Make it a Bunk

Tedswoodworking Plans

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The loft bed design can easily be converted to a bunk bed. The differences are pretty minor.

First, the lower notches in the legs are in a different location (detail above). Second, you'll need to build a frame with a mattress panel for the lower bunk identical to the upper frame.

You don't need side railings for the lower bunk, but I did include end railings, again identical to those above. And finally, when you build the ladder, you'll need a lower set of notches In the uprights and a narrower bottom step,

Cutting Diagram

V/2" X 7" - 84" Hard Maple (Two Boards 9 8.2 Bd. Ft.)

A

A

y///t

V/2" x 5" - 84" Hard Maple (Two Boards @ 5.8 Bd. Ft.)

V/2" x 5" - 84" Hard Maple (Two Boards @ 5.8 Bd. Ft.)

V/2" x 8Vi" - 96" Hard Maple (11.3 Bd. Ft.)

1V2" x 8V2" - 84" Hard Maple (9.9 Bd. Ft)

V/2" x 8V2" - 96" Hard Maple (11.3 Bd. Ft.)

ALSO NEEDED: Two 48" x 96" sheets W Birch plywood

1V2" x 8Vi" - 84" Hard Maple (Two Boards @ 9.9 Bd. Ft.)

V/2" x 8V2" - 96" Hard Maple (11.3 Bd. Ft.)

H—y

G

/////,

ALSO NEEDED: Two 48" x 96" sheets W Birch plywood

zzra

V/2' x 7' - 96" Hard Maple (9.3 Bd. Ft.)

T

T

T

T

T

T

vaa/aa ov/yy/.

T

T

T

T

T

V/2' x 7' - 96" Hard Maple (9.3 Bd. Ft)

U

V^.J

V WA

T TT"

V/2" x 7"

- 96" Hard Maple (9.3 Bd. Ft.)

X

M-i

X

I'//////////>

V/2- X8V2

m - 72" Hard Maple (8.5 Bd. Ft.)

Y

Y

w

Y

Y

w r?J//y/7rJy;/;/}///////<

NOTE: Parts O and R are planed to V2" thick

NOTE: All V/2"-thick parts are planed down from 1 -thick stock

Railing Bracket Jig

Making the railing brackets for the loft bed on page 22 isn't difficult. But because the bed requires fifteen of these brackets in all, the trick is to locate the holes accurately each time. And then, you need to cut each bracket to the same shape and size. To make these tasks easier, I built a special jig (photo at upper right).

If you take a look at the exploded view drawing below, you'll see that the jig is nothing more than a couple of pieces of hardwood sandwiched

CONSTRUCTION. To make the jig, start with the hardboard templates. You can lay out the profile on one of the template blanks (lower left drawing). Then carpet tape the blanks together before drilling the holes and cutting and sanding the profile smooth.

The spacers are just a couple pieces of -thick hardwood. You'll need to size the width of these pieces to match the thickness of the stock you're using for your railing brackets. (I made my spacers 1 V wide.) After carefully laying out and drilling the holes in each spacer, simply glue and screw the spacers in between the templates as shown.

using the jig. Tb use the jig, just slip a blank in between the templates of the jig and drill all the necessary holes, using the holes in the jig as a guide for your drill bit. Then after roughing out the bracket profile, you can use a flush trim bit with the jig to rout it smooth. Finally, remove the bracket and cut the notch on the table saw so it will fit over the frame assembly of the bed.

between a pair of hardboard templates, It does two things. First, the jig accurately positions the bracket to drill the holes for the aluminum tubing, the carriage bolts, and the wood do web that are used to attach the railing cap. And second, it allows you to rout the final profile of the railing bracket after roughing out the blank on the band saw.

spacer

NOTE:

Spacers are ty'-thick hardwood

NOTE:

Glue and screw templates to spacers end spacer

TEMPLATE

(V hardboard)

page 49 Attach templates to spacers with —■-#8x%"

Fh woodscrews railing bracket blank

TEMPLATE PATTERN

PA" hardboard)

TEMPLATE

CM" hardboard)

W radius

-Vi-radius

V-block is made from thick stock

Next, wipe down the tubing with acetone, taking care not to leave any fingerprints on the cleaned surface.

Using a synthetic abrasive pad, buff the tubing to remove any scuff marks and leave a satin finish.

Finally, apply a couple coats of spray lacquer to keep the tubing looking bright for years to come.

Template guides bit

Bit will LJ

drift in hole without

note:

Layout holes on template to match \holes on workpiece

\ TOP SECTION

VIEW

Polishing Aluminum Tul

The guard rails on the loft bed are made out of commonly available aluminum tubing. But to get the best-looking results, you'll need to do a little work on the tubing before installing it in the railing brackets. It's a simple, three-step process, as you can see in the photos below.

To start with, I removed any scuff marks and scratches by buffing the tubing with a synthetic abrasive pad. But 1 discovered something when doing this. If you wrap the pad around the tubing and twist it, you get a better-looking appearance than you would by simply rubbing the pad along the length of the tubing (far left photo below).

After buffing the tubing, the next step is to wipe off any grease or oil with a rag and a little acetone. Finally you can protect the tubing from future fingerprints by spraying on a couple coats of lacquer. B3

Next, wipe down the tubing with acetone, taking care not to leave any fingerprints on the cleaned surface.

Counterbore Drilling Template

The frame of the loft bed is attached to the legs with carriage bolts, nuts, and washers. To prevent the mattress from getting snagged on this hardware, T recessed the washer and nut into a counterbore drilled on die inside corner of the frame.

Ordinarily, I would drill a counterbore like this with a Forstner bit and then center the through hole for the bolt in the bottom of the counterbore. But I couldn't do that in the case of the bed. I had to drill the holes for the bolts first. And this didn't leave me with a spot to start the center-point of my Forstner bit to drill the counterbores. So 1 had to come up with another alternative to keep the Forstner bit from wandering.

The solution was to make a simple template to guide my Forstner bit. The template is nothing more than a piece of Vi" hardboard with a couple of holes drilled in it to match the diameter of the Forstner bit I was using (1"), as in detail 'a.'

To use the template, simply place it against the corner block of the frame so that the holes in the template are centered on the existing bolts holes. Then simply drill the counterbores.

The sides of the holes in the template guide tile Forstner bit as it enters the wood. And once it starts cutting, the rim of the bit takes over, guiding the bit the rest of the way.

Bit will LJ

drift in hole without

24" long) with a "V"-groave cut down the center. You can cut this groove on the table saw by simply tilting your saw blade 45°.

I used two blocks on my workbench while gluing the corner pieces into the legs. Then, I used a single block to support each leg while drilling the holes for the carriage bolts that attach the frames (see drawing).

Using a synthetic abrasive pad, buff the tubing to remove any scuff marks and leave a satin finish.

Finally, apply a couple coats of spray lacquer to keep the tubing looking bright for years to come.

\ TOP SECTION

VIEW

Template guides bit

V-block is made from thick stock

V-Blocks

One of the interesting features of the loft bed is the distinctive shape of the legs. But because the legs aren't square, I had to come up with a way of holding them securely while clamping and drilling. The answer was to make a couple of simple V-blocks (drawing at left).

Each block is nothing more than a piece of thick stock (approximately

7 Via. holes note:

Layout holes on template to match \holes on workpiece

Woodsmith

Heirloom Project full-length

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