the edges.

The sides of the case are held together by a shelf and web frames that are built later, refer to Fig. 8 on page 20. To hold the shelf and web frames in place (and also allow the solid wood sides to move), sliding dovetail joints are used.

This joint involves a dovetail tongue on the ends of the shelf (and web frames) that locks in a dovetail groove on the insides of the case sides. (Refer to the box onpage 21.)

lay OUT DOVETAIL GROOVES. The frames that fit in the dovetail grooves do more than hold the sides of the case together. The web frames also support the drawers inside the

RABBET ON BACK EDGE (SEE DETAIL b.)

37 Vi"

RABBET ON BACK EDGE (SEE DETAIL b.)

37 Vi"

25W

S

I !

-

H 3*»

i

1 i

The rabbeted miterjoint starts out the same on all the mating pieces (the top and side panels). Cut a Vg'-deepkerf across the insideface of all three pieces.

MMliiMB

FENCE

ATTACH RUB STRIP

TO WORKPIECE WITH CARPET TAPE

FENCE

ATTACH RUB STRIP

TO WORKPIECE WITH CARPET TAPE

V6"

SET BLADE TO 45' ANGLE

Cutting the miter is critical — the blade must align to the kerf. To help, stick a piece ofMasoniteto the workpiece. Then adjust the fence and sneak up on the cut.

Cutting the miter is critical — the blade must align to the kerf. To help, stick a piece ofMasoniteto the workpiece. Then adjust the fence and sneak up on the cut.

: ! 1 Y

/ >■*■ RUB / STRIP

TOP ONLY

__________________________4—1. »

1

The last cut is a rabbet on the top piece only. Again use the Masoniterub strip, but this time to help position the blade in relation to the long point ofthe miter.

The last cut is a rabbet on the top piece only. Again use the Masoniterub strip, but this time to help position the blade in relation to the long point ofthe miter.

Woodsmith

case. And since all the drawers are different heights, the dovetail grooves are different distances apart.

To lay out the position of the dovetail grooves, measure up from the bottom of the case sides, see Fig. 1. Then draw a line across the inside face of each side panel to indicate the center of the dovetail grooves.

Note: Since the sliding dovetailjoints are to be hidden on the front of the case, these grooves stop 3/8M from the front edge, see Figs. 1 and lc.

ROUT dovetail GROOVES. Now the dovetail grooves can be routed. To do this, I used a Vfc'tiovetail bit and guided the router along a straightedge clamped to the workpiece, see Fig. 2. (Refer to Shop Notes on page 15 for information on building a self-aligning router edge guide.)

Now rout the five stopped dovetail grooves on each of the sides, see Fig. 2.

ANGLED CORNERS. After the dovetail grooves have been routed, the next thing to do is cut off the front corners at a 35° angle to produce the slant front, see Fig. 3.

To do this, first lay out the angle on both of the case sides, refer to Fig. 1. Then the angle is cut in two steps. First, cut to within about Vi6M of the line. (Make this rough cut on both side panels.)

To get the same angle on both side panels, they could be clamped together and hand planed to the mark. But I did something different. After the rough cut, I clamped a straightedge along the pencil line (on the right-hand panel) and used a flush trim bit in the router to complete the cut and smooth the edge, see Fig. 3. Shop Note: To avoid chipout along the edge, rout from the lower corner to the upper corner.

To cut the second (left-hand) side panel identical to the first, I clamped the two panels together so they were flush along the top, back, and bottom edges. Then I ranthe bearing of the flush trim bit along the smooth edge of the first panel to trim a matching edge on the second panel.

RABBET. Finally, cut a rabbet along the back edge of the side panels to accept a plywood back panel, see Figs, lb and 2.

After flush trimming the angle on both side panels, set the panels aside and work can continue on the case top (B).

ATTACH LIP. Before cutting the case top to finished width, I first glued a thin top lip (C) to the underside of the front edge, see Figs, la and 4. This lip acts as a stop when the pigeonhole unit is installed inside the assembled case, refer to Fig. 5 on page 25.

rip TWO BEVELS. After attaching the top lip, rip a 35° bevel along the front edge ofthe case top, see Figs. 5 and 6. Note: The angle of this bevel must be exactly the same as the angle on the two side panels so the door will fit tight to the case when it's closed.

Cut this bevel with the top face against the table, see Fig. 5.

Next, rip an intersecting bevel along the front edge, this time with the bottom face against the table, see Fig. 6. Note: Because of the lip on the front edge, the workpiece won't lie flat on the table for this second cut. That's okay — only the angle of the first bevel is critical.

rip top TO WIDTH. Now the case top can be ripped to finished width (with the beveled edge against the fence). Note: Sneak up on the finished width until the top aligns to the sides at the front and back edges, see Fig.l.

To accept a plywood panel for the back of the case, cut a rabbet along the lower back edge of the top piece, see Fig. 7.

RIP FENCE

RIP FENCE

AUX.

FENCE

TOP I

1 7" DADO

RABBET ALONG BACK EDGE OF TOP

SHELF & FRAMES

When I finished building the case sides and top, I began work on the shelf and the web frames that hold the sides together.

SHELLF. The shelf (D) is built from glued-up stock just like the case sides and top. Then it's ripped to finished width to match the width of the sides (less the width of the rabbet for the back panel), see Fig. 8.

To determine the finished length of the shelf, measure across the underside of the top, from the shoulder to shoulder. To this dimension add the combined depth of the opposing dovetail grooves (%")• Now cut the shelf (D) to this length.

FRAMES. All four web frames are built the same way. Two side drawer runners fit between a front and a back rail with stub tenon and groovejoints, see Figs. 8 and 9.

Note: Since the back rails and drawer runners will be hidden, I used a less expensive wood (maple). But for the visible front rails, I used cherry.

Start by ripping all the frame pieces to finished width, see Fig. 8.

Next, cut the front and back drawer rails (E and F) to finished length to match the length of the shelf (D).

To determine the length of the drawer runners (G), measure from the front edge of the case side to the shoulder of the rabbet at the rear. Then subtract the width of both drawer rails. To this number add 1" (for a V2M-long tenon on the end of each runner), then subtract W (for an expansion gap where the runners meet the back rail).

grooves & TENONS. The next step is to cut a groove centered on the inside edges of all the frame pieces, see Fig. 9. Note: Cut these grooves to match the thickness of the W'-thick plywood to be used as a dust (and rodent) barrier for the lower panel.

Now cut stub tenons on both ends of all the drawer runners, see Figs. 8 and 9.

SLOT MORTISES. A pair ofvertical dividers separate the top drawer from the two sliding door supports, refer to Fig. 8 and the Exploded View. These dividers have stub tenons on the ends that fit into slot mortises, refer to Figs. 10,11,and 15.

TOP DIVIDERS. After routing the mortises, I ripped two dividers (H) to finished width to match the front rails, see Fig. 11 .To determine the length of the dividers, measure between the centers of the top two dovetail grooves and subtract W.

After cutting the dividers to length, cut the stub tenons on the ends, see Fig. 11.

DRAWER GUIDES. Next, I cut a pair of drawer guides (I) forthe top drawerto ride against, see Figs. 8 and 11.

Measure Sliding Dovetail

DOVETAIL TONGUES. Now I routed the dovetail tongues that fit the dovetail grooves in the case sides (A), see box at right.

Note: Rout dovetail tongues on theendsof all eight web frame rails, see Fig. 12. Also, rout a tongue on both ends of the shelf (D) and on the edges of the drawer runners.

NOTCHES. Before the front rails (E) and shelf (D) canbe glued in place, notches must be cut atthe ends, see Fig. 12. Also notch the front edge ofboth dividers (H), see Fig. 11.

RAIL LIP. Next cut a narrow rail lip (J) to fit between the shoulders of the front rail of the bottom web frame, see Figs. 8 and 8a. (This supports molding attached later.)

CASE ASSEMBLY

Here's where all the parts get joined to create the carcase of the desk.

Shop Note: Because the solid wood sides must be allowed to expand and contract with changes in humidity, the case is assembled with glue only in certain spots, see Fig. 14. Don't put glue on the tongue of the front rail.

(It will scrape off in the dovetail groove.) Instead, apply gl groove. Also, do not apply glue to the glue to the front end of the tongues on i

. Start assembling the case by sliding the shelf (D) in place in the upper dovetail groove. This holds the sides to-ether while the web frames are installed. here's a sequence for installing the frames. With the shelf in place, continue by sliding

SLIDING DOVETAIL JOINT

A sliding dovetail is a two-part joint. Even without glue, the angled sides of the tongue fit the angled walls of the groove exactly. It's a strong way to join two pieces of wood.

Routing both parts of the joint must be precise — a tight fit holds the project to-ether. But the joint shouldn't be too tight. ou must be able to assemble the parts.) The secret to the best fit is sneaking up on the final cut until the tongue just fits the groove. To help, I built a tall fence (page 14).

...

I

— jll" f]

1'y! i

1/5" DOVETAIL —

3,*" - - - -* ~

BIT

I _ ^

-

W

GROOVES. Dovetail grooves are routed TONGUES. Dovetail tongues are routed with a hand-held router. Set depth of cut on the router table. The height of the bit and then run router against a straightedge, matches the depth ofthe dovetail groove.

in the front drawer rail until the front edges are flush. Next slide in both drawer runners so the tongues at the front fit into the grooved edge ofthe front rail, see Fig. 14.

PLYWOOD panel. Now cut a dust panel (IQ the same length as the drawer runner to fit inside the web frame. Note: I installed a panel only in the lower web frame. But since the other frames have grooves to accept a panel, you could install a panel in these as well. (Extra panels add weight and cost.)

Finally, slide in the back rail. This should fit flush to the shoulder of the rabbet for the back panel. Note: There should be a VV'gap between the back of each runner and the front edge ofthis rail. Thislets thecase sides contract without splitting the frames.

TOP WEB FRAME. The assembly sequence for the top web frame is a little different than for the lower frames. The difference is the dividers (H). These are glued in the mortises between the shelf and front rail before the drawer runners are installed, see Fig. 15. Here, the extra-long mortises (on the underside of the shelf) permit the tenons to slide in even though the rail and shelf are in place.

Now install the remaining sections of the top web frame as you did the lower frames. Then install the top (B) between the sides.

UPPER guides & rail LIP. Complete assembly of the case by gluing the drawer guides (I) onto the upper frame runners, see Figs. 8 and 11. Also, glue on the rail lip 0), see Figs. 8 and 8a.

DON" GLUE RUNNER INTO GROOVE OR BACK RAIL

DON" GLUE RUNNER INTO GROOVE OR BACK RAIL

ONLY

GLUE DUST PANEL INTO FRONT RAIL AND DRAWER RUNNERS

ONLY

GLUE DUST PANEL INTO FRONT RAIL AND DRAWER RUNNERS

OGEE FEET & MOLDING

A Chippendale piece of furniture like this is distinguished by its short, sculptured feet (called ogee bracket feet). On page 26 we're showing how to build the ogee bracket feet.

MOLDING STRIP. After making and installing the feet, cut a blank for the molding (L) to finished width and rough length, see Fig. 16. Then rout a profile along the edge with a 3/8" round-over bit, see Fig. 16a.

Now miter the molding to fit around the front and sides of the case. Glue on the front strip, but for the side strips only apply glue to the mitered corner. Anchor the back part of the strips with screws from inside the case through slotted shank holes, see Fig. 16.

OGEE FEET & MOLDING

DOOR & DOOR SUPPORTS

The fold-down door is made up of three pieces — a glued-up panel and two "breadboard" ends, see Fig. 17.

DOOR ENDS. After the door panel (M) is trimmed to finished size, cut a pair of door ends (N) to length (to match the width of the panel).

TONGUES, GROOVES & RABBETS. Now the door ends are joined to the door panel with tongue and groovejoints, see Figs. 17and 17b. Note: To allow the wide panel to expand and contract, the ends are glued only along the middle third of the tongues, see Fig. 17.

After the door unit is built, rout a round-over (with a small shoulder) around all four edges on the outside face, see Fig. 17a.

Then, to allow the door to fit inside the door opening, rout a rabbet on the inside face of three edges, see Fig. 17b. (Don't rabbet the bottom edge.)

DOOR SUPPORTS. Now rip a pair of door supports (0) to width Vi6" less than the height of the opening to fit between the case ana dividers. Then cut the door supports to finished length, see Fig. 18.

Next, cut a pair of support ends (P) to length to match the width of the supports, see Fig. 18. Then rip the support ends to finished width, and attach them to the supports with tongue and groovejoints.

relief NOTCH. Next I routed a shallow notch along the top edge of each door support, see Fig. 19. This allows the support to slide with a minimum amount of binding.

DOWEL PIN & BRASS KNOB. Now glue a dowel pin into each door support as a stop, see Fig. 20. Then a small brass knob can be attached to the front of the support end.

INSTALL DOOR. Before starting on the drawers, I installed the door with a pair of brass hinges mounted flush to the surfaceof both the door and the shelf, see Fig. 21.

ATTACH KNOB & ESCUTCHEON PLATE CENTERED 2" FROM TOP EDGE

ATTACH KNOB & ESCUTCHEON PLATE CENTERED 2" FROM TOP EDGE

DRILL W HOLE W DEEP

DRILL W HOLE W DEEP

POOR SUPPORT END 0 ^

DOOR SUPPORT

POOR SUPPORT END 0 ^

a. ROUTER TABLE FENCE

DOOR SUPPORT ASSEMBLY

a. ROUTER TABLE FENCE

ROUT RELIEF DEEP

DOOR SUPPORT ASSEMBLY

ROUT RELIEF DEEP

DRAWERS

At this point the project becomes more like an ordinary cabinet with dovetail-joined drawers. There's only one small difference. On most chests of drawers, all the drawers are the same width. On this desk, all the drawers are the same width except the top drawer (because of the door supports).

DRAWER PARTS. I began the drawers by cutting the drawer backs (S, T, U, V) Vs" smaller in each dimension than the drawer openings, see Fig. 22. Note: I used VV'-thick maple for all the drawer backs and sides.

Next, cutthe drawer fronts (W,X, Y, Z) to the same size as each drawer back. (I used 3/4"-thick cherry for the drawer fronts.)

After that, cut eight drawer sides (AA, BB, CC, DD) to the same height as the fronts and backs. Note: Cut the sides 15/8M

shorter than the depth of the drawer openings. This allows for the stop blocks (GG), plus Vfe" for the drawer backs, see Fig. 22a. It also allows for a 3/s" overhang on tne front when the drawers are closed, see Fig. 22b.

DOVETAIL JOINTS. After cutting all the drawer parts to finished size, rout half-blind dovetails on the ends of each. (I used a dove-tailjig with a router and a W dovetail bit.)

Before assembling the drawers, rout a WL deep groove around the lower inside face of each drawer part to accept a V4" plywood bottom, see Fig. 22. (Note: Measure your plywood and cut the groove to this size — 1/4" plywood is usually less than V4" thick.)

ROUND-OVERS. Also, rout a round-over around the face of each of the drawer fronts, see Fig. 22b. This profile should match the profile around the door, see Fig. 17a.

DRAWER BOTTOMS. Now cut the drawer bottoms (EE, FT) to fit, and glue up the drawers. (Note: I used V4" maple plywood for the drawer bottoms with the grain direction

DRAWER 1

DRAWER 1 SIDE

DRAWER 1 BOTTOM (W PLYWOOD)

HW) DRAWER 1 I FRONT

43/fc"

DRAWER 2

383/s" LONG

DRAWER 1

DRAWER 1 SIDE

DRAWER 1 BOTTOM (W PLYWOOD)

HW) DRAWER 1 I FRONT

43/fc"

DRAWER 2

383/s" LONG

DRAWER 3 383/S" LONG

DRAWER 3 383/S" LONG

A Half-blind dovetails are customary on a well-built dra wer. We routed thejoints using a hand-held router and a dovetailjig.

running from front to back. You could cut the bottoms so the grain runs from left to right, but it will take extra plywood.)

GLIDES & STOPS. To keep each drawer centered in its opening, I glued thin drawer glides to the sides of the case and runners, see Fig. 23. Finally, cut and glue a pair of drawer stop blocks (GG) to the back rail for each of tne drawers, see Fig. 24.

24

SHELF

3/4" X 1 1/4" x 3"

GLUE STOPS TO

BOTH SIDES OF CASE j

( s

^" \ ^^^ DRAWER 3 \CTOP BLOCK

PIGEONHOLE INSERT

The top of a desk can get awfully cluttered. So it's helpful to have a way to organize the stuff inside. That's the reason for this pigeonhole unit, see photo.' It's a separate assembly that slides into the desk from behind.

The unit is just a large egg-crate divider made from 3/8M-thick stock. (I started with W-thick cherry and planed it to W thick.) Two compartments have vertical dividers that fit into dadoes in the horizontal pieces.

But the best part are the drawers. These are just boxes that slide into three of the openings. Note: Ifyouhave something especially valuable to hide, you can add a hidden compartment behind the middle drawer. (For more on this see Shop Notes, page 15.)

EXPLODED VIEW

NOTE:

ALL HARDWOOD IS 3/8" THICK

EXPLODED VIEW

NOTE:

ALL HARDWOOD IS 3/8" THICK

CUTTING DIAGRAM

A&B

F

WM

3/S" x 6" x 60" (TWO BOARDS @ 2.5 SQ. FT. EACH)

G

G G

G

G

G

'A

7777777777772

W x 6" x 66" (TWO BOARDS @ 2.8 SQ. FT. EACH)

ALSO NEED: 1/4" PLYWOOD LEFT OVER FROM DESK BACK

MATERIALS

CASE

A Top (1)

3/6 X IP/4

- 38^/16

B Bottom (1)

3/6 X 113/4

- 387/16

C Sides (2)

3/6 X 113/4

-1111/16

D Case Dividers (2)

113/4

-1111/16

E Middle Shelf (1)

3/6 X 113/4

-127/16

F Outside Shelves (2)

3/6 X 113/4

-125/6

G Storage Dividers (6)

3/6 X 113/4

- 95/16

DRAWERS

H Mid. Drawer Fr/Bk (2)

3/6 X 45/16

121/6

I Mid. Drawer Sides (2)

3/$ X 45/16-

111/2

J Mid. Drawer Bott. (1) 1/4 x 11H

111/4

K Out. Drawer Fr/Bk (4)

3/6 X 11V)6

-125/16

L Out. Drawer Sides (4) %x 1 15/16_i 1

M Out. Drawer Bott. (2) 1/4x11i3/16-] 11/4

PIGEONHOLE ASSEMBLY

For the best fit inside the desk, I built the pigeonhole unit from the outside in.

rip TO WIDTH. To start, first measure from the back edge of the door lip (C) to the shoulder of the rabbet at the back of the case, refer to Fig. 5. Then rip all the case parts to the same width (113/4M in my case).

cut TO LENGTH. Next, I cut the case top (A) and bottom (B) to length to fitfrom side to side in the desk opening. Note: I actually cut them W less than the openings so they could slide inside but still be fairly tight.

After the top and bottom are cut to length, the sides (C) and dividers (D) can also be cut to length. To determine their length, measure the height of the desk opening and subtract W (since they fit in dado joints). Then subtract another Vi6" forease of installation.

RABBETS & DADOES. When cutting the rabbets and dadoes, I cut opposing pieces at the same time. This way, all thejoints willbe aligned opposite each other.

SHELVES & STORAGE DIVIDERS. After the dadoes and rabbets are cut, the case can be dry assembled. Thenthe shelves (E, F)can be cut to length to fit inside the case.

Next, cut the storage dividers (G) to fit between the case top and outside shelves, see Fig. 3. Then, to make it easier to pull files from the compartments, I cut an arc on the front of each of the dividers, see Fig. 2.

ASSEMBLY. Now the case can be assembled with glue and No. 4 screws to hold the joints together, see the Exploded View.

DRAWERS. The last thing to do is build the drawers. Design Note: To add a hidden compartment behind a drawer as explained on page 15,that drawer must be built shallower.

The drawers are made using 3/8M-thick stock. (Again, I used solid cherry.)

First cutthe fronts and backs (H and K) W less than the height and width of the opening, see Fig. 4. Then rip the sides (I and L) to the same height as the front/back pieces, see Fig. 4.

NOTE: CUT ALL PIECES

123,i"

2Vfc"

CASE DIVIDER

123,i"

2Vfc"

BOTTOM

CASE DIVIDER

387/16"

NOTE: ALL DADOES ARE

3" RADIUS

3/4" RADIUS

I STORAGE

-1 DIVIDER

NOTE: STORAGE DIVIDERS ARE NOT GLUED PLACE

ASSEMBLE CASE WITH GLUE AND

#4 x 3/4" Fh WOODSCREWS

ASSEMBLE CASE WITH GLUE AND

#4 x 3/4" Fh WOODSCREWS

RABBETS. Next, cut a rabbet joint at both ends of each drawer front/back, see Fig. 4a. Now the sides can be cut to length to fit between the rabbets. Note: When the drawers are closed, the fronts fit flush with the case.

DRAWER bottoms, I used W 1 plywood for the drawer bottoms (J and M), see Fig. 4. Then cut a groove around the inside ofthe drawer parts. Finally, assemble the drawers with glue in thejoints and in the grooves.

INSERT PIGEONHOLE UNIT FROM REAR OF DESK

A Course In Wood Turning

A Course In Wood Turning

Ever wondered what wood turning is all about? Here are some invaluable information on how to make beautiful items out of wood! That one little strategy from A Course In Wood Turning that I implemented not only worked, but the results were completely astonishing. I had never seen anything like it! Now, keep in mind that I had tried a lot of other products up until this point. You name it, I probably tried it! That’s how desperate I was to improve my skills with wood turning.

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