Locking Handle for Nesting Modules

Brass bar

Brass bar

18th Century Tool Chest

Not wanting to have to tote the entire stack of cabinets with him every time he worked away from the shop, Faeth carefully organized his tools on a module-to-module basis. One chest contains only sketching and drafting tools; another holds tools specific to cabinet installation. To provide a convenient way to carry the chests, Faeth created and installed brass handles. With the units stacked, the handles protrude through the floor of the overlying module, where a brass bar locks the units together (see the drawing above). With the doors locked, it's impossible to remove these keys and unstack the modules.

Harold Purcell, of Port Townsend, Washington, also drew upon some old European memories when he set out to design a tool chest for his growing collection of hand woodworking tools and accessories: the 18th-century campaign chest. These chests, originally designed to accompany British military officers on their pursuit of Napoleon, were sturdily built of hardwood and often reinforced with metal strapping. To make them easier to carry on the campaign, the chests were made to

Inspired by 18th-century campaign chests, furniture maker Harold Purcell designed a large, but portable, tool cabinet composed of three units on a removable support base. Each component weighs less than 30 lb. when unloaded. Photo by Vincent Laurence.

Craig Built Tool

A locking dovetail key links the bottom and middle units together. Photo by Craig Wester.

A shopmade brass cam locks the doors shut. Photo by Craig Wester.

A locking dovetail key links the bottom and middle units together. Photo by Craig Wester.

A shopmade brass cam locks the doors shut. Photo by Craig Wester.

separate from their base frames. Side handles provided lifting and tie-down points. Knowing how much a fully stocked tool cabinet might weigh and that a helping hand might not always be available when he needed to move his tools, Purcell was drawn to the idea of a campaign-style tool chest.

To ensure that he would be able to lift the chest by himself, Purcell broke it into three parts: a base featuring two deep drawers to contain power tools and accessories; a middle unit of 18 slide-out trays for small hand tools and miscellaneous items; and a lidded top bin to hold bulkier tools such as jointer planes and a 24-in. straightedge. Wanting to be sure that these components would form a rigid structure when assembled onto the support base, Purcell devised a locking dovetail key between the bottom and middle units (see the photo at top right). To lock the top unit in place, he designed the sides of the bin to lip over the underlying unit. A simple, shopmade brass cam (see the photo above right) acts as a lock to hold the doors shut.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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