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Tedswoodworking Plans

16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

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A couple of simple tasks are all that's left to complete the cart.

CASTERS. Part of the enjoyment in using this patio cart is its mobility. 1 chose large casters to make it easier to move over rough surfaces. And to keep the cart steady once I have it in place, the casters have brakes (see detail at right). I turned the cart upside down on a padded surface and used lag screws to fasten them.

DURABLE FINISH. To finish the cart, 1 used a spray gun to apply several coats of spar varnish thinned with paint thinner. I let each coat dry thoroughly, then lightly sanded between coats for a smooth, durable finish.

If you don't have a spray gun, you can use a brush-on or wipe-on oil finish that's made for outdoor use. See page 46 for some ideas.

To keep your patio cart looking new, it's best to wipe it down with a mild cleaning solution and a damp rag occasionally. And 1 try to wipe up any spills right away. After all, you'll be using it for food preparation and serving, so it's important to keep it clean.

With a little care, your patio cart will be around for a long time. CI

Materials List, Supplies, & Cutting Diagram

A Outer Leg Facings (8)

B Leg Spacers (4)

D Lower Stretchers (2)

E Upper Stretchers (2)

F Handle Raits (2)

H Groove Filler Strips (2)

M Bottom Shelf Rails (2)

N Middle Shelf Rails (2)

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• - Cut parts to rough length. Dimensions shown are final dimensions

• (4) Tabletop Fasteners & Screws . (20) #8 x 1W Rh Woodscrews

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44" x 5Vi" - 96" Red Oak (3.7 Bd. Ft.)

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Tenon Jig Plans
Wx V lag screw wtwasher

5" locking casters roll easily over rough surfaces and lock in

This serving tray and cutting board are easy to build and can be used alone or with the patio cart,

I enjoy cooking out, so anything that makes it easier is always welcome. And that's why I like this serving tray and cutting board. Besides being easy to build, they're designed to fit into the recessed storage area on the top of the patio cart as shown above.

The serving tray uses simple joinery. The bottom is made from 14"-thick slats with a tongue on each end. These slats fit into grooves cut into the sides of the tray. The end pieces form the tray handles and are fastened with the same knock-down connectors as the patio cart.

For the cutting board, I edge-glued some maple boards using waterproof glue. The juice groove in the top is easy to make using a core box bit and a template.

The handy thing about these projects is that they make the patio cart a complete grilling station (see page 20). But they also look and work great all by themselves.

radius f^T

HALF-SCALE PATTERN

diameter

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♦--2---

NOTE: Enlarge pattern 200%

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Serving fray

To make the tray, you'll start with the ends. The pattern at the bottom of the opposite page will help you lay out the shape.

After the end pieces are cut to shape, sand the edges smooth. I wanted to soften the look of the serving tray, so I created a bullnose on the top edge and on the ends. To do this, 1 used a -radius roundover bit on the router table (see detail 'a' at right). You can use the same setup to form a bullnose on the inside of the handles.

Now you can move on to the sides. First, an Vs" groove on the inside bottom edge houses the tongue on the ends of the slats (detail V). And, like the end pieces, I routed a bullnose on the top of the side rails.

Next, you can make the eight W-thick slats. They get a Vs'-thick tongue on each end, as shown in detail V at right. You're aiming for a snug fit in the grooves.

The assembly jig (page 30) comes in handy for aligning and spacing the slats. You need to trim the width of the two outside slats to fit the side rails. After you glue the slats in place, you can attach the ends with glue and connector bolts.

Cutting Board

The cutting board is made by edge-gluing stock to form a wide panel. You'll want to make the panel oversize and trim it later, I cut and arranged the boards for the best appearance and used waterproof glue for assembly.

After the glue is dry, you can trim the cutting board to size and sand both faces smooth.

To form the handles, first drill a l"-dia. hole at each end (detail 'a'). Then you can use your jig saw to cut out the waste between the holes.

Next, cut a V2" radius on the four corners. After sanding the edges smooth, I routed a bullnose profile on the edges and inside the handles (detail V at right).

The last thing to do is create the juice groove on top. Shop Notebook

W thick)

- Vi" spacing between slats

NOTE: End slats are narrower and should be cut to fit

W thick)

- Vi" spacing between slats

NOTE: End slats are narrower and should be cut to fit

Woodworking Jigs

FRONT SECTION VIEW

FRONT SECTION VIEW

SiI H

©Connector bolts connect tray ends to sides

SiI H

Cut to fit

Cut to fit

NOTE: All routing done after assembly

NOTE: All routing done after assembly

Routing Jig Groove Cutting Board Corners
NOTE: Cutting board glued up from individual strips

NOTE: For information on routing the juice groove, see page 30

NOTE: For information on routing the juice groove, see page 30

tips from our shop

'ith saw off, leave dado blade in base

SECOND: Use a slat and a 54" spacer to move fence to next position

blade

tips from our shop

Assembly Jig for Patio Cart

When I was assembling the top and shelves for the patio cart (page 20), it was tough to keep all the slats aligned and spaced just right. So I built this jig to help during the assembly and glue-up process (photo above). It separates the slats with hardwood spacers to keep a consistent gap between the siats.

I used a piece of 3A"-thick melamine about 2' wide and 4' long.

The melamine keeps the glue from sticking during glue-up.

You can use a 'A" dado blade to make the grooves for the spacers. To properly space the grooves, I used a Vi" spacer and a piece of stock the same width as the slats to adjust the location of my rip fence for each cut

(see Figure 2 below). The dado blade acts like an index key to locate the fence for the next cut. You'll need to make at least twelve grooves.

The spacers create a V4" gap between the slats during assembly. I planed them for a tight fit in the slots, so you don't need glue.

SECOND: Use a slat and a 54" spacer to move fence to next position

'ith saw off, leave dado blade in base

THIRD: Remove slat and spacer, make new cut Repeat the steps shown in figures 2 &3

FIRST: Make first slot at least 2V*" from end of jig blade

The dado bit has a top-mounted bearing like a pattern bit. But its short cutting length is designed for flattening the bottom of dadoes.

Dado Cleanout Bit

When you assemble the drawers for the apothecary cabinet on page 32, the drawer back covers the grooves in the sides (see drawing below). To open the groove, I used a dado cleanout bit (photo at left). Its short cutter length and guide bearing are ideal for this task.

To use the bit, you need an edge guide for the bearing to ride against. In this case, I needed two—one for each side of the dado. I used some scrap pieces with a nice, straight edge. And so they would extend past the back of the drawer, I made them longer than the drawer sides. This supports the router and provides a guide for the bearing during the cut. I temporarily fastened the guides in place using carpet tape, making sure the edges were flush with the edges of the dado. The drawing below shows the setup.

Now you can set the router on the edge guides and adjust the depth of the cut. You'll want to set it to the depth of the dado. Now, nibble away the waste piece from the drawer back at the end of the dado. Detail 'a' below shows how this works to create a smooth dado.

Routing A Juice Groove

Whether you use the cutting board (page 28) for cutting vegetables or meat, it's handy to have a "juice groove" to keep liquids from spilling off the edge (see photo at right).

The juice groove is easy to make with a Vz'-dia. core box bit in your router and a Vi"-thick template, as you can see in the drawing below. And to guide the router around the template, I used a bushing in my router's baseplate (see detail below).

MAKING THE TEMPLATE. The template is a rectangular piece of hardboard with a V2" radius on the comers. I mounted the template to the cutting board using carpet tape. You'll want to make sure the template is centered on the cutting board.

ROUTING THE GROOVE. To rout the groove, install the bushing and core box bit in your router. I set the depth of the bit to cut a groove that's 3/i6" deep. Then it's just a matter of routing in a counterclockwise direction around the template. If you're not using a plunge router, you'll need to tip the router to start the cut.

Woodworking Router JigsRouter Jigs For Woodwork

Router core box bit board

Mitered Spline Jig

The display shelves on page 16 are assembled using biscuits. But if you don't have a plate joiner, you can add splines to the miter joints for strength. You can make the grooves for the splines on your router table. Just use a slot-cutting bit and the jig shown below.

MAKING THE JIG. This jig is made from four pieces of plywood and a piece of hardwood for the cleat. The drawing at right gives you all the

a.

1 J

E

END VIEW

Template

Template

guide bushing

Fasten template to cutting board with -carpet tape

Center temp/ate on workpiece radius on all comers

NOTE: Rout in counterclockwise direction details you need to build it. A base and top piece are screwed to a couple of angle braces. The hardwood cleat is added to hold the work-piece square to the router fence and table. The jig holds the workpiece securely at a 45° angle for routing the slot in the face of the miter.

USING THE JIG. To use the jig, clamp your workpiece snug to the cleat so that the "point," or "toe," of the miter rests on your router table. Since you'll be making a stopped (hidden) groove, you need to know where to start and stop the cut. To help me out with this, 1 made two marks on my router table fence (see photo at left). Tine first mark, to the left of the bit, shows you where to start the plunge cut. The left edge of the workpiece should align with this mark when you start the cut by sliding the jig straight into the fence. Cut the slot by moving the jig from right to left. You'll stop cutting when the right edge of the work-piece reaches the mark to

Fence

END VIEW

Workpiece

SPLINE JIG

NOTE: Jig, top, base, ana brace made out of plywood

BRACE

Woodwork Jigs

Heirlo

This storage cabinet offers a stylish solu- dozen drawers can be a little overwhelm-

tion to an old problem. Where do we keep ing. Fortunately, they're built using a all the treasures — and the junk — that straightforward technique of locking rab-

never seem to find a home anywhere else bets. In fact, the whoie cabinet is a series in the house? Nothing beats a drawer. of rabbets and dadoes. Best of all, its slim

When it comes to making the cabinet, profile doesn't take up a lot of space, so though, the thought of having to build a you can put it anywhere.

WoodsnFiith

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 39% "W x 13"D x 43%"H

Hardwood top is fastened to case with screws -

Counterbored holes in case top allows top to expand and contract

Drawer fronts overlay face frame to provide a crisp clean look

See page 39 for a technique for cutting the locking rabbet joint

Twelve drawers in two different sizes offer ample storage

Half laps make building the face frame simple

Hardwood top is fastened to case with screws -

Counterbored holes in case top allows top to expand and contract

Drawer fronts overlay face frame to provide a crisp clean look

See page 39 for a technique for cutting the locking rabbet joint

Twelve drawers in two different sizes offer ample storage

Miter Spline Jig

Case Is constructed out of plywood

Base is fastened to case with screws, making the unit stable and sturdy

Base has a simple cut out profile

The hardwood base is rabbeted to hold the base panel

-Face frame is built with half-lap joinery, and is rabbeted to fit into the case

Half laps make building the face frame simple

Plywood Box For Tenoning Jig Storage

Case Is constructed out of plywood

Base is fastened to case with screws, making the unit stable and sturdy

Base has a simple cut out profile

The hardwood base is rabbeted to hold the base panel

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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Responses

  • thorsten
    How to cutting carpet by router?
    8 years ago
  • abdullah
    How to route a juice groove in a cutting bd?
    6 years ago

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