But thats the only thing Id change and thats eight years later

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One of the first modifications Wait made to his tablesaw was to install this knee-operated, spring-tensioned panic switch. This way, Walt can keep both hands—and his attention—on the workpiece. "The switch was hard to get at," Walt explains, "so I put a crash bar across it so 1 could push it with my knee. No matter where you hit it, ail you need is a quarter inch of travel to shut the saw down."

Even a simple Segl project, like this magazine rack, carries the look and feel of period furniture.

It might be more work, but Walt Segl prefers hand-scraping to sanding when he wants to bring out distinctive grain patterns. The glass-fronted cabinet above is a perfect example. Walt hand-scraped the wood to avoid the nibs that often appear during sanding. To bring out the pattern even more, Walt applied boiled linseed oil, finishing it with six coats of dewaxed orange shellac rubbed out by hand.

One of the first modifications Wait made to his tablesaw was to install this knee-operated, spring-tensioned panic switch. This way, Walt can keep both hands—and his attention—on the workpiece. "The switch was hard to get at," Walt explains, "so I put a crash bar across it so 1 could push it with my knee. No matter where you hit it, ail you need is a quarter inch of travel to shut the saw down."

woodworker's profile ne look at Walt Segl's Early American furniture and you might think you couldn't create anything like Chat. Walt disagrees. "The average woodworker, with some training, is capable of building really fine furniture," he insists.

Walt, who is president of the Society of American Period Fur-nituremakers (SAPFM), directs interested furnituremakers to www.sapfm.org. The site contains a forum; a gallery of pictures of members' works; and links to research pieces, which evolved from English styles of the 17th and 18th centuries.

"SAPFM turned me on to building complex furniture styles and working more with hand tools," says Walt, who started woodworking at age 10 with his dad. Bud. "And it's been challenging and fun."

Bud is the accomplished carver and finisher, Walt reports. He's made all kinds of things with his son—"furniture, sailboats, you name it."

Wall has two pieces of advice: Research the piece thoroughly and draft a good set of plans; also, learn a new skill with each piece you build.

"Reproducing period furniture requires interpreting design and expressing the character and finesse of the original," Walt says. With practice and patience, he says, anyone can do it.

Even a simple Segl project, like this magazine rack, carries the look and feel of period furniture.

It might be more work, but Walt Segl prefers hand-scraping to sanding when he wants to bring out distinctive grain patterns. The glass-fronted cabinet above is a perfect example. Walt hand-scraped the wood to avoid the nibs that often appear during sanding. To bring out the pattern even more, Walt applied boiled linseed oil, finishing it with six coats of dewaxed orange shellac rubbed out by hand.

Photographs: Paul Anthony

followed the advice of a trusted mentor and outfitted a complete woodworking headquarters all at once.

Refusing to add tools in piecemeal fashion, Randy Zimmerman followed the advice of a trusted mentor and outfitted a complete woodworking headquarters all at once.

Refusing to add tools in piecemeal fashion, Randy Zimmerman

The best woodworking advice Randy Zimmerman received had nothing to do with technique, what kind of wood to use, or even shop safety. Says the 47-year-old mechanic for the Iowa Air National Guard: "The advice was, if you're going to build a shop, don't get into it halfway, with cheap equipment, and upgrade as you go. Wait until you can afford to buy the best equipment, then jump in with both feet.' "

As he did with other words of wisdom from Arliss Boothe, his neighbor and woodworking guru, Randy listened and heeded. The result is the quintessentially equipped shop he built six years ago in his garage, a short walk from his central Iowa home.

For example, when he bought his planer, he went for a 20" model instead of economizing on a smaller machine. "Yes, most people don't have a 20" planer in their shop," Randy

Tablesaw

Downdraft sanding /outfeed table

Router table

Shaper

Hanging clamp racks and hardware cabinets have simple, practical designs. Spring clamps, bar clamps, and C-clamps simply hang from their jaws onto rails screwed onto a wall. "If I built it," Randy says, "it's not fancy!"

Randy Zimmerman took about a year to plan and equip his new shop the way he desired, and as such, it wants for little. A centrally located tablesaw and nearby workbench afford him two major work centers, and he's just steps away from other machine tools, as well as wood storage.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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