Tabletop Fasteners

The shelf and top of the bookrack on page 20 are attached to the base with metal tabletop fasteners. The fasteners are nothing more than metal clips that fit into grooves (kerfs) on the inside of the rails. SHOP-MADE OPTION. These fasteners allow the workpiece to expand and contract with changes in humidity. But rather than buying tabletop fasteners, another option is to make your own out of wood. The shop-made fasteners are really nothing more than small blocks of wood that are rabbeted to...

Shop Tip Backrouting a Rabbet

Trestle Table Woodworking Plans

NOTE Hold workpiece firmly during backrouting pass A Skim Pass. To backrout a rabbet on the router table, set the bit to full height and adjust the fence for a very light cut. Holding the workpiece firmly, feed it from left to right. Right to Left. Once the top shoulder of the rabbet has been established, you can complete the rabbet with normal right-to-left passes. Tall Notch. Next, I raised the height of the blade and used a tall miter gauge fence to cut the notch at the back of the side. A...

Adding the

With the case assembled, the next step is to add the decorative details that give this clock its classic look. I chose a simple, shop-made trim for the base and a hardwood cap with a matching routed profile. To add depth to the clock face, I also installed a painted hardboard panel to surround the face and hands. BASE TRIM. Making the base trim is pretty straightforward. But before you begin, you'll need to attach a backer board to the front. This board frames the opening for the door and makes...

Another Option Urea Formaldehyde

After it's dried, it's easy to slice the bead off with a sharp chisel (main photo at left). I usually use latex gloves when working with polyurethane because it's messy and tougher to clean up than PVA. When you need a glue that provides an absolutely waterproof bond, the top choice is two-part epoxy. Epoxy is usually sold as paired individual components a resin and a hardener. One of the nice things about epoxy is that you can use different resins and hardeners to adjust the working...

Lazy Susan Router Trammel

Lazy Susan Woodworking Projects

Recently, I was building a cabinet with a lazy Susan and I needed to cut out a large, plywood circle for the turntable. While scratching my head trying to figure out how I was going to do this, it dawned on me that I could use the lazy Susan to make a trammel for my router. First, I mounted the router to an auxiliary base see drawing . I made the base the same thickness as the lazy Susan so that my router would sit level. Next, I cut a trammel arm out of plywood and attached it to the auxiliary...

How Toj Cut the Curved Stretchers

Trestle Table Edge Profiles

Lay out the curve by using a string and a thin strip of hardboard to form a bow. Then draw the gently curved line. Cut the Curve. At the band saw, cut the curve. Keep the blade slightly outside on the waste side of the layout line. Sand the Edge. Use a sanding drum on a drill press or a spindle sander to smooth the curved edge. NOTE See page 27 for a tip on making your own fasteners NOTE Pins cut - from VS'-dia. steel rod NOTE Bottom shelf is attached with screws and tabletop fasteners...

Cutting a Stopped

Trestle Table Plans With Breadboard Ends

A band saw is great for cutting curves or arcs. So naturally, this is the tool I turned to when it came time to cut the arc on the base of the mantel clock. But if you take a look at the photo at right, you'll notice that there is a shoulder at each end of the arc. This makes cutting the arc a little bit more challenging. To do this, I start by cutting the shoulders of the arc on the table saw. Raise the blade just high enough to establish the shoulder. You can use the fence as a stop, as shown...

HowTo Tenons Long Notch

Set the hp fence as a stop and remove the waste with multiple cuts. Flip the work-piece side-for-side to create matching tenons. Multiple Cuts. The quickest way to cut the long notch in the middle shelf is to make multiple passes over a wide dado blade. A Simple Chamfer. A small chamfer routed on the edges of the back boards disguises the splined joint. Spline Slots. To ensure that the spline slots in the back boards align, reference the inside face of each piece against the...

Trestle Table Rail Supports

To help strengthen the sliding extensions on the trestle table shown on page 28,1 added some rail supports. These are nothing more than short blocks of wood notched to fit around the rails. To avoid hitting the supports with your knees when sitting at the table, I softened the ends with a wide bevel, as you can see at left. I cut these bevels on the table saw by tilting the blade 10 . To help support the workpiece while making the cut, I built a simple saddle jig for my rip fence, like the one...

HowTo Make the Trim

Tall Table Saw Auxiliary Fence

A featherboard holds the workpiece flat against the router table for a smooth, consistent cut. Cutting Miters. Use an auxiliary fence on the miter gauge to back up the cut and prevent tearing out the ends. Clamp the workpiece to the drill press table and use a wing cutter to cut out the circle in the clock face trim board. CLOCK FACE TRIM. To create a frame around the clock face, I cut a hard-board panel to fit the case opening. Then I cut out a circle slightly smaller...

Saw Till

Trestle Table Edge Profiles

This wall-mounted case provides convenient storage for your handsaws and other treasured hand tools. A quality hand tool is a lifetime investment. As a matter of fact, many of the saws, planes and chisels that serve me well today started their careers in the possession of woodworkers several generations past. One of the keys to this longevity is proper care and storage. That's what this wall-mounted saw till is all about. The large, upper section provides a safe, convenient resting place for...

Shop Tip Small Pieces

Trestle Table With Pull Out Extension

A push block and an auxiliary fence and tabletop with openings cut to fit the router bit make routing the rail stops a little safer. A push block and an auxiliary fence and tabletop with openings cut to fit the router bit make routing the rail stops a little safer. used on the legs and stretcher. The box at the bottom of the opposite page shows how I did the job. It's a good idea to make enough edging for the top and the drop-in leaves. You'll want to leave some extra length on the edging and...

Making the

Making Breadboard Ends

Adding a pair of leaves to the trestle table gives you an extra 18 of length. They're simply made from the plywood pieces you laid aside when you cut the tabletop. And finally, adding some alignment hardware will complete the table. THE LEAVES. Making the leaves is pretty straightforward. With the two panels for the leaves cut to size, you start by adding the end and center supports that will form channels for the extension rails Then you can attach the end edging and then the bullnose edging,...

Finishing Jig for Table Legs

I find it easier to apply finish to table legs or spindles before assembling a project. But keeping the workpieces off the bench while they dry is a challenge. So I built a jig photo below that will hold legs or spindles of any length. It's just two, L-shaped brackets with evenly Drill VU'-dia. counterbore in center of Center platform applies pressure across surface

Glue

For your projects will help make sure they last a lifetime. When it's time to glue up a project, I usually reach for a bottle of yellow PVA polyvinyl acetate glue. And for most common woodworking tasks that's the right call. But if you've checked out the glue section at your local hardware store or home center lately then you'll know that there are a lot of other glues on the market. Some boast better holding power, others are designed for different applications. The choices can be...

Dovetail Layout

The drawings at right contrast the layout of drawer dovetails and case dovetails. The pins and tails of drawer dovetails are generally more uniform, as in Figure 1. Case dovetails can be made with proportionally wider tails 2l i to 3 times the width of the pins Figure 2 . Cutting fewer tails means less work without sacrificing any strength. And for more holding power, you can lay out the tails with a greater slope, up to 15 . Pins and tails are uniform in size and, spacing Pins and tails are...

Mitered Bridle Joint

Miter Tight Picture Frame Clamp

A table saw and a simple, shop-made jig are all you need to make strong, tight-fitting miter joints. The key to a strong mitered bridle joint is getting a snug fit on the mating parts. For this reason, I like to cut the slot first and then sneak up on the thickness of the tenon. To cut the slots, you'll need a way to support the workpiece on end. You can use either a shop-made or commercial tenoning jig on the table saw Figure 1 . I use a dado blade for A or larger slots. Slots for Vs-thick...

Bench grinder

Setup Platform Bench Grinder

Add some precision to your sharpening tasks by upgrading your tool rest. The Veritas Grinding Set makes grinding accurate bevels on chisels and plane irons a simple task. A bench grinder is an indispensable tool for maintaining an edge on chisels, turning tools, and plane irons. For many woodworkers, it's the first step in the tool sharpening process. But most bench grinders come with inadequate tool rests that make it difficult or impossible to get consistent results. Fortunately, there are a...

Hydraulic Gluing Press

I make a lot of segmented blanks are glued up and cut to and laminated bowls. I was using clamps to glue up the blanks, but I never seemed to be able to get good pressure at the center. So I came up with thegluing press you see in the photo above. The press is made up of three plywood tiers mounted on threaded rods. I used two layers of plywood in each tier to prevent them from flexing under pressure. A hydraulic bottle jack provides the clamping pressure. You can find bottle jacks at most home...