What I would like to add is more volt outlets and maybe a dustcollection system I get along pretty well without them but every now and then I think I would get along even better if I had them

A 10x12' overhead door in Dale's "sawdust room" makes it easy to bring large workpieces—and machines—in and out. Dale made the floor level with the outside so if necessary, he can drive a truck into the space to load or unload items.

ABOVE: Dale designed this bench exclusively for carving models of totem poles, on which he works out details for full-size versions. The bench holds the workpiece just as a lathe chuck holds turning stock. Dale can rotate the workpiece to any angle, then lock it into position with a clamp for hands-free carving. Locks at one end hold the workpiece in place.

design for each project," Dale says. "If you start with a good design, even if you cheat on the craftsmanship, the finished product will still be good. But if you start with a poor design, no matter how good your craftsmanship, the finished product will be poor. So, I spend many hours sitting there."

Dale's woodworking has come a long way since the first room he devoted to his craft after moving to Washington state in 1973: the living room of a house he rented. "I had no garage or basement, so I moved all the furniture out of the living room and put my tools there," he remembers.

Having relocated to the Northwest and established himself as a carver. Dale and his wife. Heather, built a house, complete with workshop, in 1979. A desire to stay put led to the acreage where they've lived for 30 years.

ABOVE: For Dale, every project begins at the drawing table and desk he created out of birch plywood and alder framing. He also constructed the cabinets above and on floor level to match.

ABOVE: Dale designed this bench exclusively for carving models of totem poles, on which he works out details for full-size versions. The bench holds the workpiece just as a lathe chuck holds turning stock. Dale can rotate the workpiece to any angle, then lock it into position with a clamp for hands-free carving. Locks at one end hold the workpiece in place.

Dale didn't buiid his current shop simply to make it bigger. "I built it so I could have space for higher-quality tools, which I could afford because 1 was making a better living," he explains. "One of the things I learned is thai if you're going to upgrade, have a purpose to it."

Dale's space suits him perfectly. And it's a keeper.

Dale had to put up a 2,400-sq-ft building on tribal land to give him and a crew enough room to construct his totem poles, which can be as tall as 49'.

Dale stands beside one of the 10 poles he crafted for the 7 Cedars Casino on the tribal homeland. The art at the base of the pole depicts a whale hunter peering between tail flukes, reminding viewers of the S'Klailam's whale-hunting heritage.

Photographs: Dennis Collins Photography woodworker's profile

Just oui of the Coast Guard in !972, Dale Faulstich pul his artistry to good use, doing commercial work for the Jamestown S'Klallam Native American community, located in Sequim, Washington. "I did various signs, carved doors for the tribal administration building, and vehicle lettering, using native motifs in carving," Dale recalls. 'The more I did, the more fascinated I was with their art. So I learned more about it and eventually carved totem poles as a hobby."

In 1993, the tribe was ready to open a casino and approached Dale to provide 10 totem poles for that enterprise. Tribal officials liked Dale's 6'-diameter. 49'-high efforts so much, they asked him to do more. Since then, he's created poles for medical plazas, dental clinics, and other sites. "There's so much to do," Dale says, "and each project is different."

Besides being involved in various tribal projects, Dale is helping to carry on the native art tradition by teaching classes in designing and carving traditional objects, and is the subject of a book about the craft. (See page 25.) He and his family— wife, Heather; daughter, Holly; and son, Tyler—live in the house they built in 1979. For more information about Dale's art, visit www.olvpen.com/hhtd.

On the tribe's South Campus, Dale's 45' pole depicts four traditional tales. Dale decided which tales to use based on the creatures he encountered during walks in the woods.

Dale had to put up a 2,400-sq-ft building on tribal land to give him and a crew enough room to construct his totem poles, which can be as tall as 49'.

Dale stands beside one of the 10 poles he crafted for the 7 Cedars Casino on the tribal homeland. The art at the base of the pole depicts a whale hunter peering between tail flukes, reminding viewers of the S'Klailam's whale-hunting heritage.

Photographs: Dennis Collins Photography

Daie carved this chief's settee, measuring 34x22x72", out of clear, vertical-grain, old-growth western red cedar for a Native American businessman's home. The design tells of the Gonakadet, an undersea being who is a source of wealth and chiefly advantages.

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