By John Sainsbury

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Remove the tailstock and finish the stem with a freshly sharpened skew chisel. Wrap your index finger around the stem and pinch the skew against it lightfy.

Turn the stem diameter as thin as possible with the gouge.

Carefully cut away the remainder of the hollow and then cut the top off with the tip of the gouge.

by cutting with the side o! the gouge until the wood is thin enough for the top to break free. Then bring the tip of the gouge into the tiny bridge of wood remaining and the top will lean to one side and fall free into your hand.

Clean up the end of the cylinder with the skew, bring up the tailstock, and you're ready to shape the next top. A one-foot cylinder should make three or four tops. A

John Rocker

Peter Hutchinson is a semi-professional woodworker and woodturner living in Pennsylvania. He is the former editor and publisher of "American Woodturner." the journal of The American Association of Woodturners.

Making small wooden string ties is a lathe project where you can let your imagination run wild, the idea is simple. yet the variations can be endless. Just cut out small blanks of scrap wood, then inlay one or more circles of a contrasting wood into the scrap blanks in a random pattern. It's a good opportunity to use up odd bits of exotic wood that you might have on hand. I've used rosewood, sycamore, ebony, bog oak, and Mexican rosewood cut from scrap pieces rarely more than 7i in. thick.

I mount the scrap wood blank with its inlay on a small lathe faceplate and turn it to a smooth and attractive contour. The finished pieces could also be used as brooches, cufflinks, earrings or other costume jewelry.

To put an inlay in a scrap blank. I first make a hole in the blank with a forstner bit. Then I use a plug-cutter to cut a circular inlay piece the same size as the hole. I use a hard, quick setting glue like fast-curing epoxv to glue the circular inlay in the blank. Since

John Rocker

All you need are some wood scraps to make these unusual string ties. Both the wooden neck piece and the finiais on the ends of the string are easiy turned on the lathe.

FIG. 1: FASTENING STRING TO TIE

Epoxy clip on back of string tie.

Turn small wooden finíais to fK ends of string.

Bend small brass strip into two loops to form dip.

FIG. 1: FASTENING STRING TO TIE

Turn small wooden finíais to fK ends of string.

Epoxy clip on back of string tie.

Bend small brass strip into two loops to form dip.

Brass Inlays Woodworking

Drill holes in the scrap blanks with a forstner bit to accept the contrasting inlays. A small, hand-held wooden vise with wedges holds the blanks for drilling on the dril press.

You can place the contrasting inlay off the edge of the blank for a different effect This one's made of Mexican rosewood and sycamore.

After the little circular inlay is glued into the blank, mount it on a waste block with double-sided tape for shaping on the lathe. This piece is made from bog oak with a holy insert.

Smooth Cut Lathe Bit

Use a small fingernail gouge and keep the bevel rubbing to get as smooth a cut as possible right off the tool For a final polish, use fine steel wool.

forstner bils don't need a center spur to bore straight holes, you can make off-the-edge or overlapped holes in the blank to allow overlaping inlays. This really opens up a lot ot creative possibilities. Drilling small pieces can be tricky, so I made a small, hand-held wood vise that uses wooden wedges to hold the pieces on the drill press table (see photo).

After gluing up each piece, I flatten the back on a belt sander. Then I mount a flat waste block to the lathe faceplate and mount the piece on the waste block with double-sided tape or hot-melt glue. I found the little Klein Lathe to be just the right size for this job (Klein Design, Inc.. 6514 115th Place S.E.. Renton, WA 98056). I do the turning with tiny gouges—which must be very sharp —from the Sorby Micro set (available from Woodcraft Supplv, P.O. Box 1686. Parkers-burg. WV 26102, 800-225-1 ¡53). I try to gel as fine a cut as possible right off the tool by keeping the bevel rubbing as I cut. It's best to mimimize sanding because sanding dust from a darker wood can become embedded in the pores of lighter wood and spoil the color. I polish the piece with #0000 steel wool followed by a piece of burlap, then apply an oil finish.

I buy the thick string, called "bolo cord," at craft stores. I bend a small strip of brass to act as a to hold the string. This gels epoxicd to the back of the wooden tie (see Fig. 1). (Bolo cord and brass clip available from T.B. Hagstoz & Son. Inc., 709 Sansom St.. Philadelphia, PA 19106. 215-922-1627.) I also turn two little decorative finials from ebony to finish the ends of the string. That's all there is to it. See what designs your imagination can dream up. A

John Sains bury runs Creatiw Woodcraft studio in England, and acts as an educational technical advisor to Record Ridgway Tool Co. of Sheffield. He has written a nutnlyerof woodworking lxx)ks published in England and the U.S.

You can place the contrasting inlay off the edge of the blank for a different effect This one's made of Mexican rosewood and sycamore.

Drill holes in the scrap blanks with a forstner bit to accept the contrasting inlays. A small, hand-held wooden vise with wedges holds the blanks for drilling on the dril press.

After the little circular inlay is glued into the blank, mount it on a waste block with double-sided tape for shaping on the lathe. This piece is made from bog oak with a holy insert.

Use a small fingernail gouge and keep the bevel rubbing to get as smooth a cut as possible right off the tool For a final polish, use fine steel wool.

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Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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