This arch is built with segments and splines for strength Then a simple shopbuilt jig is used for assembly arid routing

NOTE Use more segments, not wider ones, to minimize waste on large arches utting an arch for a project like the full-length mirror can be an interesting challenge. You may think the easiest way to do this is to find a piece of stock wide and flat enough for the size you need, see Fig. 1. But there are a couple problems. The first problem is waste. You end up throwing away a lot of wood after the arch is cut free. The other problem has to do with grain direction. No matter how you lay out the...

This fulllength mirror is designed to stand on the floor or be hung up out of the way on a wall

Here were a couple things that made building this full-JL length mirror enjoyable. One was building a segmented arch. The other was the straightforward construction. Together they provided just the right blend of woodworking techniques to keep things interesting. Now, don't think the segmented arch was added to this project as a gimmick to spice-up the mirror design. If s there to solve two basic problems with cutting arches out of solid pieces of stock. One is how to avoid weak cross grain and...

Box joints are strong and attractive And they dont require any special tools just a table saw a miter gauge and a

Here are a lot of reasons for using JL box joints. They're strong. They don't require any special tools or expensive jigs. And they look good. They can be used to dress up a project, like the stacking boxes or the planter. And for other projects, like the magazine boxes, they can give a stately, old-fashioned feel. interlocking fingers. Box joints are made up of alternating pins and slots, see drawing below. The pins on mating pieces interlock like tiny fingers. This creates a lot of good glue...

Tall Featherboard

I use a table saw when cutting grooves in the edge of a workpiece. But to keep tall pieces stable during the cut, I made a tall feather-board that applies pressure to the full face of the board. unusual and doesn't look like a traditional feather-board. Thaf s because I use a piece of hardboard that acts like a spring to apply the pressure, see Fig. 1. This hardboard fits snug in an angled saw kerf cut in a L-shaped block. Yet it's easy to adjust for different stock sizes. The block is attached...

Like the logs on a log cabin the pins on these box joints extend past the sides and ends of this redwood planter to

Box Section Joint

I I ere in Iowa, a flood of flower and JL JL garden catalogs arrive around the first of the year. After looking through the pages, I decided a planter box to hold some of these flowers would make an interesting spring project But the problem with most planters is the bottom rots out from the moisture in the soil. To solve this, I made a redwood box that fits around a plastic liner. This box holds the liner securely and hides it at the same time. Also, to add highlight to these planters, I used...

Cut Wedges On Band

Woodworking Unique Jig

Here's a quick and easy a carrier board with a way to cut wedges on a cutout that matches the band saw so they're all the wedge shape, see Fig. 1. same size and shape. I use Just place your stock in the cutout and slide the carrier board along the rip fence, see Fig. 2. After each wedge is cut free, flip the stock over before cutting out the next wedge. k This tall featherboard slides in the miter slot and is locked in position by tightening the wing nuts. A piece of hardboard is used to apply...

Suspended Extension Cords

Getting electrical power to The drop cord runs your workbench in the center of the shop can be a problem. A drop cord works, butyou risk tripping over it or even cutting the cord. So I raise the cord up off the floor and protect it in plastic electrical conduit. inside the conduit from the outlet to your workbench. Note YouU have to remove the plug or receptical end first so the cord can be pulled through the conduit Nick Cicora RosweU, Georgia Extra cord can be pulled back into conduit Conduit...

This table features everything youd expect of a craftsmanstyle table quartersawn oak square spindles and mortise and

Chamfer Routing

Lywood or solid wood That's the choice you have to make when a project includes a wide panel. Often, I'll choose plywood since it doesn't expand and contract with changes in humidity as much as solid wood. But I decided against using plywood on this project for a couple reasons. For one thing, quartersawn oak is hard to find in plywood. And beveling the top edge wouldn't work without framing the edges with hardwood. Since solid wood was the only option for the panels, I had to come up with a...

A maximum amount of storage in a minimum amount of space Thats the basic idea behind this unique box joint project

Gj hree-tiered storage that's the JL concept behind these boxes. The three boxes stack on top of each other in any order, and a frame and panel lid covers the box that's on top. To hold each box together, I used 1 4 box joints. And to continue the W pattern of the box joints, I built the boxes so there would be a Vi space between them when they are stacked on top of each other, see margin draw ing on page 15. Then to add a little bit of contrast to the project, I decided to use two different...

These simple boxes provide a convenient and stately way to store magazines And they dont take much time or material to

Plywood Box Joints

It seems like magazines pile up faster than I can read them. And once I've read them, I can never find a convenient place to put them. That's why I like these magazine storage boxes. They will keep your magazines organized, and they look handsome on a shelf or bookcase. glue up panels. I began building the boxes by gluing up panels from thick stock. Each box requires three 12 x 10 panels. To hold the panels flat, I built a simple jig, see box below. Once the glue dries, you can begin cutting...