Va I V

NOTE; MIDDLE STRIP

V," it TONGUE

FIGURE 9

FIGURE ID

PANEL

stop groove Vi" from end

STOP GROOVE Vi" FROM END

•A" QUARTER ROUND WITH SHOULDER,

bottom frame

FIGURE 11

TOP VIEW OF BASE

CORNER DETAIL

THROUGH GROOVE FOR SPLINE

SPLINE

NOTE: BASE SIDES 2V." WIDE

FIGURE 12

FIGURE 13

top panel

CORNER

TOP INSIDE , FRAME

BOTTOM PANEL

FILLER STRIP

PILLER STRfP

(A BOTTOM INSIDE FRAME

DRAWER \GUIDE

BASE FRAME

CENTER ^ INSIDE FRAME

«" QUARTER ROUND WITH SHOULDER

KICKBOARD BASE

thickness as the frames. However, the strip on the middle frame should be flush with the top of the frame and extend Vi' below the bottom of the frame, Fig. 7.

TOP AND BOTTOM FRAMES

Once again you have to make two more frames joined with a miter and spline. One of these frames is for the top of the cabinet, while the other frame is part of the base of the cabinet.

Since both frames are the same size, I started by ripping four long pieces (H) and four short pieces (I) to 2%" wide. The length of each of these pieces is shown in Figure 8. That is, these are the lengths if everything has gone perfectly up to now. In reality, these pieces are cut to fit the actual dimensions of the cabinet.

The bottom frame has the most critical fit because of the way the shouldered quarter-round fits around the perimeter of the cabinet, see Fig. 13,1 got the measurements for this frame, and used it as a standard for the top frame.

Measure the width and depth of the cabinet as it stands. Add the width of both quarter round cuts (this should be a total of 1"), and then add an extra This extra %" is for the space between the quarter-round cut and the perimeter of the cabinet. Now, all eight pieces for both the bottom and top frames can be cut to these measurements.

to i* frame. After the pieces for the top frame are cut to length and the ends are mitered, stopped spline grooves must be cut on each mitered end. Then 'A" x V.\" grooves are cut on the inside edges.

Next, a panel (J) is built to fit inside this frame. The panel is glued up of solid wood and then cut to size Ya" smaller than the groove to groove measurement. Finally Vt" x lA" tongues are cut to fit in the grooves in the frame, Fig. 9.

Before attaching the top frame, the drawer runners should be screwed into place, Fig. 7. Then a V.i" x 'A" rabbet is cut around the entire back side of the cabinet for the Vi" plywood back.

BOTTOM FRAME. Now back to the bottom frame. The four pieces for the bottom frame are already cut to length and mitered, so all that's left is to cut the stopped spline grooves. Before assembling this frame, rabbets are cut along one edge to accept the base (kickboard).

the hase. At last there's something easy. The base is just four boards (M and N) joined with a miter and spline. After it's assembled, the bottom frame is glued onto it. Then this assembly is screwed to the bottom of the cabinet. Fig. 13.

CLASS DOOR AND SIDE PANELS

The glass door and the two side panels are miter-and-spline frames. (We wouldn't want to break the monotony at this point.)

Although the basic construction of these frames is exactly like all the rest of the frames, there are a couple of little changes.

All 12 pieces for these frames are ripped to a width of W, and cut to rough length. Then all pieces are cut to final length (miter ed) to fit the openings in the cabinet. {To get these pieces to fit, measure the openings and add a total of V-i — this is so the frames overlap the openings Va" on each side.)

SPLINE GROOVES. Here are the changes. On these frames the spline grooves are cut all the way through (from edge to edge), and they're positioned off-center so they don't interfere with the molding cuts on the face of the frames.

First, I made the molding cuts on the inside edges of all these pieces with a Va" quarter-round bit, leaving a Va" shoulder. Then 1 cut a V* wide by deep rabbet below the molding cut. Fig. 15.

The spline grooves can now be aligned and cut so they don't trim off any part of the quarter-round cut. Next, the splines are cut and the frames are assembled.

After the glue is dry, the same type of Vi' quarter-round cut is made around the outside edges of each frame.

RABBETS. The rabbets on the outside edge of the door frame and the side frames are slightly different. On the side frames the rabbets are cut so the frames fit tightly in the openings. It's best to sneak up on the cuts to get a snug fit. Then these frames are glued into the openings.

The rabbets on the door frame are cut %" wide so there's enough clearance for the hinges (Fig. 17), and so the door can be opened easily.

the glass. Once the frames are built, they need some glass. I took the frames to a local store to have the glass cut to size. While they were at it, I had them cut a glass shelf for inside the cabinet.

The glass shelf is mounted with small L-bracket shelf supports. The glass for the doors and side panels is mounted with Vî' x Va" stops.

the drawer. The last step on this cabinet is to build the drawer. The drawer front is lipped, which means there are rabbets on all four inside edges. Once the drawer front has been rabbeted (see Fig. 19), the sides are joined to the front with a half-blind rabbet and dado joint. Then the back is joined to the sides with a normal rabbet and dado.

Before assembling the drawer, I cut one more shouldered quarter-round cut around the perimeter of the drawer front.

finishing. To finish this cabinet 1 applied twœ^oats of M in wax Walnut stain. When the stain was thoroughly dry, I brushed on three coats of Hope's Tung Oil Varnish. This oil finish has just enough varnish in it to add a gloss to the finish, and it's very easy to apply.

FIGURE

FIGURE 15

' shoulder

00or frame

lgroove w deep for spline note:

SIDE FRAME

wsgfc

<A" QUARTER ROUND WITH SHOULDER

FIGURE 19

FIGURE 17

door frame

Mi* QUARTER ROUND WITH SHOUtDER DRAWER FRONT

TOP VIEW

V RABBET

wooden stop for glass

FIGURE IB

W PLYWOOD BACK

corner detail

GLASS

back rests on plywood

W * '/." groove glue side glass frames in place

Vt PLYWOOD BOTTOM

FIGURE 14

FIGURE 14

Woods mi tu

Hall Mirror

We designed this hall mirror as a companion piece for the Curio Cabinet shown on page 12. (The photo at right shows what a handsome couple they make.)

As with the Curio Cabinet, the frame for this mirror is constructed with miter and spline joints. And once again, I cut these joints on a router table. I also used a Sea rs router and trammel-point attachment to cut the half-round section at the top of the frame.

THE ROUND TOP. To build the frame, I stai-ted at the top and worked my way down (that's the story of my life). The half-round section at the top starts out as half of an octagon.

First I cut the four pieces (A) S:,A" wide and about 9" long. Then I mitered both ends at 22 Vz° so the final length (from point to point) was 81/»".

Next, stopped grooves are cut for the splines. These grooves must stop no more than 2'A" from the inside edge to leave enough room where the half circles will be routed, Fig. 1.

assembly. When gluing these pieces together, the two open ends of this half-octagon should form a straight line. They didn't on mine, so I used the jig (shown on the next page) to trim the ends square.

routing the top. After trimming the ends, I left the half-octagon tacked to the jig (which is just a piece of plywood) in order to make the two circular cuts to form the half-round top. To make these cuts, 1 tacked a piece of scrap pine to the edge of the plywood. Then I drilled a Vs pivot hole for the trammel attachment.

To rout the half circles, I made successive passes with a ]A" straight bit. When routing the inside radius, the trammel attachment is set so the distance between the pivot hole and the outside edge of the bit is 7%". For the outside radius, set the distance between the pivot hole and the inside edge of the bit at 10", These settings make the frame 2%" wide.

the sides and bottom. Once the half-circle top is cut, the two sides (B) are cut to width (equal to the width of the half-circle). Then the bottom ends are mitered at 45° so the final length is 38".

The bottom piece (C) is also mitered at 45°, making sure the point to point length is equal to the outside diameter of the half-circle, see Fig. 4.

Finally, these three pieces are added to the half-circle top with miter and spline joints to complete the frame,

MOLDING AND RABBET CLTS. After the glue was dry on the frame, I cut a shoul-

figure 3

FIGURE 4

FIGURE 2

TACK SPACER BLOCK TO PlYWOOD AND FIND CENTER "STAR"

TACK HALF-OCTAGON FROM BOTTOM

FIGURE i

STOPPED GROOVE

figure 3

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