These simple boxes provide a convenient and stately way to store magazines And they dont take much time or material to build

It seems like magazines pile up faster than I can read them. And once I've read them, I can never find a convenient place to put them.

That's why I like these magazine storage boxes. They will keep your magazines organized, and they look handsome on a shelf or bookcase.

glue up panels. I began building the boxes by gluing up panels from thick stock. Each box requires three 12" x 10" panels. To hold the panels flat, I built a simple jig, see box below.

Once the glue dries, you can begin cutting the panels to length. (They'll be cut to width later.) Cut the two side panels to a length of 93/4". Then cut the third panel into two 41/&"-long pieces for the front and back.

box joints. The sides (A) and ends (B) of the box are joined together with box joints. Although they look time-consuming, the box joints are easy to make using a simple jig, see page 22.

When you're cutting this many box joints, setting up the jig accurately is very important. Even if you're off by only a fraction of an inch, when you multiply that error by the number of pins you're cutting, it can really add up. So much so that the pins and slots might not even fit together.

To prevent this, I tested my setup by cutting box joints on a couple of 12"-long scrap pieces. Then I made sure they fit together smoothly.

bottom. After cutting the box joints, the pieces can be cut to finished width. I cut mine ll3/4" wide, but the exact dimension isn't critical. What you want to end up with is a full pin at the top and bottom of each side piece and a full slot at the top and bottom of each end piece, see detail 'a' next page.

The next step is to cut a V^'-deep

HOLD-DOWN

«8x1V Fh woodscrew

CLEAT

-thick plywood)

paper

NOTE:

For more information on cutting wedges, refer to page 4

CLAMPING JIG

NOTE:

Rub paraffin on wedges over glue joints to prevent WEDGES

sticking

CLEAT

This jig solves one of the most difficult problems in gluing up panels from thin stock holding the panels flat while they're being clamped.

The jig consists of two cleats screwed down to a plywood base. Then hold-down ribs are screwed to the cleats. And small wedges placed underneath the ribs keep the panel pieces from shifting and bowing.

Note: I used waxed paper under the panel and paraffin wax on the wedges to avoid accidentally gluing the panel to the wedges and base of the jig.

-thick plywood)

HOLD-DOWN

«8x1V Fh woodscrew paper

NOTE:

For more information on cutting wedges, refer to page 4

groove on the inside face of all four pieces. The width of this groove is sized to fit a bottom of W-thick hard-board, see detail 'b'.

To determine the width and length of the bottom (C), dry assemble the box and measure the bottom opening, including the depths of the grooves. Now subtract Vie" from each dimension to allow for clearance. Then cut the bottom piece to size.

ASSEMBLY

To make it easier to get magazines in and out, the back corner of the box is cut away. But if you do this before assembling the box, ifs difficult to position a clamp across the top of the box. So I glued and clamped up the box before starting on the cutaway.

And even though this is a small project, the box joints can make assembling it a bit tricky. To give myself a little more time, I used white glue since it doesn't set up as fast as yellow glue.

I also used a lot of clamps to help pull the box joints together, see Fig. 1. You may need to reposition some of the clamps as you're assembling the box to apply pressure where you need it.

One more thing. Since the grooves for the bottom are visible on the sides of the box, you will need to make and glue some small wooden plugs into these gaps, see detail 'c'.

cutaway. After the glue was dry and the pins were sanded flush, I laid out a gentle double-curve on one side of the box, see detail'd'. (I used a large coffee can to draw the arcs.)

To get a smooth cut on the straight section of the cutaway, I used a table saw, see Fig. 2. Then I completed the cut using a band saw, see Fig. 3.

Va hardboard

After cutting the curve, sand it make the box easier to pull off a shelf, smooth with a drum sander. Then see Sources on page 35. Note: Hie round over all the outside edges with screws that come with the pull are too a y8" round-over bit and a router. long. YouH need to purchase a couple adding a pull. After wiping on an oil of 1/t" brass screws to use as replace-

finish, I added a brass card file pull to ments, see detail 'b'. ES

Cut straight section on table saw

NOTE:

For more information on cutting box joints refer to page 22

Plywood Box Joints

NOTE: For more information on card file pull refer to page 35

grain direction

NOTE: For more information on card file pull refer to page 35

NOTE:

For more information on cutting box joints refer to page 22

grain direction

CROSS SECTION

23/a" x 7%" brass card file pull

Va hardboard

NOTE:

Use clamps as needed to pull joints together

, Miter gauge auxiliary fence

, Miter gauge auxiliary fence

Cut straight section on table saw

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Responses

  • belba
    How to cut box joints on large panels?
    6 years ago

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