Like the logs on a log cabin the pins on these box joints extend past the sides and ends of this redwood planter to give it a rustic appeal

I I ere in Iowa, a flood of flower and JL JL garden catalogs arrive around the first of the year. After looking through the pages, I decided a planter box to hold some of these flowers would make an interesting spring project But the problem with most planters is the bottom rots out from the moisture in the soil. To solve this, I made a redwood box that fits around a plastic liner. This box holds the liner securely and hides it at the same time.

Also, to add highlight to these planters, I used box joints with extended pins. Making the pins a little longer calls attention to the joint.

Note: This planter works two ways. It can sit on a deck, or by building a pair of brackets, it can hang on a wall.

To build this planter, you simply make a bottomless box to fit around the plastic liner. But since liners come in various sizes, if s a good idea to have the liner before you start to build.

sides & ends. With the liner in hand, you'll need to take a few measurements to determine the size for the sides (A) and ends (B). First it has to be tall enough to cover the liner (my liner was bW deep). So my pieces were cut from a 1x8 piece of redwood, see drawing at left.

But determining the length of the pieces isn't quite as easy. You have to work from the inside out First, measure the length underneath the lip of the liner that runs around the top edge, see detail 'b'. Then add in a little extra for clearance (about %")■

Next add the length of the box joint at each end (%") • For the 28 %"-long liner I used, my sides were 30%" and the ends were 8" long.

Nowtheboxjointscanbecut (For more on this refer to page 22.) The goal is to end up with either a full slot or pin. To do that, I used the table saw and trimmed the waste from my sides and ends, see Fig. 1. My pieces ended up 63/i6n high (wide).

chamfer pins. Then to complete the box joints, I added a decorative Vie" chamfer to the ends of the pins. What's a little unusual is how you cut the chamfer on the inside of the pins. I used the box joint jig.

'/is" chamfer

Liner

NOTE: Base raises planter height of one pin

Box Section Joint

CROSS SECTION

Plastic liner

V dowel

NOTE: Allparts made from C'/i6u acutal) stock thickness

V dowel

CROSS SECTION

NOTE: Base raises planter height of one pin

'/is" chamfer

Plastic liner

Liner

Just tilt the blade to 45° and reposition the jig, see Figs. 2 and 2a. Then to chamfer the outside edges, remove the box joint jig and use the rip fence, see Figs. 3 and 3a.

assembly. With the pins chamfered, the box can be assembled. But rather than glue the joints and have to clean up squeeze-out around the protruding pins, I pinned the joints with a W dowel, see detail 'a' in exploded view. To do this, just drill a hole from the top and bottom sides at all four corners and tap in the dowels.

a. CROSS SECTION

#8x V/2° Fh woodscrew (galvanized)

A A pair of notched brackets hold the planter box securely in place when attached to a wall. Yet it's easy to remove the planter by simply lifting the box off the brackets.

BASE OR BRACKETS

At this point the "box" is complete, but the project isn't If s designed with a couple options. You can add a base or a pair of arched brackets.

base. If you want the planter to sit on a deck, you'll need a base. It raises the planter up and makes it easier to grasp. The base is just four pieces of redwood, two base sides (C) and two base ends (D), cut to fit inside the box and glued in place, see exploded view detail 'b'. Note: Allow about n/i6n of the base to extend below the box. This matches the pin width.

bracket. However, if you intend to hang the planter, you'll need to build a pair of brackets to hold the box, see the photo below. The bracket consists of two pieces: a mounting board and a support

The mounting board (E) is a x 12V4" piece of redwood chamfered on the outside edges with four holes drilled in it see Fig. 4. Attached to the mounting board is an arch shaped support (F). It's notched on top to keep the box from sliding off. The distance between the notches matches the inside width of your box. (Mine was 6%".) To make the support draw the arch, cut it out on the band saw, and then sand up to the line, see Fig. 4a.

Finally, rout a W chamfer on the outside edges of the arched support and glue and screw the support to the mounting board. (S3

a. CROSS SECTION

A A pair of notched brackets hold the planter box securely in place when attached to a wall. Yet it's easy to remove the planter by simply lifting the box off the brackets.

NOTE: Remove waste from workpiece to end up with a full pin or full slot ,yA

Waste

Finished piece -

Waste

Finished piece -

NOTE: Adjust box joint jig so blade cuts a Vm'chamfer on inside edge

0. NOTE: Flip workpiece around to cut both inside edges

NOTE: Set saw blade to 45°

NOTE: Adjust box joint jig so blade cuts a Vm'chamfer on inside edge

NOTE: Set saw blade to 45°

0. NOTE: Flip workpiece around to cut both inside edges

CROSS SECTION

Rip Fence

NOTE: Flip workpiece around to chamfer both sides

Workpiece

NOTE: Remove box joint jig and adjust rip fence to chamfer outside edges of pins

NOTE:

Set saw blade to 45°

Workpiece

Rip fence

MOUNTING #8 x 2V2" Fh BOARD woodscrew (galvanized)

SUPPORT

NOTE: Planter box is held in place by notches in support, see detail a.

MOUNTING #8 x 2V2" Fh BOARD woodscrew (galvanized)

SUPPORT

NOTE: Planter box is held in place by notches in support, see detail a.

#8x V/2° Fh woodscrew (galvanized)

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