How To Sharpen Multi Spur Bits

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To keep the rim of large Forstner-style bits from overheating, some manufacturers cut a series of "teeth" in the edge. This design helps die rim to cut faster and clear the waste easier. You'll find these saw teeth also add a couple of extra steps to the sharpening process.

cutting ups. The first step in the process is to file the cutting lips. This is done the same as the steps shown on the opposite page.

backs. To hone the teeth, you'll work in two steps. The first is to touch up the back edge. Here, I stroke the file toward the center and follow the existing angle (first photo at right).

face. The last step is to sharpen the face of each tooth. I use a triangular file to clean up the edge to match the factory grind (second photo).

After honing the lips, use a triangular file to sharpen the back edge of each tooth. This shapes the tooth and helps clear chips.

Next, sharpen the face of each tooth. Angle the file to match the factory grind. Then take even strokes for a smooth cut.

Step-By-Step; Making Inlays

The inlay kit consists of a brass bushing with locking ring, a removable sleeve, a centering post, and a down-cut spiral bit.

Rout the Shape. Begin by attaching the template to the piece with carpet tape. With the bushing installed on the router, and the bit set to a depth of rout the outline. Keep the bushing tight against the template as you change directions.

Clean out the Recess. Carefully move the router around the recess to remove all the wood and leave a flat bottom.

The inlay kit consists of a brass bushing with locking ring, a removable sleeve, a centering post, and a down-cut spiral bit.

The art of inlaying decorative wooden details into a piece of furniture has been a hallmark of fine craftsmanship for centuries. Traditionally, those inlays were painstakingly crafted to fit into hand-carved and chiseled recesses. But today, ali you need is a plunge router and a simple inlay kit.

the inlay kit. The secret to getting great results is in the design of the inlay kit, shown in the margin below. It's just a brass guide bushing that screws into the base of your router (like the ones you'd use with a dovetail jig) and a removable sleeve. The offset created by the sleeve matches the diameter of the spiral router bit. The removable sleeve allows you rout the inlay and the matching recess with only one template. This ensures a perfect-fitting inlay every time.

You can buy acrylic templates like the "bowtie" shown above (see page 49 for sources) or you can make your own from V MDF.

Step-By-Step; Making Inlays

Rout the Shape. Begin by attaching the template to the piece with carpet tape. With the bushing installed on the router, and the bit set to a depth of rout the outline. Keep the bushing tight against the template as you change directions.

Clean out the Recess. Carefully move the router around the recess to remove all the wood and leave a flat bottom.

>. With a shop-built template, you can create a larger pattern by using layout marks to maintain proper orientation of the design.

A First, lay out and rout the recesses that are square to the edges. Then, glue inlay pieces Into place and sand them flush.

J> Next, repeat the layout process with lines oriented 45° from the original marks. Finally, fit the Inlay pieces to complete the pattern.

getting started. As you can see in the box at the bottom of the page, the template and bushing kit make inlay work pretty straightforward. The downcut spiral bit leaves a smooth edge on both pieces.

But before you begin, you'll need to set up your router. You can use the centering post to install the bushing and secure it in the router base. This way, you'll be assured that the bit is centered in the bushing. If it isn't, you'll probably get some small deviations as you move the router around the inside of the template. Those deviations will show up as visible gaps in your finished inlay.

rout the recess. To keep the inlay oriented properly and in position on the workpiece, you'll need to use layout marks. I usually just mark center lines vertically and horizontally on the workpiece and on the template itself. You can see an example in the photos at right. Then it's just a matter of aligning the marks and attaching the template to the workpiece with some carpet tape. Finally, with the spiral bit installed and the sleeve on the bushing, rout out the recess.

cut out the inlay. To make a matching inlay piece, use the template as a "window" to find the right grain orientation. Then, using carpet tape, fasten the template securely to the inlay blank. To keep the template from moving and mining the inlay, make sure to use fresh tape for each piece you cut.

Now you can remove the sleeve from the bushing and carefully rout around the template to outline the inlay. The next step is to move to the band saw and cut the inlay free from the blank.

assembly. Since the router bit cuts the outside of the inlay and the inside of the recess, the inlay pieces have sharp corners and the corners of the recess are rounded. You can either lightly sand the inlay to round the corners or use a chisel to square the comers in the recess. Either way, be careful to remove only small amounts of wood to ensure a tight fit. Check your fit as you go.

When you have the fit you want, apply glue in the recess, especially around the sides, so it will seal tightly. Then cover the inlay with a waxed block of wood, tap the pieces in place, and clamp the assembly until the giue dries. You can finish the inlay by scraping or sanding the pieces flush.

With a little patience and this simple technique, you'll be surprised at how quickly you can add a creative detail to an otherwise ordinary woodworking project. CI

Make Your Own Template & Pattern

>. With a shop-built template, you can create a larger pattern by using layout marks to maintain proper orientation of the design.

A First, lay out and rout the recesses that are square to the edges. Then, glue inlay pieces Into place and sand them flush.

J> Next, repeat the layout process with lines oriented 45° from the original marks. Finally, fit the Inlay pieces to complete the pattern.

Workpiece

Free the Inlay Piece. At the band saw, resaw the stock to free the inlay. The piece should be a hair thicker than Vs".

Workpiece

Cut the Inlay. With the template attached to the inlay material, remove the sleeve and rout counterclockwise around the template. Make sure to keep the router flat, or it will gouge the inlay. Raise the bit before removing the router.

Free the Inlay Piece. At the band saw, resaw the stock to free the inlay. The piece should be a hair thicker than Vs".

Refine the Fit. For a perfect fit, either round the edges of the inlay, or square the comers of the recess with a chisel.

sieeve removed

An heirloom quilt is a work ofart and cherished can really brigJjteFriip a room. For this reason alone it sHEk^^.^ be oncjjspia'y for everyone to see. And the jack that diSplaysit AhSuId reflect a level of craftsmanship that measures up to .the" skill and time required to make the quilt.

The quilt rack you see above provides the solution Its* " Craftsman-style design complements the heirloom quality of the quilt, and it's sturdy enough to display a quiit of anvAi/e.

Mortise and tenon joinery provides strength and stability '

add an interesting look. Best of all, you'll be able to r:ut all mortises and tenons at your bible saw. '

Woodsmith f r

What Does Trim Head Screw Uses For

NOTE: Feet sides, stretchers, and top are made from -thick stock

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 32%"Wx 1lV2"D x 32%"H

Top mortises fit side piece tenon

Tenon is cut after side is glued up

Vi" chamfer softens tenon ends

- '/s'roundover on underside of top ensures a snag-free edge

Two-piece, edge-glued side assembly forms mortises for stretcher tenons

Keyed mortise and tepon joinery

Stretchers provide support and prevent racking-

Key fits square -opening in tenon

NOTE: Keys are Vi" thick

For more on how to cut keyed mortises on stretchers, see page 50 -

NOTE:

Mortises in top, sides, and feet are made by cutting dadoes in pieces before assembly

Chamfer softens ends

Wedged-shaped key

• Wedged key holds stretcher in position

Long and sturdy laminated feet give rack increased stability

Large lower tenon provides plenty of glue surface for strength

Materials & Cutting Diagram

Centered dadoes form mortise for lower side tenon when pieces are glued together build the

Sides & Feet

I began building the quilt rack by making the side assemblies. Each one consists of two parts — a side and a foot. Mortises for connecting the stretchers, top, and feet are made by cutting dadoes in the pieces before assembly.

FOOT. Each foot is made from two pieces of stock. A dado in each piece forms a mortise for the lower side piece tenon when they're glued together. Begin by setting your table saw dado blade to make a wide cut. Then center a dado through each piece, as shown in the box below.

After cutting the dadoes, 1 used a spacer block sized to fit the dado, like you see in the photo below, to help keep the parts in alignment during glueup and clamping.

Finally, a trip to the band saw is all it takes to cut the feet to final shape (detail 'c'). With both feet completed, you're now ready to move on to the sides.

BUILD THE SIDES. The sides of the quilt rack are made by simply gluing two long pieces of stock together. But before you glue them up, you'll need to cut a couple of mortises to hold the stretchers you'll build later.

You can make the mortises in the sides in the same way you cut r1

SIDE

NOTE: Mortises in feet and sides are cut on a tablesaw

16Vs

16Vs h SIDE

NOTE: Mortises in feet and sides are cut on a tablesaw

SIPE\ -VIEW

SIPE\ -VIEW

v - (£)foot
b. FRONT VIEW

Vs

Vi

7

/ \

V» i

Top tenon

T

the mortises for the feet. Simply turn the workpiece on edge and use your dado blade to cut notches on each of the side pieces.

END TENONS. After gluing the side pieces together, you'll need to cut a tenon at each end (detail 'a'

and 'b'). The box on the next page shows you how this is done.

Finally, cut the sides to rough shape. Then all that's left is to make a template and use a flush trim bit to trim each side to final size, as shown on the bottom of the next page.

How-To: Mortises on a Table Saw

How-To: Mortises on a Table Saw

A spacer block sized to fit each mortise helps maintain alignment of the mortises when the pieces are glued and clamped together.

Centered Mortise. Use a wide dado blade to cut the foot mortise. Just set the depth of the cut and position the rip fence to make the first pass. Then just flip the blank, make a second pass, and then remove the waste in between.

A spacer block sized to fit each mortise helps maintain alignment of the mortises when the pieces are glued and clamped together.

Centered Mortise. Use a wide dado blade to cut the foot mortise. Just set the depth of the cut and position the rip fence to make the first pass. Then just flip the blank, make a second pass, and then remove the waste in between.

NOTE:

Top is not glued in place

With the sides completed, you're now ready to build the stretchers. The stretchers are one of the most interesting parts of the quilt rack. A tenon on each end has a square opening to accept a hardwood key. The key locks the stretcher in the mortise to hold the rack together.

MAKE THE STRETCHERS. After cutting the stretchers to size, you'll need to cut tenons on each end (details 'a' and'd'). Again, I used a wide dado blade setup to cut the tenons on my table saw. Just set your blade to depth and cut the shoulders and cheeks of the tenon.

To soften the ends of the tenons, 1 chamfered the edges. You'll find some handy techniques for cutting these chamfers on page 20.

Next, square an opening in the tenon to accept a key (detail 'a'). You'll also need to make keys to wedge into the tenons {detail 'c'). It's a good idea to take a little time here to make sure the hole is tapered to match the key. You can learn more about making these tenons and the keys by turning to page 50.

THE TOP. The last tiling left to do is add a top to the rack. It has mortises similar to those on the sides to accept the upper side tenons.

STRETCHER

SIDE PROFILE TEMPLATE

STRETCHER

NOTE: For more on making keyed mortise and tenonj, refer to page SO

Waste

NOTE: To make keys, refer to page 51

1 «OF£: To make chamfers on tenons, refer to page 20

SIDE PROFILE TEMPLATE

You can make the top in much the same way you built the sides. You'll need to locate a notch in each top piece as shown in the drawing and detail 'b' above, I used the same technique for cutting these mortises that I used in making the side pieces.

After gluing the pieces together I routed an W roundover along the bottom edge for a snag-free edge.

After applying a finish you can assemble the rack. Begin with the feet and sides. Then insert the stretchers arid keys, add the top, and it's ready to display a quilt. KOI

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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    How to sharpen a multi bit?
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