The Pendulum Door

The glass door that fits over the pendulum is probably the most difficult part of this project. The pieces are small to begin with, but then there's a rabbet cut on each side to make them even smaller.

To make this door, I ripped several small strips %" x 13/is", see Detail A in Fig. 10. One edge of each strip is rounded over, and then a W x W deep rabbet is cut below the rounded-over edge. (This rabbet will be the inside edge of the door.)

Now you have to cut pieces from these strips to fit the door frame. This takes a little measuring, and a lot of luck. Here's how I went about it.

I knew I wanted the door to over-lap the frame by j/k". (The rabbet on the outside of the door is W wide, but the overlap is only Vs" because I wanted to leave Vs" for clearance.) Going back to the ease, I marked a line Vs" from the inside edge of the door frame. Wherever the marked line crossed a joint line, that was the length of each piece for the door.

Once the pieces have been cut to length, grooves are routed for the splines, and splines are cut to fit the grooves. For assembly, this door is small enough to allow hand-pressure gluing at all joints.

After the glue is dry, the out si tie edges are rounded over — again with a %" corner-round bit on the router table, see Fig. 11. Then a W x W rabbet is cut on the outside edge using a straight bit and the fence on the router table, Fig. 12.

To finish the door, glass is cut to shape, and then V{ x V* stops are cut and glued into the rabbets to hold the glass in place.

To mount the door to the frame, first cut two small filler blocks and glue them to the door directly across from the notches in the frame, Fig. 13. Then the hinges can be screwed in place.

the back. As shown in Fig. 14, the plywood back for the clock case is cut in half. The bottom half is tacked in place. But the top half is hinged to the case so it can be opened to get to the movement. Since this back can be seen through the glass door, 1 used W oak plywood.

mounting the movement. The 334IX movement has four mounting brackets so it can be screwed to the plywood insert in the octagonal frame. The chimes also have

FIGURE 14

their own mounting bracket that's screwed to the top of the case.

finishing. i used Watco Danish Oil to finish this clock case. The nice thing about this oil is that it can be used to till any gaps between all of those mitered joints. Apply a liberal amount of oil and sand with 220-grit silicon carbide paper. This creates a"goop'' that fills the gaps (and the pores in the oak). When the gaps are filled, wipe off the excess "goop," let it dry (24 hours), and add another coat of oil.

TACK BOTTOM HALF INTO RABBETS

V,~ PLYWOOD BACK

TACK BOTTOM HALF INTO RABBETS

V,~ PLYWOOD BACK

PENDULUM

FIGURE 10

45 MITER

AUGN BLOCKS WfTH HINGES MORTISES ON DOOR FRAME

PENDULUM

AUGN BLOCKS WfTH HINGES MORTISES ON DOOR FRAME

FIGURE 10

45 MITER

DETAIL A

DETAIL A

ROUND

OVER

EDGE

MITER

ENDS

GROOVE

SPLINE

V CORNER ROUND

ROUND

OVER

EDGE

MITER

ENDS

GROOVE

SPLINE

V CORNER ROUND

FIGURE )1

ROUND OVER OUTSIDE EDGE

FIGURE I 3

FIGURE )1

ROUND OVER OUTSIDE EDGE

SPACER BLOCK

MORTISE IN OOOR FRAME

1." BUTT HINGE

FIGURE I 3

1." BUTT HINGE

SPACER BLOCK

MORTISE IN OOOR FRAME

HANGER

BEZEL LATCH

HINGE

FIGURE 14

HANGER

BEZEL LATCH

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment