Hopefully my next shop will be much bigger Matt Fuller says with a laugh But if I had the same constraints Id apply the same principles I did here The largest tools go in first then the next largest and so on

Woodshop Storage Solutions

Matt's jointer came with casters. "But the wheels were old-school steel wheels," he relates. "Lugging that thing across the shop and down a ramp and into the dirt got real tedious." So he fashioned an 1-shaped mobile platform out of 2x4s that not only makes the tool easier to move but also elevates the worksurface to the same height as his tablesaw. Cross braces on the jointer stand work well to support his 12" portable planer. Lap joints make the platform sturdy: Locking casters mounted to the bottom of the platform allow Matt to keep the unit from moving around when he's ready to joint stock.

Matt's store-bought workbench was collapsible. He didn't want that. "I wanted my bench to be rock solid." To accomplish that, he disabled the fold-down capability so the table locked in the open position. Then, he added casters for mobility. Installing plywood cross braces keeps items from falling off the shelf and helps prevent the base from racking. He also drilled 1" holes in the top for bench dogs.

att Fuller walked into his dorm room on his first day at Texas A&M University to see his roommate, Ben Smith, constructing a ioft. Their shared interest in woodworking later resulted in the rustic-style kitchen chairs {fur right) the pair created in the shop of Ben's grandfather.

Matt had built a few simple things with his father. "But my uncle was really into it. He built bedposts, boxes, chests, and tables," Matt recalls. "I regret that 1 never worked with him on woodworking." Nevertheless, his uncle bequeathed his entire shop to Matt, who moved to Illinois with his wife of two years, Kerri.

Between class work and leaching assignments. Matt strives to be worthy of his uncle's inheritance. "1 ask around and read up on a lot of things." he says, "But I'm never going to be as good as he was. I just hope that one day I know how to use all the tools he gave me."

Photographs: Jackie Haggerty, Studio J. Photography

From a tiny shop, Matt Fuller created the mesquite-and-pecan cutting board (far right). He cut the star on his bandsaw, helped by a sled like taper jig and a 360° protractor. In a squared" piece, he routed a groove, and fitted it with a corresponding piece of pecan. Angled pieces defined the pattern. "I planed a few high spots, sanded the whole thing, and finished it with butcher block oil," Matt relates. The cedar chair (above right) is from a set Matt and a roommate made in college to go with a kitchen table.

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