Cutting a Stopped

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16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

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A band saw is great for cutting curves or arcs. So naturally, this is the tool I turned to when it came time to cut the arc on the base of the mantel clock. But if you take a look at the photo at right, you'll notice that there is a shoulder at each end of the arc. This makes cutting the arc a little bit more challenging.

To do this, I start by cutting the shoulders of the arc on the table saw. Raise the blade just high enough to establish the shoulder. You can use the fence as a stop, as shown in Figure 1. Then just flip the workpiece around to cut the opposite shoulder.

The arc is cut in two separate passes. This allows you to cut cleanly into both corners of the shoulders. As you can see in Figure 2, the first pass removes most of the waste. Then come back and make a second cut in the opposite direction to remove the remaining waste (Figure 3). Finally, a little sanding will smooth out the edge of the arc profile. BS

Trestle Table Edge Profiles
The front base trim of the mantel clock features a stopped arc that terminates in a shoulder at each end.
Trestle Table Edge Profiles

Establish Shoulders. Using the rip fence as a stop, raise the blade just high enough to cut the shoulders at the ends of the arc.

Cut into Shoulder. To remove the bulk of the waste, start near one end of the arc and stop the cut at the corner of the shoulder.

Turn workpiece around and cut remaining waste

Turn workpiece around and cut remaining waste

Establish Shoulders. Using the rip fence as a stop, raise the blade just high enough to cut the shoulders at the ends of the arc.

Cut into Shoulder. To remove the bulk of the waste, start near one end of the arc and stop the cut at the corner of the shoulder.

Clean Up. To remove the remaining waste, turn the workpiece around so you're cutting into the opposite corner.

Trestle Table With Breadboard Ends

This twist on a traditional design makes room for extra seating. And with a few simple techniques, you'll have the table done quickly.

slide-out Trestle Table

The inspiration for this table comes from traditional trestle table design. It features a large, breadboard top on a sturdy base. But it has an interesting twist—each breadboard end slides out to accept a leaf.

It's not often you find a trestle table that expands. And if you do, the top splits in the middle for the drop-in leaves. But with the leaves on the ends, there's no need to build an elaborate expanding base. Just pull the ends out and add the leaves.

The table is built around a sturdy base that includes a stretcher to keep it stable. Simple, straightforward joinery keeps the stretcher in place. And a simple system of guides and rails underneath the top allow the ends to slide out smoothly and effortlessly. But the best part is, the top is made from plywood, so you don't have to fuss with a complicated glueup. The leaves are also cut from the same sheet of plywood, so matching them to the top is a piece of cake.

Breadboard Ends Plywood TableTrestle Table Base

NOTE: Base is made from poplar

NOTE:

Feet and arms are glued up from two layers

Extension rails are recessed into breadboard ends

Extension

Breadboard Ends Plywood Table

Through mortises are created by cutting dadoes in both halves of feet before glueup

Locks on table and leaves keep extended top in place

Cherry plywood top makes building a smooth table surface a snap

Patterns for cutting legs and arms are shown on page 31

Bullnose profile -softens edges of stretcher and legs

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 72 "L (90" Extended) x 36"Wx 30"H

Leaves at end of— table create room for extra seating

Frame keeps -top stable and creates track for extensions

Breadboard ends -pull out to accommodate leaves

NOTE: Table seats six or eight when fully extended

Bullnose edging hides-plywood edge

Breadboard ends are supported by extension rails

Brackets offer extra support to tracks

Ends of stretcher are notched to fit between legs

NOTE: Base is made from poplar

Bolts attach top to base

Two legs wrap around stretcher to create rocksolid base

NOTE:

Feet and arms are glued up from two layers

Breadboard ends on the table pull out to make room for drop-in leaves, creating extra seating space.

Extension rails are recessed into breadboard ends

Extension

Through mortises are created by cutting dadoes in both halves of feet before glueup

Locks on table and leaves keep extended top in place

Stepped dadoes create a pocket for

Cut dadoes on table saw before glueup

W-deep shoulders cut on table saw

Trestle Table Plans With Breadboard Ends

Shoulder and curves cut on band saw

NOTE: Blanks for arms and feet are glued up out of two layers of 1"-thick stock

TOP VIEW

Stepped dadoes create a pocket for

Cut dadoes on table saw before glueup making the

FEET & ARMS

W-deep shoulders cut on table saw

The base of the table has two identical trestle ends connected with a single stretcher. Each trestle end has a foot, two legs, and an arm, held together with mortise and tenon joinery. But rather than chopping out the mortises in the feet and arms, I used a simpler method on the table saw.

The blanks for the feet and arms are glued up from two layers of l"-thick stock. The trick is to cut matching dadoes in each half of the workpieces before they're glued up. Then when the two halves of the blank are glued together, the dadoes will form the mortises for the leg tenons.

MORTISES. You can cut the dadoes on the table saw using a dado blade. Just mark the location of each, as shown in detail 'a,' and nibble away the waste between the lines (How-To box below). Both the feet and the arms have the same size mortises, so you can cut the dadoes on all the pieces with the same table saw setup.

To keep the dadoes aligned during glueup, I used waxed keys.

You'll find more about this in the How-To box below. Once the glue is dry, you can start work on shaping the four separate workpieces.

TABLE SAW WORK. The first step in shaping the arms and feet is to spend some time at the table saw cutting the straight shoulder notches on these workpieces. You can start by transferring the patterns on the opposite page to the faces of the arms and feet. Then cut

Shoulder and curves cut on band saw

NOTE: Blanks for arms and feet are glued up out of two layers of 1"-thick stock

Cutting Tresdtle Table Legs

Cutting Dadoes. Alignment marks on the auxiliary fence and the workpiece allow you to cut the dadoes in the arms and legs accurately.

Glue Up. Waxed keys in the dadoes keep the two workpieces aligned during the glueup.

Shoulder Cut. Use a dado blade to cut a smooth shoulder in the bottom of the arms and in the feet.

Cutting Dadoes. Alignment marks on the auxiliary fence and the workpiece allow you to cut the dadoes in the arms and legs accurately.

Glue Up. Waxed keys in the dadoes keep the two workpieces aligned during the glueup.

Shoulder Cut. Use a dado blade to cut a smooth shoulder in the bottom of the arms and in the feet.

the shoulders at the top of the feet and the bottom of the arms (How-To box on opposite page).

ARM DETAILS. After these shoulders were cut, I turned my attention to shaping the details on the arms. The arms support the top, but they serve a second purpose, too. The sliding extension rails that you'll add later pass through notches in the arms. It's important to position these notches accurately so that the extension rails will slide freely through the notch.

To make sure these notches were cut correctly, I used a pair of stop blocks and a long auxiliary fence attached to the miter gauge. You'll find more information about cutting these notches in the box below.

SHAPING THE FEET & ARMS. Once the notches are cut, you can cut the remaining shoulders and profile on the four workpieces. Just cut to the waste side of the marked lines using a band saw. Then smooth the curves with a sanding drum on the drill press. Finally, you can clean up the shoulders on the four pieces with a chisel.

DRILL FOR ASSSEMBLY BOLTS. The final step for the arms is to locate and drill the counterbored holes for the mounting bolts (Figure 1). These holes are for the assembly bolts, which will be added later. They also act as guides in the next part of the assembly, so you'll want to take extra care to position them properly. I drilled these holes using the drill press.

foot pattern

Pattern Cutting Table

Drill '/¡"-deep hole with 1"-dia. Forstner bit

Scrollsaw Joint Jig

arm pattern

Scroll Saw Dragon Feet Furniture

Remove waste in several passes

Remove Waste. To complete the notch, lower the dado blade and nibble away the remaining waste.

end view

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  • ISOBEL
    How to make bread board ends on a trestle table 2" thick?
    10 months ago

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