Paint Cabinet

The 1:18-scale 1931 Chevy Cabriolet that Tom built (left) contains more than 500 parts. "Everything that could move on the real one moves on this one," assures Tom, who estimates he spent about 2,500 hours making six of the models. The mission-style nightstand (above) in the master bedroom took less time. Tom made the quartersawn white oak top wider than most similar pieces to match the proportions of the bed, and taller so it could contain four drawers instead of the traditional three.

Tom designed his paint and finish-supply cabinet to—what else?—maximize space and keep himself organized. Tom didn t need deep wing doors and could hang the doors on simple continuous hinges. "Anything that can, hangs, Tom explains; for example, brushes hang from nails. The entire cabinet measures about 16

deep with the doors shut. Theres plenty of space for what might be needed in the future woodworker's profile

Some of Tom Whal ley's fondest memories are of building things with his father, Fred. That's why so many of his dad's tools grace his newly built home workshop.

"Dad was a tinkerer," Tom recalls. "He was always building somethi ng, designing something. The first thing he and I built together was a workbench. One year we built a jungle gym out of 2x4s and iron pipe."

In high school. Tom's design abilities resulted in special treatment. "I just raced through the projects, and the instructor ran out of things for me to do," Tom remembers. "So he assigned me projects for his home." Now, Tom designs and builds things for his own home, such as the nightstand (at right) as well as the five-piece bedroom set that serves as the centerpiece of the master suite.

Looking for things to do in the Army drove him to the base's woodshop. "I lived there," he marvels. "They had an arsenal of tools. I was introduced to an awful lot of machines."

Tom equates the creativity of woodworking with his career as an account executive. "Working with wood is all about designing, building, and finishing something," he reasons. "In my job, I design relationships with clients, build them, and polish them. All that's missing is the sawdust."

The 1:18-scale 1931 Chevy Cabriolet that Tom built (left) contains more than 500 parts. "Everything that could move on the real one moves on this one," assures Tom, who estimates he spent about 2,500 hours making six of the models. The mission-style nightstand (above) in the master bedroom took less time. Tom made the quartersawn white oak top wider than most similar pieces to match the proportions of the bed, and taller so it could contain four drawers instead of the traditional three.

Photographer-. Jason Donnelly Illustrations: Roxanne LeMoine

Woodshop Storage Solutions

From his rustic workshop, a Northwest carver continues a legacy of artwork tripledefig

The "Dance Plaza House Posts" commemorate a S'Klallam tribe legend.

From his rustic workshop, a Northwest carver continues a legacy of artwork that immortalizes a long-standing Native American community.

tripledefig

Dale Faulstich goes through woodworking shops the way some go through cars, "This is the fifth shop I've had in my life." says the renowned carver of Northwest Native American totem poles, like the twin posts shown at right, and other artwork. But just like the vehicle you customize to a T, he's found his keeper.

He's learned from each previous shop's deficiencies and applied those lessons to the next. Each one evolved in design and efficiency. Along the way, he's acquired new tools and replaced others. However, his radial-arm saw—the first power tool he ever bought—is left over from his first dedicated shop, in the carriage house of a rented two-story Victorian. That was about 10 miles from where he lives today, on five acres in rural Sequim, Washington, on the Olympic Peninsula northwest of Seattle.

In this wooded area, he's built a shop designed for his work: carving masks, sculptures, and furniture pieces. (See page 25.) "The shop is designed specifi cally for whaL 1 do," he acknowledges. "But I think that every carver and woodworker could lake advantage of some of the things I've done here,"

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Wood Working 101

Wood Working 101

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